AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Choanal atresia: BilateralCChoanal atresia: BilateralChoanal atresia: BilateralEnglishOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>In bilateral choanal atresia both sides of the nasal passage are blocked by bone or soft tissue. Learn what happens during surgery and how to take care of your child at home.</p><h2>What is bilateral choanal atresia?</h2><p>Choanal atresia (say: co-ANN-ul ah-TREE-zee-ah) is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. The nasal passage is the route that brings air through the nose to the throat. Choanal atresia is present at birth. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side (unilateral) and some babies have both sides blocked (bilateral). </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Choanal </span><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">atresia</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="A normal nasal passage and a nasal passage with choanal atresia" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Choanal</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> atresia is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>In bilateral choanal atresia, the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue on both sides of the nose. Your baby will need an operation to help them breathe. </li> <li>During surgery, the nasal passage is opened, and small plastic tubes, called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </li> <li>A nurse will show you how to give your baby nose drops and suction the nasal passage. </li> <li>It is important for you and anyone who is spending time with your baby to know the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress, how to suction the nasal stents, and be trained in CPR. </li> </ul><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your baby's otolaryngology doctor, the otolaryngology clinic or your family doctor right away if your baby has any of the following signs after going home. </p> <ul> <li>yellowish or green nasal discharge </li> <li>bleeding from the nose or mouth </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>the stents fall out </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>swelling of the nose or face </li> <li>difficulty swallowing </li> <li>difficulty breathing </li> </ul> <p>If this is an emergency, do not wait. Take your baby to the closest emergency department.</p><h2>Your child will need surgery to open the nasal passage</h2> <p>Babies cannot breathe well through their mouths for the first three to six months of life, so a baby with bilateral choanal atresia will need surgery (an operation) as soon as possible. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. Your baby will be able to breathe through these tubes. The tubes also keep the nasal passages open while the area is healing. </p> <p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon (ear nose and throat doctor) will do the surgery.</p> <p>This page explains what to expect when your baby is having surgery for bilateral choanal atresia and how to take care of your baby after the operation. </p><h2>What happens during the operation</h2> <p>Before the operation starts, your baby will have a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This means your baby will sleep through the operation and will not feel any pain. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </p> <p>The operation usually takes from one to two hours.</p><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>You will be able to see your baby as soon as they are fully awake. A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your baby. </p> <h2>Your baby will probably be in the hospital for seven to 10 days</h2> <p>After the operation, your baby will spend up to four hours in the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit</a> (PACU). Your baby will then be transferred to a room on the Otolaryngology (ENT) inpatient unit. This room is called the constant observation room and has a nurse in it at all times. </p> <ul> <li>Your baby will be on a monitor that helps the nurse watch your baby's breathing. </li> <li>Your baby will have an IV tube in place until they are drinking and no longer needs IV medication. </li> <li>Your baby's nurse will tell you when your child can start drinking from the bottle or the breast. </li> <li>Your baby may sometimes have some pinkish-red mucus (sticky fluid) in their nasal stents or nostril. The nurses will suction this mucus with a narrow plastic tube. It will turn to a clear or white colour in a few days. </li> <li>You can sleep overnight in your baby's room. </li> <li>If your baby has pain after the operation, the doctor or nurse will give them pain medicine, either through the intravenous (IV) tube in the arm or as a liquid to swallow. </li> </ul> <p>If your baby has other medical conditions, your otolaryngology doctor will discuss this with you.</p><h2>Getting ready for the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your baby will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your baby must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Important information</h3> <p>Date and time of the operation:</p> <p>When you must stop feeding your baby:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <p>Your baby's otolaryngology (ENT) doctor:</p> <p>The doctor's phone number:</p> <p>The otolaryngology (ENT) clinic nurse's number:</p> <p>Your family doctor's number:</p>
Atrésie des choanes: bilatéraleAAtrésie des choanes: bilatéraleChoanal atresia: BilateralFrenchOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Vous apprendrez ce qui se passe pendant l'opération et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que l’atrésie des choanes bilatérale?</h2><p>L’atrésie choanale, ou atrésie des choanes, est une pathologie qui cause une obstruction du canal nasal par des os ou des tissus mous. Le canal nasal est le passage qui apporte l’air du nez vers la gorge. L’atrésie choanale est présente à la naissance. Certains bébés ont une obstruction du canal choanal d’un côté (unilatérale) et certains autres, des deux côtés (bilatérale). </p><p></p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Atrésie choanale</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_FR.png" alt="Un passage nasal normal et un passage nasal avec l’atrésie choanale" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> L'atrésie choanale est un trouble où l'arrière de la voie nasale est bloqué par des os ou du tissu mou. Certains bébés ont une voie nasale bloquée d'un côté.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Votre bébé aura besoin d’une opération pour pouvoir respirer. </li> <li>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal est ouvert, et de petits tubes de plastique, appelés endoprothèses nasales, sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal ouvert le temps qu'il guérisse.</li> <li>Une infirmière vous montrera comment donner des gouttes pour le nez à votre bébé et comment aspirer pour nettoyer le canal nasal.</li> <li>Il importe que vous et toute personne qui passe du temps avec votre bébé connaissiez les signes et symptômes de la détresse respiratoire, sachiez comment aspirer les endoprothèses et ayez reçu une formation en RCR. </li></ul><h2>Quand appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Veuillez appeler l’ORL, la clinique d’ORL ou votre médecin de famille immédiatement si votre bébé affiche les signes suivants une fois à la maison :</p> <ul> <li>écoulements nasaux jaunes ou verts;</li> <li>saignements du nez ou de la bouche; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus; </li> <li>l'endoprothèse tombe;</li> <li>douleur qui empire; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a> qui ne cessent pas;</li> <li>nez ou du visage enflés;</li> <li>difficulté à avaler;</li> <li>difficulté à respirer. </li></ul> <p>S’il s’agit d'une urgence, n'attendez pas et conduisez votre bébé au service d’urgence le plus près. </p><h2>Votre enfant devra se faire opérer pour que soit ouvert le canal nasal</h2> <p>Les bébés ont du mal à respirer par la bouche pendant les trois à six premiers mois de leur vie. Un bébé avec une atrésie choanale aura donc besoin d’une opération aussi tôt que possible. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le passage nasal est ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses (stent) nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse. Votre bébé sera en mesure de respirer par ces tubes. Les tubes gardent aussi les passages nasaux ouverts pendant que le site guérit. </p> <p>Un otorhinolaryingologiste/chirurgien de la tête et du cou (médecin spécialisé dans les oreilles, le nez et la gorge) fera l’opération. </p> <p>Cette page explique à quoi s’attendre quand votre bébé subit une opération pour l’atrésie choanale bilatérale et comment prendre soin de votre bébé après l’opération. </p><h2>Ce qui se passe pendant l’opération </h2> <p>Avant le début de l’opération, votre bébé aura besoin d’un « médicament pour dormir » spécial appelé <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésique général</a>. Cela signifie que votre bébé dormira tout au long de l’opération et ne sentira pas de douleur. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal sera ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le passage nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse.</p> <p>L’opération prend habituellement une à deux heures.</p><h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Vous pourrez voir votre bébé aussi tôt qu’il sera complètement réveillé. Un bénévole de la salle d’attente de la salle d’opération vous conduira auprès de votre bébé. </p> <h2>Votre enfant passera de 7 à 10 jours à l'hôpital</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre bébé passera jusqu’à quatre heures en salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’<a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=French">unité de soins postopératoires</a>. Votre bébé sera ensuite transféré dans une chambre de l’unité ORL. Cette salle est appelée chambre d’observation constante où une infirmière est présente en tout temps. </p> <ul> <li>Votre bébé sera branché à un moniteur qui aide l’infirmière à surveiller la respiration de votre bébé.</li> <li>Votre bébé aura un tube intraveineux (IV) jusqu’à ce qu’il boive et n’ait plus besoin des médicaments IV. </li> <li>L’infirmière de votre bébé vous dira quand votre enfant peut commencer à boire au biberon ou au sein.</li> <li>Votre bébé pourrait parfois avoir des écoulements rosâtres ou rouges (liquide collant) qui s’échappent des endoprothèses ou des narines. Les infirmières aspireront ce mucus au moyen d’un mince tube de plastique. Le mucus deviendra transparent ou blanc après quelques jours.</li> <li>Vous pouvez dormir dans la chambre de votre enfant.</li> <li>Si votre bébé ressent de la douleur après l’opération, le médecin ou l’infirmière lui donnera des médicaments, au moyen de l'IV dans son bras ou sous forme de liquide à avaler. </li></ul> <p>Si votre bébé a d'autres troubles médicaux, votre ORL en discutera avec vous. </p><h2>Se préparer pour l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre bébé devra cesser de manger et de boire. Le médecin ou l’infirmière vous dira quand votre bébé doit cesser de manger et de boire. </p> <h3>Renseignements importants</h3> <p>Date et heure de l’opération :</p> <p>Quand cesser de nourrir l’enfant :</p> <p>Autres choses à garder à l’esprit :</p> <p>Otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL) de votre enfant :</p> <p>Numéro de téléphone :</p> <p>Numéro de l’infirmière de la clinique ORL :</p> <p>Numéro de votre médecin de famille :</p>

 

 

Atrésie des choanes: bilatérale1030.00000000000Atrésie des choanes: bilatéraleChoanal atresia: BilateralAFrenchOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Vous apprendrez ce qui se passe pendant l'opération et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que l’atrésie des choanes bilatérale?</h2><p>L’atrésie choanale, ou atrésie des choanes, est une pathologie qui cause une obstruction du canal nasal par des os ou des tissus mous. Le canal nasal est le passage qui apporte l’air du nez vers la gorge. L’atrésie choanale est présente à la naissance. Certains bébés ont une obstruction du canal choanal d’un côté (unilatérale) et certains autres, des deux côtés (bilatérale). </p><p></p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Atrésie choanale</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_FR.png" alt="Un passage nasal normal et un passage nasal avec l’atrésie choanale" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> L'atrésie choanale est un trouble où l'arrière de la voie nasale est bloqué par des os ou du tissu mou. Certains bébés ont une voie nasale bloquée d'un côté.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Votre bébé aura besoin d’une opération pour pouvoir respirer. </li> <li>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal est ouvert, et de petits tubes de plastique, appelés endoprothèses nasales, sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal ouvert le temps qu'il guérisse.</li> <li>Une infirmière vous montrera comment donner des gouttes pour le nez à votre bébé et comment aspirer pour nettoyer le canal nasal.</li> <li>Il importe que vous et toute personne qui passe du temps avec votre bébé connaissiez les signes et symptômes de la détresse respiratoire, sachiez comment aspirer les endoprothèses et ayez reçu une formation en RCR. </li></ul><h2>Une infirmière vous enseignera comment prendre soin de votre bébé à la maison </h2> <p>Les infirmières de votre bébé, une coordonnatrice de transistion de soins ou un travailleur du Centre d’accès aux soins communautaires (CCAC) vous aideront à obtenir toutes les fournitures, tout l'équipement et toute l'aide dont vous aurez besoin à la maison. Les infirmières vous enseigneront comment prendre soin de votre bébé à la maison. </p> <ul> <li>Une infirmière vous enseignera, ainsi qu’à un autre soignant de la famille, comment évaluer si votre bébé respire bien par les endoprothèses et les signes et symptômes de détresse respiratoire. La détresse respiratoire signifie que votre bébé ne respire pas bien.</li> <li>On vous enseignera aussi comment nettoyer les endoprothèses par aspiration pour qu’elles ne s'obstruent pas. Avant que votre bébé ne retourne à la maison, des infirmières vous aideront à vous exercer jusqu'à ce que vous puissiez nettoyer les endoprothèses. </li> <li>Une infirmière vous montrera comment nettoyer le nez de votre bébé et comment lui donner des gouttes pour le nez.</li> <li>Vous et les autres membres de la famille devrez suivre un cours de <a href="/article?contentid=1044&language=French">réanimation cardiorespiratoire (RCR</a>). Un membre du personnel de l'hôpital prendra les mesures nécessaires </li></ul> <p>Quand vous pourrez <span>nettoyer les endoprothèses par aspiration avec confiance et quand l'ORL vous donnera son accord, vous pourrez retourner chez vous. Vous devrez apporter l'équipement d'aspiration avec vous. </span></p> <p>Avant que votre bébé ne soit autorisé à quiter l'hôpital, une « nuit de soins assurée les parents » sera organisée pour vous. Cela signifie que vous et l’autre soignant de la famille pourrez passer la nuit dans une chambre de l’unité, avec votre bébé. Ce sera vous qui prodiguerez les soins à votre bébé cette nuit-là. Vous pourrez consulter une infirmière comme personne-ressource. Cette mesure vise à améliorer votre confiance et votre indépendance par rapport aux soins de votre enfant. Elle vous aide aussi à prendre des décisions sur le fonctionnement des soins à la maison. </p> <h2>Soins à domicile</h2> <p>Suivez ces directives quand votre bébé retournera à la maison après l'intervention. </p> <h3>Gardez les voies nasales de votre bébé dégagées</h3> <p>Gardez les voies nasales de votre bébé dégagées comme les infirmières vous l'ont enseigné. </p> <h3>Donnez des gouttes nasales à votre bébé</h3> <p>L'infirmière vous donnera une prescription pour des gouttes nasales antibiotiques avant que vous ne quittiez l'hôpital. N’oubliez pas de mettre des gouttes dans le canal nasal, autour de l’endoprothèse. Ne mettez pas de gouttes dans l’endoprothèse. </p> <h3>Nourrir votre bébé</h3> <p>Votre bébé peut reprendre son alimentation normale. Rappellez vous de vous assurer que les voies nasales sont dégagées avant de commencer à nourrir l'enfant. </p> <h3>Vous pouvez donner des médicaments contre la douleur </h3> <p>Vous pourriez recevoir une prescription pour des médicaments contre la douleur avant que vous ne quittiez l'hôpital. Suivez les directives posologiques que votre pharmacien vous donnera. Si ces prescriptions peuvent être bénéfiques, elles sont aussi potentiellement très dangereuses si elles ne sont pas utilisées correctement. </p> <p>Quand vous utilisez ces médicaments, si vous remarquez des changements dans la respiration ou le niveau de conscience qui vous inquiètent, cessez de donner le médicament et consultez un médecin. Si votre enfant ne répond plus aux stimulations, appellez les secours (composez le 9-1-1) immédiatement. </p> <p>Ne donnez pas à votre enfant de médicaments en vente libre (qui peuvent avoir un effet de sédation) tout en lui donnant les médicaments prescrits. Les décongestionnants et les antihistaminiques sont des exemples. Parlez de ces médicaments à votre pharmacien. </p> <p>Vous pouvez donner de l’<a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=French">acétaminophène</a> (comme Tylenol ou Tempra) à votre enfant s’il a mal. Donnez la dose tel qu'indiqué sur la boîte, selon l'âge de votre enfant. Ne donnez pas d'<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a> (Motrin, Advil, ou Midol) ou d'<a href="/article?contentid=77&language=French">aspirine</a> pendant deux semaines après l’opération. Ces médicaments font augmenter le risque d’hémorragie après l’opération. Vérifiez auprès du médecin ou de l'infirmier avant de donner ces médicaments à votre enfant. </p> <h3>Comment aider votre bébé à mieux respirer</h3> <p>Vous pouvez utiliser un appareil appelé humidificateur pour aider votre bébé à mieux respirer. <span><span>Un humidificateur produit une brume fraîche qui humidifie l'air. Cela aide à évacuer le mucus qui se trouve dans les endoprothèses de votre bébé et l'empêche de coller et de les obstruer. Placez l'humidificateur près du lit de votre bébé. </span></span></p> <h3>Bains</h3> <p>Vous pouvez donner le bain à votre bébé. Assurez-vous que l’eau n’entre pas dans les endoprothèses.</p> <h3>Assurez-vous que toute personne qui prend soin de votre bébé sait comment faire </h3> <p>Ne laissez pas votre bébé avec quelqu’un qui ne sait pas assurer la sécurité de votre bébé, y compris : </p> <ul> <li>connaître les signes et symptômes de la détresse respiratoire; </li> <li>l’aspiration des endoprothèses;</li> <li>avoir une formation en RCR. </li></ul><h2>Quand appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Veuillez appeler l’ORL, la clinique d’ORL ou votre médecin de famille immédiatement si votre bébé affiche les signes suivants une fois à la maison :</p> <ul> <li>écoulements nasaux jaunes ou verts;</li> <li>saignements du nez ou de la bouche; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus; </li> <li>l'endoprothèse tombe;</li> <li>douleur qui empire; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a> qui ne cessent pas;</li> <li>nez ou du visage enflés;</li> <li>difficulté à avaler;</li> <li>difficulté à respirer. </li></ul> <p>S’il s’agit d'une urgence, n'attendez pas et conduisez votre bébé au service d’urgence le plus près. </p><h2>Votre bébé devra porter les endoprothèses pendant environ trois mois </h2> <p>Les endoprothèses demeurent habituellement en place pendant environ trois mois. Quand le temps sera venu, elles seront retirées à l’hôpital. Votre bébé aura besoin d'une anesthésie générale. </p> <p>L’ORL vous dira quand il devra voir votre bébé. L’unité d'ORL vous donnera la date de votre rendez-vous de suivi. </p> <h2>Assurez-vous que votre bébé est en sécurité</h2> <p>Ne laissez pas votre bébé avec quelqu’un qui ne sait pas assurer la sécurité de votre bébé, y compris : </p> <ul> <li>connaître les signes et symptômes de la détresse respiratoire;</li> <li>l’aspiration des endoprothèses;</li> <li>avoir une formation en RCR. </li></ul><h2>Votre enfant devra se faire opérer pour que soit ouvert le canal nasal</h2> <p>Les bébés ont du mal à respirer par la bouche pendant les trois à six premiers mois de leur vie. Un bébé avec une atrésie choanale aura donc besoin d’une opération aussi tôt que possible. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le passage nasal est ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses (stent) nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse. Votre bébé sera en mesure de respirer par ces tubes. Les tubes gardent aussi les passages nasaux ouverts pendant que le site guérit. </p> <p>Un otorhinolaryingologiste/chirurgien de la tête et du cou (médecin spécialisé dans les oreilles, le nez et la gorge) fera l’opération. </p> <p>Cette page explique à quoi s’attendre quand votre bébé subit une opération pour l’atrésie choanale bilatérale et comment prendre soin de votre bébé après l’opération. </p><h2>Ce qui se passe pendant l’opération </h2> <p>Avant le début de l’opération, votre bébé aura besoin d’un « médicament pour dormir » spécial appelé <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésique général</a>. Cela signifie que votre bébé dormira tout au long de l’opération et ne sentira pas de douleur. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal sera ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le passage nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse.</p> <p>L’opération prend habituellement une à deux heures.</p><h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Vous pourrez voir votre bébé aussi tôt qu’il sera complètement réveillé. Un bénévole de la salle d’attente de la salle d’opération vous conduira auprès de votre bébé. </p> <h2>Votre enfant passera de 7 à 10 jours à l'hôpital</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre bébé passera jusqu’à quatre heures en salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’<a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=French">unité de soins postopératoires</a>. Votre bébé sera ensuite transféré dans une chambre de l’unité ORL. Cette salle est appelée chambre d’observation constante où une infirmière est présente en tout temps. </p> <ul> <li>Votre bébé sera branché à un moniteur qui aide l’infirmière à surveiller la respiration de votre bébé.</li> <li>Votre bébé aura un tube intraveineux (IV) jusqu’à ce qu’il boive et n’ait plus besoin des médicaments IV. </li> <li>L’infirmière de votre bébé vous dira quand votre enfant peut commencer à boire au biberon ou au sein.</li> <li>Votre bébé pourrait parfois avoir des écoulements rosâtres ou rouges (liquide collant) qui s’échappent des endoprothèses ou des narines. Les infirmières aspireront ce mucus au moyen d’un mince tube de plastique. Le mucus deviendra transparent ou blanc après quelques jours.</li> <li>Vous pouvez dormir dans la chambre de votre enfant.</li> <li>Si votre bébé ressent de la douleur après l’opération, le médecin ou l’infirmière lui donnera des médicaments, au moyen de l'IV dans son bras ou sous forme de liquide à avaler. </li></ul> <p>Si votre bébé a d'autres troubles médicaux, votre ORL en discutera avec vous. </p><h2>Se préparer pour l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre bébé devra cesser de manger et de boire. Le médecin ou l’infirmière vous dira quand votre bébé doit cesser de manger et de boire. </p> <h3>Renseignements importants</h3> <p>Date et heure de l’opération :</p> <p>Quand cesser de nourrir l’enfant :</p> <p>Autres choses à garder à l’esprit :</p> <p>Otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL) de votre enfant :</p> <p>Numéro de téléphone :</p> <p>Numéro de l’infirmière de la clinique ORL :</p> <p>Numéro de votre médecin de famille :</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_EN.pngAtrésie des choanes: bilatéraleFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.