Slings: How to make a basic slingSSlings: How to make a basic slingSlings: How to make a basic slingEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)ArmBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-02-12T05:00:00ZElizabeth Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE​6.0000000000000079.0000000000000696.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to make simple but effective forearm and collarbone slings.</p><p>If your child injures their arm, they may need to wear a sling while it heals. A sling will keep the arm still to relieve any pain and prevent an injury from getting worse.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Before applying a sling, check for any serious cuts and make sure any bleeding is under control.</li> <li>For forearm slings, use padding for the injured arm and tie the sling around your child’s neck on the uninjured side.</li> <li>For shoulder or collarbone slings, drape the long side of the bandage down from the shoulder on the uninjured side, bring it over your child’s arm and tie it behind their back.</li> <li>Make sure the sling keeps your child’s arm in place but is not so tight that it limits blood flow.</li> <li>See a doctor if there is severe bleeding or if your child has dislocated a joint or broken a bone.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor for an arm injury</h2><p>See a doctor if you think your child has dislocated a joint or if they have a <a href="/Article?contentid=3032&language=English">broken bone</a> or severe bleeding.</p><h2>How to put on a sling</h2><p>There are two main types of sling: one for a forearm injury and one for a collarbone or shoulder injury.</p><h3>Forearm sling</h3><ol><li>Place the triangular bandage lengthwise against your child’s upper body. The long side of the bandage should extend down from their shoulder on the uninjured side. The shorter sides should point to the injured arm and meet near the elbow. Leave the top of the bandage over your child’s shoulder for now. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_01_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Gently place your child’s injured arm over the bandage and across their chest. Their wrist should be slightly higher than their elbow and at the middle of the cloth’s long edge.</li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_02_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <li>Support the injured arm with one hand. With your other hand, place a generous layer of padding, such as a rolled newspaper or folded towel, around the injured arm. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_03_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Bring the bottom of the bandage up over the injured arm and behind your child’s neck. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_04_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Tie the two ends of the bandage behind your child’s neck on the uninjured side. This will avoid placing any strain on their injury.</li><li>To stop your child’s arm from slipping out of the sling, use paper tape or safety pins to secure the point of the sling at your child’s elbow. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_05_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li></ol><h2>Check the fit of the sling</h2> <p>Once the sling is in place, occasionally check that there is enough blood flow in your child’s injured arm.</p> <p>You will need to loosen the sling if: </p> <ul> <li>your child’s skin appears pale or blue or feels cool</li> <li>your child’s arm becomes numb or starts to tingle</li> <li>there is a weak pulse.</li> </ul> <h2>How to keep your child’s arm completely still</h2> <p>Depending on your child’s injury, you might need to tie the sling to their chest to keep their arm completely still. To do this, wrap a second cloth around your child’s body and tie it on the uninjured side.</p><h2>What to use for a sling</h2> <p>A sling is a triangular bandage that you can find in most <a href="/Article?contentid=1038&language=English">first aid kits</a>. If you do not have a special first aid sling, you can make one from a piece of cloth. In emergencies, you can use a shirt or a sweater. Whatever material you use, make sure it does not stretch.</p> <h2>Checking your child for cuts and bleeding</h2> <p>Before you put a sling on your child, check their arm for any serious cuts that need to be treated. Make sure any <a href="/Article?contentid=1043&language=English">bleeding</a> is under control and clean the skin as well as possible before applying the sling.</p>

 

 

Slings: How to make a basic sling1036.00000000000Slings: How to make a basic slingSlings: How to make a basic slingSEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)ArmBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-02-12T05:00:00ZElizabeth Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE​6.0000000000000079.0000000000000696.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to make simple but effective forearm and collarbone slings.</p><p>If your child injures their arm, they may need to wear a sling while it heals. A sling will keep the arm still to relieve any pain and prevent an injury from getting worse.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Before applying a sling, check for any serious cuts and make sure any bleeding is under control.</li> <li>For forearm slings, use padding for the injured arm and tie the sling around your child’s neck on the uninjured side.</li> <li>For shoulder or collarbone slings, drape the long side of the bandage down from the shoulder on the uninjured side, bring it over your child’s arm and tie it behind their back.</li> <li>Make sure the sling keeps your child’s arm in place but is not so tight that it limits blood flow.</li> <li>See a doctor if there is severe bleeding or if your child has dislocated a joint or broken a bone.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor for an arm injury</h2><p>See a doctor if you think your child has dislocated a joint or if they have a <a href="/Article?contentid=3032&language=English">broken bone</a> or severe bleeding.</p><h2>How to put on a sling</h2><p>There are two main types of sling: one for a forearm injury and one for a collarbone or shoulder injury.</p><h3>Forearm sling</h3><ol><li>Place the triangular bandage lengthwise against your child’s upper body. The long side of the bandage should extend down from their shoulder on the uninjured side. The shorter sides should point to the injured arm and meet near the elbow. Leave the top of the bandage over your child’s shoulder for now. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_01_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Gently place your child’s injured arm over the bandage and across their chest. Their wrist should be slightly higher than their elbow and at the middle of the cloth’s long edge.</li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_02_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <li>Support the injured arm with one hand. With your other hand, place a generous layer of padding, such as a rolled newspaper or folded towel, around the injured arm. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_03_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Bring the bottom of the bandage up over the injured arm and behind your child’s neck. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_04_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Tie the two ends of the bandage behind your child’s neck on the uninjured side. This will avoid placing any strain on their injury.</li><li>To stop your child’s arm from slipping out of the sling, use paper tape or safety pins to secure the point of the sling at your child’s elbow. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_05_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li></ol><h3>Collarbone or shoulder sling</h3><ol><li>Gently place your child’s fingertips on their shoulder on the uninjured side. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_collarbone_01_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Take one end of the triangular bandage and hold it near your child’s fingertips. <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_collarbone_02.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Tuck the bandage under the elbow so it supports your child’s arm on the injured side.</li><li>Bring the other end of the bandage behind your child’s back and tie the two ends behind their neck. <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_collarbone_03.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li><li>Tuck any extra fabric behind the sling, near the elbow, or use paper tape or safety pins to keep it in place. <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_collarbone_04.jpg" alt="" /> </figure></li></ol><p>A first aid course can teach you more about applying different types of slings.</p><h2>Check the fit of the sling</h2> <p>Once the sling is in place, occasionally check that there is enough blood flow in your child’s injured arm.</p> <p>You will need to loosen the sling if: </p> <ul> <li>your child’s skin appears pale or blue or feels cool</li> <li>your child’s arm becomes numb or starts to tingle</li> <li>there is a weak pulse.</li> </ul> <h2>How to keep your child’s arm completely still</h2> <p>Depending on your child’s injury, you might need to tie the sling to their chest to keep their arm completely still. To do this, wrap a second cloth around your child’s body and tie it on the uninjured side.</p><h2>What to use for a sling</h2> <p>A sling is a triangular bandage that you can find in most <a href="/Article?contentid=1038&language=English">first aid kits</a>. If you do not have a special first aid sling, you can make one from a piece of cloth. In emergencies, you can use a shirt or a sweater. Whatever material you use, make sure it does not stretch.</p> <h2>Checking your child for cuts and bleeding</h2> <p>Before you put a sling on your child, check their arm for any serious cuts that need to be treated. Make sure any <a href="/Article?contentid=1043&language=English">bleeding</a> is under control and clean the skin as well as possible before applying the sling.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_slings_forearm_03_EN.jpgSlings: How to make a basic sling

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