Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)PPeripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)EnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MD;Barbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScN;Lisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPON;Darlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)7.0000000000000070.00000000000002344.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Children's veins may become damaged by frequent, painful needle insertions. A PICC may be the best way for some children to receive medicines and IV fluids or to have blood samples taken. Learn about this procedure and how to care for the PICC.</p><h2>What is a PICC?</h2><p>PICC is short for peripherally inserted central catheter. A PICC is a special intravenous (IV) line.</p><p>A PICC is a long, soft, thin, flexible tube that is inserted into a vein in the arm and ends in a large vein just above the heart. For babies, a PICC might be put into a vein in the leg instead.</p><p>A PICC is used in some children who need IV therapy for a long period of time. IV therapy means medicine that is put into the vein. Frequent needle insertions can be painful and can damage children's veins, so a PICC may be the best way for some children to receive medicines and IV fluids or to have blood samples taken.</p><p>An interventional radiologist or a nurse will insert your child's PICC in the Image Guided Therapy (IGT) department. An interventional radiologist is a doctor who use special viewing equipment such as X-rays, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scans to perform procedures that may have required traditional surgery in the past.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">PICC</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PICC_Line_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line) is used for patients who need long-term frequent IV therapy. It is inserted into a vein of the arm and ends in a large vein above the heart.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>PICC is short for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter. A PICC is a long, soft, thin, flexible tube that is inserted into a vein in the arm and ends in a large vein just above the heart. For babies, a PICC might be inserted into a vein in the leg. </li> <li>A PICC may be the best way for some children to receive medicines and IV fluids or to have blood samples taken </li> <li>Your child will be given pain medicine so she will not feel any pain during the procedure. </li> <li>A nurse will teach you how to take care of your child's PICC, including what to do if it breaks or the cap falls off. </li> </ul><h2>What to look out for after the PICC insertion</h2> <p>Contact your Community Care Nurse, the Vascular Access Service at the hospital, or your doctor or clinic nurse if you see any of the following: </p> <ul> <li>your child has fever or chills </li> <li>your child has bleeding, redness or swelling around the PICC </li> <li>your child has leaking or drainage at the PICC site </li> <li>your child's PICC is hard to flush or will not flush at all </li> <li>your child has pain when the PICC is being used </li> <li>your child's PICC is dislodged or comes out a little or all the way </li> </ul> <p>Each child's situation is different, so you should also ask your doctor if there are any specific instructions for your child. Write them here: </p> <p> </p><h2>How a PICC is inserted</h2> <p>During the procedure, the tip of the PICC will be positioned in a large vein just above the heart, where the blood flow is fast. This placement allows for better mixing of medicines and IV fluids. </p> <p>Equipment such as ultrasound and fluoroscopy (a special X-ray machine) may be used during the procedure. A chest X-ray may be taken after the procedure to make sure the PICC is in the right position. </p> <p>It will take about 30 to 60 minutes to insert a PICC. If it is hard to find a good vein, it may take longer.</p> <p>During the procedure, you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. When the procedure is over and your child starts to wake up, you may see your child. Once the PICC is inserted, the doctor or nurse will come out and talk with you about the procedure. </p> <h2>Pain relief during and after the procedure</h2> <p>For many children, the PICC will be inserted with only a local anaesthetic. Local anaesthetic is medicine to numb the area of the arm where the PICC will be inserted. This medicine is sometimes given by a needle into the skin, which may sting a little. Once the medicine has had time to work, your child should not feel any pain. </p> <p>Sometimes, children are given sedation or a general anaesthetic.</p> <ul> <li>A general anaesthetic means that your child will be asleep and will not have any pain during the procedure. </li> <li>If your child receives sedation, they may fall asleep or just be very sleepy during the procedure. Often, your child will not remember everything that happened during the procedure. Your child will be given a local anaesthetic as well.</li> </ul> <p>After the PICC is put in, children may feel pain in a small area on their arm. Usually this pain is mild and will go away within a few hours. If your child complains of a lot of pain, ask your nurse or doctor if they can have something to relieve the pain. </p> <p>Children often try to guard the arm that has the PICC. Encourage your child to use their arm normally. It is good and safe for your child to move the arm in all directions. </p><h2>When your child can go home</h2> <p>Some children can have a PICC placed and go home the same day. They may be ready to go home right away. Some children need to stay in the hospital for a few hours for observation (to be watched). This will depend on how much sedation was used. </p> <p>Children who are not discharged home will go back to their hospital room. The nurse can start using the PICC as soon as it is needed. </p><h2>Before the procedure</h2> <p>Before the procedure, the doctor or nurse inserting the PICC will meet with you to explain the procedure, answer your questions, and get your consent. </p> <p>If your child will be receiving a general anaesthetic (sleep medicine), you will also meet with the anaesthetist before the PICC insertion. This is the doctor who will give your child the sleep medicine. </p> <h3>Talk to your child about the procedure</h3> <p>Before any procedure, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen in a way that they will understand. Children feel less anxious when they know what to expect. It is important to be honest. If you are not sure how to answer your child's questions, ask the Child Life Specialist on your unit for help. </p> <h3>Blood tests</h3> <p>Your child may need blood tests before coming for the procedure. This is for your child's safety. Your child's doctor will arrange this. </p> <h3>Food and fluids before sedation or general anaesthetic</h3> <p>Depending on your child's age and medical condition, they may be awake during the procedure, slightly sedated (relaxed), or under a general anaesthetic, which will make them fall asleep. The doctor will know what type of anaesthetic is best for your child. </p> <p>Your child's stomach must be empty during and after the sedation or anaesthetic. This means your child is less likely to throw up or choke. </p> <h3>What your child can eat and drink before the sleep medicine (sedation or general anaesthetic)</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Time before procedure</th><th>What you need to know</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Midnight before the procedure</td> <td><p>No more solid food. This also means no gum or candy.</p> <p>Your child can still drink liquids such as milk, orange juice and clear liquids. Clear liquids are anything you can see through, such as apple juice, ginger ale or water. </p> <p>Your child can also eat Jell-O or popsicles.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>6 hours</td> <td>No more milk, formula or liquids you cannot see through, such as milk, orange juice and cola.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 hours</td> <td>Stop breastfeeding your baby.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 hours</td> <td>No more clear liquids. This means no more apple juice, water, ginger ale, Jell-O or popsicles.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><p>If you were given more instructions about eating and drinking, write them down here:</p> <p> </p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
மையத்துக்கப்பால் உட்செலுத்தப்பட்ட மைய வடிகுழாய்(PICC)மையத்துக்கப்பால் உட்செலுத்தப்பட்ட மைய வடிகுழாய்(PICC)Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)TamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ஒரு PICC செயல்முறையானது மருந்துகளை உட்செலுத்துவதற்கு அல்லது இரத்த மாதிரிகளை எடுப்பதற்கு பல பிள்ளைகளுக்கு சிறந்த வழியாக இருக்கலாம். </p>
القثطار المركزي المدخل محيطياًاالقثطار المركزي المدخل محيطياًPeripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)ArabicOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO, DCH, FRCSI, MCh, FFRRCSI, lmCC, FRCP(C), MD;Barbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScN;Lisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPON;Darlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)7.0000000000000070.00000000000002344.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>يستخدم القثطار المركزي المدخل محيطياً في بعض الاطفال الذين يحتاجون الى العلاج الوريدي لفترة طويلة من الزمن حين يكون الوصول الى الاوعية الدموية مهم. اقرأ المزيد هنا.</p>
外周中心静脉导管(PICC)外周中心静脉导管(PICC)Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)ChineseSimplifiedOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MDBarbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScNLisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPONDarlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)70.00000000000007.000000000000002344.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z儿童的静脉可能会因为频繁,痛苦的扎针而损坏。外周中心静脉导管对于一些儿童来说,可能是接受药物和静脉输液,以及采血样的最好的方式。了解此过程,以及如何护理外周中心静脉导管。<br>
外周靜脉置入中心靜脉導管(PICC)外周靜脉置入中心靜脉導管(PICC)Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)ChineseTraditionalOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MDBarbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScNLisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPONDarlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)70.00000000000007.000000000000002344.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z介紹外周靜脉置入中心靜脉導管過程,手術鉗準備事項,以及術後護理方法
Cathéter central inséré par voie périphérique (CCIP)CCathéter central inséré par voie périphérique (CCIP)Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)FrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MD;Barbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScN;Lisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPON;Darlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)7.0000000000000070.00000000000002344.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les veines des enfants peuvent être endommagées à la suite d’injections d’aiguilles fréquentes et douloureuses.</p><h2>Qu' est-ce qu' un CCIP?</h2> <p>Le CCIP est un acronyme pour cathéter central inséré par voie périphérique, un cathéter intraveineux (IV) spécial. </p> <p>Un CCIP est un tube long, mou, mince et souple inséré dans une veine du bras qui se termine dans une grosse veine au dessus du cœur. Pour les bébés, un CCIP peut être plutôt inséré dans la jambe. </p> <p>Un CCIP est utilisé chez certains enfants qui ont besoin d' une thérapie IV pendant une longue période. Une thérapie IV signifie l' administration d' un médicament dans une veine. L’insertion fréquente d’aiguilles peut être douloureuse et peut endommager les veines d’un enfant. C’est pourquoi le CCIP peut être le meilleur moyen pour certains enfants de recevoir des médicaments et des liquides par voie IV ou pour le prélèvement d’échantillons.</p> <p>Un radiologiste ou une infirmière insèrera le CCIP de votre enfant dans le département de thérapie guidée par l’image (TGI). Un radiologiste interventionnel est un médecin qui utilise un équipement de visualisation spécial comme une radiographie, une échographie ou la tomographie assistée par ordinateur (TAO) pour effectuer des interventions qui auparavant auraient dû nécessiter une opération normale. </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">CCIP</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PICC_Line_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Un cathéter central inséré par voie périphérique (CCIP) est utilisé pour les patients qui doivent suivre une thérapie de longue durée par intraveineuse. On insère le CCIP dans une veine du bras jusque dans une grosse veine au-dessus du cœur. </figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>L’acronyme CCIP signifie cathéter central inséré par voie périphérique. Un CCIP est un tube long, mou, mince et souple inséré dans une veine du bras qui se termine dans une grosse veine au dessus du cœur. Pour les bébés, un CCIP peut être plutôt inséré dans la jambe. </li> <li>Le CCIP pourrait être le meilleur moyen d’administrer des médicaments et des liquides IV à certains enfants ou de prélever du sang. </li> <li>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments contre la douleur pour qu’il n’ait pas mal pendant l’intervention. </li> <li>Une infirmière vous dira comment prendre soin du CCIP de votre enfant, y compris ce qu’il faut faire s’il se casse ou si le bouchon tombe. </li></ul><h2>Signes à observer après l’insertion du CCIP</h2> <p>Communiquez avec votre infirmière en soins communautaires, le service d’accès vasculaire de l’hôpital ou votre médecin ou infirmière si vous constatez l’une des choses suivantes : </p> <ul> <li>votre enfant a de la fièvre ou des frissons;</li> <li>la région autour du CCIP de votre enfant présente des saignements, une rougeur ou un gonflement; </li> <li>du liquide s’écoule du site du CCIP; </li> <li>le CCIP de votre enfant est difficile ou impossible à rincer; </li> <li>l’utilisation du CCIP est douloureuse; </li> <li>le CCIP s;est détaché, ou sort un peu ou complètement. </li></ul> <p>Chaque enfant est différent. Vous devriez donc demander à votre médecin s’il a des directives précises pour votre enfant. Écrivez-les ici : </p> <p> </p><h2>Comment on insère un CCIP</h2> <p>Pendant l’intervention, le bout d’un CCIP sera placé dans une grosse veine juste au-dessus du cœur, où le sang circule rapidement. Cette position permet un mélange optimal des médicaments et des liquides IV. </p> <p>Un l’équipement comme une échographie et la fluoroscopie (un appareil de radiographie spécial) peut être utilisé pendant l’intervention. Une radiographie du thorax peut être prise après l’intervention pour vérifier si le CCIP est bien placé. </p> <p>Il faudra environ 30 à 60 minutes pour insérer un CCIP. Si l’on a du mal à trouver une bonne veine, l’intervention pourrait être plus longue. </p> <p>Pendant l’intervention, on vous demandera d’attendre dans la salle d’attente. Quand l’intervention sera terminée et que votre enfant commencera à se réveiller, vous pourrez le voir. Une fois le CCIP installé, le médecin ou l’infirmière sortira pour vous parlera de l’intervention. </p> <h2>Soulagement de la douleur pendant et après l’intervention</h2> <p>Pour de nombreux enfants, le CCIP sera inséré seulement sous anesthésie locale. On utilise un médicament qui engourdit la région du bras où le CCIP est inséré. Ce médicament est parfois administré au moyen d’une aiguille dans la peau, ce qui peut pincer un peu. Une fois que le médicament aura eu le temps d’agir, votre enfant ne devrait plus ressentir de douleur. </p> <p>Parfois, on administre aux enfants un sédatif ou un anesthésique général.</p> <ul> <li>Un anesthésique général endormira votre enfant, qui ne ressentira aucune douleur pendant l’opération. </li> <li>Si votre enfant reçoit un sédatif, il pourrait s’endormir ou simplement être très somnolent pendant l’intervention. Souvent, votre enfant ne se souviendra pas de tout ce qui s’est passé pendant l’intervention. Il recevra également un anesthésique local. </li></ul> <p>Après l’installation du CCIP, certains enfants peuvent ressentir une douleur dans une petite région du bras. Habituellement, la douleur est légère et disparait au bout de quelques heures. Si votre enfant se plaint beaucoup de la douleur, demandez à l’infirmière ou au médecin si on peut lui donner quelquechose pour le soulager. </p> <p>Les enfants essaient souvent de protéger le bras qui porte le CCIP. Encouragez votre enfant à utiliser son bras normalement. Le fait de bouger son bras dans toutes les directions est non seulement sans danger, mais également bénéfique. </p><h2>Quand votre enfant peut retourner à la maison </h2> <p>Certains enfants peuvent retourner à la maison le même jour, et d’autres, immédiatement après. Certains enfants doivent par contre rester à l’hôpital quelques heures en observation (on les surveille). Cela dépend du type de sédatif utilisé. </p> <p>Les enfants qui ne sont pas autorisés à retourner à la maison retourneront à leur chambre d’hôpital. L’infirmière pourra commencer à utiliser le CCIP dès qu'elle en aura besoin. </p><h2>Avant l’intervention</h2> <p>Avant l’intervention, le médecin ou l’infirmière qui insère le CCIP vous rencontrera pour expliquer l’intervention, répondre à vos questions et obtenir votre consentement. </p> <p>Si votre enfant reçoit une anesthésie générale (médicament pour dormir), vous rencontrerez aussi l’anesthésiste avant l’insertion du CCIP. C’est le médecin qui administrera le médicament qui fera dormir votre enfant. </p> <h3>Parlez de l’intervention à votre enfant</h3> <p>Avant toute intervention, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui se passera en utilisant des mots qu’il pourra comprendre. Les enfants sont moins anxieux s’ils savent à quoi s’attendre. C’est important d’être honnête. Si vous hésitez quant à la réponse à une question, demandez à un éducateur en milieu pédiatrique de l’unité de vous aider à répondre. </p> <h3>Analyses sanguines</h3> <p>On pourrait devoir faire des analyses sanguines à votre enfant avant l’intervention, pour sa sécurité. C’est le médecin de votre enfant qui les demandera. </p> <h3>Aliments et liquides avant la sédation ou l’anesthésique général </h3> <p>Selon l’âge et l’état de santé de votre enfant, il pourrait demeurer éveillé pendant l’intervention, recevoir un sédatif léger (pour être détendu) ou un anesthésique général, qui l’endormira. Le médecin saura quel type d’anesthésique convient le mieux à votre enfant. </p> <p>L’estomac de votre enfant doit être vide pendant et après la sédation ou l’administration de l’anesthésique, car cela réduit le risque que votre enfant vomisse ou s’étouffe. </p> <table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h3>Ce que votre enfant peut manger et boire avant le sédatif (sédation ou anesthésique général)</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Nombre d’heures avant l’intervention</th><th>Ce que vous devez savoir</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Minuit avant l’intervention</td> <td><p>No more solid food. This also means no gum or candy.</p> <p>Aucun aliment solide, y compris de la gomme à mâcher ou des bonbons Votre enfant peut boire des liquides comme du lait, du jus d’orange et d’autres liquides clairs, c’est-à-dire des liquides transparents comme le jus de pomme, les boissons gazeuses au gingembre (comme du Canada Dry®) et l’eau.</p> <p>Votre enfant peut aussi manger du Jello ou des sucettes glacées (popsicles).</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>6 heures</td> <td>Plus de lait, de lait en poudre pour bébé, ou de liquides opaques, comme le lait, le jus d’orange et les boissons gazeuses.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 heures</td> <td>Cessez d’allaiter votre bébé.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 heures</td> <td>Plus de liquides clairs, c’est-à-dire de jus de pomme, d’eau, des boissons gazeuses au gingembre, de Jello et de sucettes glacées.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><p>Si vous avez reçu d’autres indications sur ce que votre enfant peut manger ou boire, écrivez-les ici :</p> <p> </p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
پیریفریلی انسرٹڈ سینٹرل کیتھیٹر (PICC)پپیریفریلی انسرٹڈ سینٹرل کیتھیٹر (PICC)Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)UrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MDBarbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScNLisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPONDarlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)70.00000000000007.000000000000002344.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Zبہت زیادہ سوئیاں داخل کرنے سے بچوں کی وریدوں کو نقصان پہنچ سکتا ہے۔ PICC کچھ بچوں کیلئے دوا دینے یا خون کا نمونہ لینے کا بہترین طریقہ ہوسکتا ہے۔
Catéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP)CCatéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP)Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)SpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MD Barbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScN Lisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPON Darlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>El CCIP (Catéter Central de Inserción Periférica) es para niños que necesitan una terapia intravenosa durante un tiempo. Infórmese sobre el cuidado del CCIP.</p>

 

 

Catéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP)1012.00000000000Catéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP)Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)CSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-17T05:00:00ZBairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, BAO; DCH; FRCSI, MCh; FFRRCSI; lmCC, FRCP(C), MD Barbara Bruinse, RN, BSc, BScN Lisa Honeyford, RN, MN, CPON Darlene Murray, BSN, MS(c)000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>El CCIP (Catéter Central de Inserción Periférica) es para niños que necesitan una terapia intravenosa durante un tiempo. Infórmese sobre el cuidado del CCIP.</p><h2>¿Qué es un CCIP?</h2> <p>CCIP es la sigla correspondiente a catéter central de inserción periférica. Un CCIP es una línea intravenosa (IV, por su sigla en inglés) especial.</p> <p>Un CCIP es un tubo largo, blando, delgado y flexible que se inserta en una vena del brazo y termina en una vena grande justo por encima del corazón. En el caso de los bebés, el CCIP se puede colocar en una vena de la pierna.</p> <figure> <p class="asset-image-title">CCIP</p> <img /> <figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">El catéter central de inserción periférica (línea CIP o CCIP) se utiliza en pacientes que necesitan una terapia intravenosa frecuente y a largo plazo. Se inserta en una vena del brazo y termina en una vena grande por encima del corazón.</figcaption> </figure> <p>El CCIP se usa en algunos niños que necesitan terapia intravenosa durante largos períodos de tiempo. Terapia intravenosa significa que se coloca un medicamento en el interior de la vena. Las inserciones frecuentes de agujas pueden ser dolorosas y dañar las venas de los niños. Por ello, el CCIP puede ser la mejor forma de que algunos niños reciban medicamentos y líquidos por vía intravenosa o se les saque sangre.</p> <p>Un radiólogo intervencionista o una enfermera colocarán el CCIP a su niño en la Unidad de Radioterapia Guiada por Imágenes (IGT, por su sigla en inglés). Un radiólogo intervencionista es un médico que utiliza un equipo de visualización especial, como una exploración por rayos X, ultrasonido o tomografía computarizada, para llevar a cabo procedimientos que posiblemente requerían cirugía tradicional en el pasado.</p> <h2>Antes del procedimiento</h2> <p>Antes del procedimiento, el médico o la enfermera que insertará el CCIP se reunirá con usted para explicarle el procedimiento, responder sus preguntas y obtener su consentimiento.</p> <p>Si su niño ha de recibir anestesia general (medicamento especial para dormir), usted verá también al anestesista antes de la inserción del CCIP. El anestesista es el médico que administrará a su niño el medicamento para dormir.</p> <h3>Hable con su niño acerca del procedimiento</h3> <p>Antes de cualquier procedimiento, es importante que hable con su niño acerca de lo que sucederá, de una manera que entienda. Los niños se sienten menos ansiosos cuando saben lo que va a pasar. Es importante ser honesto. Si usted no está seguro de cómo responder las preguntas de su niño, pida ayuda al Especialista en Terapia para Niños Hospitalizados de su unidad.</p> <h3>Análisis de sangre</h3> <p>Es posible que su niño deba hacerse algunos análisis de sangre antes del procedimiento. Esto se hace por la seguridad del niño. El pediatra lo determinará.</p> <h3>Alimentos y líquidos antes de la administración de sedantes o anestesia general</h3> <p>En función de la edad y el estado de salud, su niño podrá permanecer despierto durante el procedimiento, ligeramente sedado (relajado) o bajo anestesia general, que lo hará dormir por completo. El médico sabrá qué tipo de anestesia es mejor para su niño.</p> <p>Su niño debe tener el estómago vacío antes de y durante la administración de sedantes o anestesia general. De este modo, su niño tendrá menos posibilidades de vomitar o ahogarse.</p> <h3>Lo que su niño puede comer y beber antes de recibir el medicamento especial para dormir (sedantes o anestesia general)</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr> <th>Horas antes del procedimiento</th> <th>Lo que usted debe saber</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Medianoche antes del procedimiento</td> <td><p>No más alimentos sólidos. Esto también significa no más goma de mascar o caramelos.</p> <p>Su niño todavía puede beber líquidos tales como leche, jugo de naranja y líquidos claros. Líquidos claros son todos aquellos líquidos a través de los cuales se puede ver, como por ejemplo jugo de manzana, gaseosa de jengibre o agua. </p> <p>Su niño también puede comer gelatina o chupetines helados.</p></td></tr> <tr> <td>6 horas</td> <td><p>No más leche, preparado para lactantes o líquidos a través de los cuales no se puede ver, como leche, jugo de naranja o refrescos de cola.</p></td></tr><tr> <td>4 horas</td> <td> <p>Deje de amamantar a su bebé.</p></td></tr></tbody> <tbody> <tr> <td>2 horas</td> <td><p>No más líquidos claros. Esto significa no más jugo de manzana, agua, gaseosa de jengibre, gelatina o chupetines helados.</p></td></tr></tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>Si usted recibió otras instrucciones sobre lo que puede comer y beber su niño, escríbalas aquí:</p></td></tr> </tbody></table> <h2>Cómo se inserta un CCIP</h2> <p>Durante el procedimiento, el extremo del CCIP se desplazará hasta una vena grande justo por encima del corazón, donde el flujo sanguíneo es rápido. Esta ubicación permite un mejor mezclado de los medicamentos y los líquidos intravenosos.</p> <p>Es posible que se usen equipos como ultrasonido y fluoroscopio (una máquina especial de rayos X) durante el procedimiento. Se podrá tomar una radiografía de tórax después del procedimiento para asegurar que el CCIP ha llegado a la ubicación correcta.</p> <p>Insertar el CCIP tomará de 30 a 60 minutos. Si es difícil encontrar una buena vena, puede tomar más tiempo.</p> <p>Durante el procedimiento, se le pedirá que aguarde en la sala de espera. Cuando el procedimiento haya terminado y su niño empiece a despertarse, podrá verlo. Una vez insertado el CCIP, el médico o la enfermera saldrán a la sala y le hablarán del desarrollo del procedimiento.</p> <h2>Alivio del dolor durante y después del procedimiento</h2> <p>En muchos niños, el CCIP se insertará sólo con un anestésico local. Un anestésico local es un medicamento para adormecer el área del brazo donde se insertará el CCIP. Este medicamento se administra a veces introduciendo en la piel una aguja que puede pinchar un poquito. Una vez que el medicamento ha tenido tiempo de actuar, su niño no debería sentir dolor alguno.</p> <p>A veces a los niños se les administran sedantes o anestesia general.</p> <ul> <li>Anestesia general significa que su niño estará dormido y no sentirá dolor alguno durante el procedimiento</li> <li>Si su niño recibe sedantes, puede quedarse dormido o simplemente estar muy adormecido durante el procedimiento. Es muy común que el niño no recuerde lo que sucedió durante el procedimiento. También se le administrará a su niño una anestesia local</li></ul> <p>Una vez introducido el CCIP, el niño puede sentir dolor en una pequeña zona del brazo. Generalmente este dolor es leve y desaparece luego de unas pocas horas. Si su niño se queja de mucho dolor, consulte a su enfermera o médico si puede darle algo para aliviarlo.</p> <p>Los niños tienden a limitar el uso del brazo que tiene el CCIP. Aliente a su niño a usar su brazo normalmente. Es bueno y seguro para su niño mover el brazo en todas las direcciones.</p> <h2>Cuándo podrá volver a casa su niño</h2> <p>Algunos niños pueden irse a la casa el mismo día que le colocan el CCIP. En algunos casos, podrán partir de inmediato. Otros niños deberán permanecer en el hospital algunas horas para observación (para que los controlen). Esto dependerá de la cantidad de sedante que se haya usado.</p> <p>Los niños que no sean dados de alta de inmediato regresarán a su habitación en el hospital. La enfermera podrá comenzar a usar el CCIP tan pronto como sea necesario.</p> <h2>Riesgos de la inserción de un CCIP</h2> <p>Todo procedimiento médico conlleva cierto riesgo. Cada procedimiento se evalúa considerando el beneficio para el niño frente al riesgo que puede implicar. Los procedimientos se pueden considerar de bajo riesgo hasta alto riesgo, incluyendo la muerte.</p> <p>La inserción del CCIP generalmente se considera un procedimiento de bajo riesgo. El riesgo del procedimiento variará en función del estado de salud, la edad y el tamaño de su niño, así como de cualquier otro problema que pueda tener.</p> <p>Los riesgos que puede presentar la inserción de un catéter central, incluyendo un CCIP, pueden incluir:</p> <ul> <li>imposibilidad de encontrar una vena abierta que acepte el CCIP;</li> <li>sangrado o hematomas;</li> <li>infección;</li> <li>coagulación;</li> <li>aire en los pulmones o en las venas;</li> <li>ruptura de un vaso sanguíneo;</li> <li>ritmo cardíaco anormal;</li> <li>rotura del catéter;</li> <li>muerte (muy, muy poco frecuente)</li></ul> <h2>Cómo se debe cuidar el CCIP</h2> <p>El área donde el CCIP sale de la piel se cubrirá con un vendaje transparente. Este vendaje es estéril. Esto significa que se coloca de una manera especial que permita mantener el sitio tan libre de gérmenes como sea posible. El CCIP se puede usar de inmediato para administrar medicamentos o líquidos a su niño.</p> <p>Mientras esté en el hospital, las enfermeras vigilarán el CCIP de su niño. Para evitar que el CCIP se infecte, las enfermeras cambiarán los vendajes y los tapones en la medida de lo necesario, utilizando material estéril.</p> <p>Cuando su niño regrese a casa, una Enfermera Comunitaria controlará el CCIP. A medida que usted vaya ganando confianza para controlar el CCIP, la enfermera podrá enseñarle a asumir parte del cuidado.</p> <p>Para evitar que se obstruya, de manera que pueda funcionar correctamente cada vez que su niño necesite medicamentos o líquidos intravenosos, el CCIP siempre tendrá alguno de los siguientes elementos:</p> <ul> <li>Una infusión, donde los líquidos pasan a través de un tubo y una bomba</li> <li>Un Hep-Lock (catéter intravenoso heparinizado). La heparina es un medicamento que ayuda a evitar que se obstruya el CCIP. El CCIP se enjuagará con un nuevo volumen de heparina después de cada uso. Si el CCIP no se usa todos los días, el enjuague de heparina se hará cada 24 horas</li></ul> <p>Mantenga siempre el CCIP seco. Si el CCIP se moja, es más probable que se infecte. Su enfermera le enseñará cómo cubrir el CCIP para mantenerlo seco cuando su niño se bañe. Si el vendaje se moja, cámbielo inmediatamente.</p> <h2>Protección del CCIP</h2> <p>El CCIP no está fijo al interior del cuerpo de su niño. Por esta razón, si se jala de él, puede salirse. Es muy importante asegurarse de fijar siempre el CCIP en forma de bucle y cubrirlo con un vendaje. Asegúrese de que la gasa que envuelve el extremo del CCIP esté fijada con cinta adhesiva al brazo de su niño, o sobre el pecho si el niño es pequeño. Esto evitará que se salga accidentalmente.</p> <p>Mantener el CCIP bien sujeto al cuerpo de su niño evitará que se tuerza o se deforme. Esto es muy importante para evitar que se dañe o rompa.</p> <h3>Actividades</h3> <p>Luego de insertado el CCIP, su niño podrá retomar la mayoría de sus actividades habituales. Esto incluye ir a la guardería o a la escuela. Avise a los cuidadores o maestros del niño que tiene colocado el CCIP.</p> <p>Su niño también puede practicar algunos deportes y juegos, como andar en bicicleta. Es importante que retome sus actividades tan pronto como sea posible. Sin embargo, hay algunas cosas que no debería hacer:</p> <ul> <li>Su niño no debería hacer ningún tipo de deporte acuático ni nadar. Si el vendaje se moja, es más probable que se infecte. Si el vendaje se moja, cámbielo inmediatamente</li> <li>Su niño no debería practicar ningún deporte que pueda hacer que el CCIP se golpee o que se salga el catéter, como hockey, fútbol, gimnasia o baloncesto</li> <li>No utilice tijeras en las proximidades del CCIP. Nadie, incluyendo usted, su niño, una enfermera o un médico, debe usar tijeras en las proximidades del CCIP. Esto evitará que se corte</li> <li>No permita que otros niños toquen o jueguen con el CCIP</li></ul> <h2>Cuidados después de la inserción del CCIP</h2> <p>Contacte a su Enfermera Comunitaria, al Servicio de Acceso Vascular del hospital o a su médico o enfermera clínica si usted observa alguno de los siguientes signos:</p> <ul> <li>su niño tiene fiebre o escalofríos;</li> <li>la zona del CCIP está enrojecida, hinchada o sangra;</li> <li>hay goteo o drenaje en el sito del CCIP;</li> <li>le resulta difícil o imposible enjuagar el CCIP de su niño;</li> <li>su niño siente dolor cuando se usa el CCIP;</li> <li>el CCIP de su niño se ha desplazado o salido parcial o totalmente</li></ul> <p>Cada situación es diferente. Pregunte al médico si debe seguir instrucciones específicas en el caso de su niño. Anótelas aquí:</p> <h2>Qué debe hacer si se rompe el CCIP</h2> <p>Antes de dejar el hospital, recibirá un Botiquín de Emergencias para el CCIP. Este botiquín contiene los materiales que usted va a necesitar en el caso de que se rompa el CCIP de su niño. Una enfermera le dará el botiquín y lo revisará con usted antes de que usted se vaya. Usted debe asegurarse de que el botiquín esté siempre con su niño por si el CCIP alguna vez se rompe.</p> <p>Si el CCIP se rompe, haga lo siguiente:</p> <ol> <li>Mantenga la calma. Sujete el CCIP con una pinza entre el sitio de la rotura y donde ingresa a su niño</li> <li>Limpie el área rota con un hisopo embebido en clorhexidina</li> <li>Coloque una gasa limpia por debajo del área rota del CCIP y sujételo a la gasa con cinta adhesiva. Envuelva la gasa alrededor del catéter y luego fije con cinta esta envoltura de gasa al pecho de su niño</li> <li>Si el orificio es pequeño, usted debería tratar de heparinizar el CCIP (si se le ha enseñado cómo hacerlo) para evitar que se obstruya</li> <li>Llame al Servicio de Acceso Vascular ni bien haya hecho esto para obtener más instrucciones. Se le pedirá que traiga a su niño al hospital para examinarlo</li></ol> <p>Algunos CCIP se pueden reparar y no hace falta reemplazarlos. Algunos CCIP rotos se deberán extraer.</p> <h2>Qué debe hacer si se cae el tapón de inyección</h2> <p>Si se cae el tapón de inyección, busque los materiales del botiquín de emergencia para el CCIP y siga los pasos siguientes:</p> <ol> <li>Lávese las manos</li> <li>Limpie el extremo del CCIP con un hisopo embebido en clorhexidina</li> <li>Tome un nuevo tapón del botiquín y enrósquelo al extremo del CCIP. Coloque una gasa y sujétela con cinta alrededor del extremo del CCIP</li> <li>Sujete la gasa con cinta al brazo de su niño</li> <li>El tapón se debe cambiar tan pronto como sea posible, aplicando la técnica estéril. Usted puede hacerlo si se le ha enseñado cómo, o bien puede hacerlo la Enfermera Comunitaria</li></ol> <h2>¿Cuánto tiempo puede permanecer colocado el CCIP?</h2> <p>Un CCIP puede permanecer colocado semanas o meses.</p> <h3>Extracción del CCIP</h3> <p>Cuando el equipo médico considere que el CCIP ya no es necesario, tomará las medidas necesarias para que se lo extraiga. Este procedimiento es bastante simple y toma de 5 a 10 minutos. A veces se utiliza una crema para adormecer la piel alrededor del CCIP, o se inyecta un anestésico local en la piel antes de que el médico o la enfermera lo retiren. En ocasiones, dependiendo del tipo de CCIP que tenga su niño o de cuánto tiempo haya estado colocado, no habrá necesidad de usar un anestésico local. Su niño no va necesitar ningún tipo de sedante.</p> <h2>Detalles que usted debe conocer acerca del CCIP de su niño</h2> <p>Es importante que usted sepa algunas cosas acerca del CCIP de su niño. Si usted tiene algún problema y debe llamar a la Enfermera Comunitaria o al Servicio de Acceso Vascular, será útil que pueda suministrar la siguiente información acerca del CCIP de su niño, así como información sobre el problema. Complete la siguiente información:</p> <h3>Fecha de inserción:</h3> <h3>Tipo de catéter:</h3> <h3>Tamaño (marque con un círculo el que corresponde):</h3> <ul> <li>lumen individual</li> <li>doble lumen</li> <li>triple lumen</li> <li>con tapón</li> <li>sin tapón</li></ul> <h3>Catéter utilizado para (marque con un círculo todos los que corresponden):</h3> <ul> <li>antibióticos</li> <li>productos hemoderivados</li> <li>quimioterapia</li> <li>medicamentos</li> <li>toma de muestras de sangre</li> <li>NPT</li> <li>otro:</li></ul> <h3>Notas sobre el CCIP:</h3> <p> </p> <h2>Preguntas o inquietudes</h2> <p>Si tiene alguna pregunta o inquietud acerca del CCIP de su niño, puede llamar a alguna de las siguientes personas. Anote aquí todos los números telefónicos:</p> <p>Enfermera Comunitaria:</p> <p>Servicio de Acceso Vascular:</p> <p>El pediatra o la enfermera:</p> <p>Otros:</p> <h2>Puntos clave</h2> <ul> <li>CCIP es la sigla correspondiente a catéter central de inserción periférica. Un CCIP es un tubo largo, blando, delgado y flexible que se inserta en una vena del brazo y termina en una vena grande justo por encima del corazón. En el caso de los bebés, el CCIP se puede colocar en una vena de la pierna</li> <li>El CCIP puede ser la mejor forma de que algunos niños reciban medicamentos y líquidos por vía intravenosa o se les saque sangre</li> <li>Su niño recibirá anestésicos, por lo que no sentirá dolor alguno durante el procedimiento</li> <li>Una enfermera le enseñará cómo cuidar el CCIP de su niño, incluyendo qué hacer si se rompe o si se cae el tapón</li></ul>Catéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP)

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.