Corticosteroids Given for a Long TimeCCorticosteroids Given for a Long TimeCorticosteroids Given for a Long TimeEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-21T04:00:00Z55.00000000000009.000000000000001777.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Corticosteroids are a group of medicines, which include dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone, prednisone, and prednisolone. This information sheet explains what corticosteroids do, how to give them and what side effects or problems your child</p><p>Corticosteroids (say: kor-ti-koe-STER-oids) are a group of medicines, which include:</p><ul><li>dexamethasone​ (say: deks-a-METH-a-sone)</li><li>hydrocortisone (say: hye-droe-KOR-ti-sone)</li><li>methylprednisolone (say: meth-il-pred-NIS-oh-lone)</li><li>prednisone (say: PRED-ni-sone)</li><li>prednisolone (say: pred-NIS-oh-lone)</li></ul> <p>This information sheet explains what corticosteroids do, how to give them, and what side effects or problems your child may have when he or she takes this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving corticosteroids to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to a steroid or any other medication.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has:<br></h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection (such as chickenpox) </li> <li>diabetes or problems with blood sugar </li> <li>stomach or intestine problems </li> <li>eye problems such as glaucoma<br></li> <li>any heart, kidney, or liver problems </li> <li>high blood pressure </li> <li>bone problems such as bone weakening or thinning </li> <li>behaviour problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child corticosteroids?</h2> <p>Your child may receive corticosteroids by a needle from a nurse or by liquid or tablets that they swallow. If your child is getting corticosteroids by mouth: </p> <ul><li>Give your child corticosteroids exactly as the doctor or pharmacist told you to do, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your doctor may want to gradually reduce the amount your child gets before completely stopping the medicine. </li> <li>Give your child corticosteroids at the same time each day. Give in the morning if your child is taking only one dose per day. </li> <li>Have your child take corticosteroids with food or milk to prevent them from getting an upset stomach. </li> <li>If your child is not able to swallow the tablets whole, speak to your pharmacist about other options. </li> <li>Shake the bottle well before you give your child the medicine. Measure the dose with the special spoon or oral syringe that the pharmacist gives you. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of corticosteroids?</h2> <p>If your child takes this medicine once a day:</p> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember if it is the same day as the missed dose. If you do not remember until the next day, skip the missed dose and return to the normal dose times. </li></ul> <p>If your child takes this medicine more than once a day:</p> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, it is fine to give two doses together unless your doctor has told you otherwise. </li> <li>Give the missed dose, then the regularly scheduled dose, and then go back to your usual schedule. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of corticosteroids?</h2> <p>The risk of side effects with corticosteroids depends on how long your child has treatment with corticosteroids, how often your child takes corticosteroids, and how big a dose your child needs to take. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>increased appetite </li> <li>weight gain </li> <li>indigestion (heartburn) </li> <li>trouble sleeping </li> <li>nervousness or changes in mood </li> <li>nausea (upset stomach) or vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>headache </li> <li>filling or rounding out of the face (called moon faces) </li> <li>acne </li> <li>increase in hair growth </li> <li>stretch marks on skin </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>changes in eyesight </li> <li>slowing of growth </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>signs of infection (e.g. fever, chills, sore throat, cough) </li> <li>frequent need to pass urine </li> <li>more thirsty than usual </li> <li>muscle weakness or pain </li> <li>pain in back, ribs, arms, legs, hip, or shoulder </li> <li>swelling of the feet or lower legs </li> <li>redness, pain, swelling, or sores on any area of the body </li> <li>stomach or throat pain or burning </li> <li>for girls, changes in menstrual periods </li> <li>for children with diabetes, uncontrolled blood sugars </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>pain or burning when urinating </li> <li>black, tarry stools, or blood in stools </li> <li>vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds </li></ul> <p>For injections:</p> <ul><li>burning, numbness, pain, or tingling at or near injection site </li> <li>hives (raised, red bumps on skin) </li> <li>shortness of breath, trouble breathing or wheezing </li> <li>swelling of face or eyes </li> <li>tightness in chest </li> <li>flushing of face or cheeks </li> <li>seizures </li></ul> <h3>If your child has been taking steroids for an extended period, the doctor may tell you to slowly reduce the amount of steroids over a period of time before stopping. This is called tapering. If you taper too fast, or stop altogether, your child may show some signs of withdrawal syndrome. Call your child's doctor if your child has any of these signs: </h3> <ul><li>frequent or unexplained headaches that do not go away </li> <li>low-grade fever </li> <li>muscle or joint pain </li> <li>nausea </li> <li>prolonged loss of appetite </li> <li>rapid weight loss </li> <li>reappearance of disease symptoms </li> <li>shortness of breath </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using corticosteroids?</h2> <p>Check with your doctor if your child's condition reappears or gets worse when the dose has been lowered or when treatment has stopped. </p> <p>Your doctor should check your child's progress at regular visits. Also, your child's progress may have to be checked after stopping corticosteroids since some of the effects may continue. </p> <p>Tell the doctor or dentist that your child is getting corticosteroids and after your child stops taking corticosteroids:</p> <ul><li>before having skin tests </li> <li>before having any kind of surgery (including dental surgery) or emergency treatment </li> <li>if your child gets sick or hurt </li></ul> <p>If your child will be using corticosteroids for a long time (more than three months):</p> <ul><li>Your doctor may suggest changing your child's diet. </li> <li>Your doctor may have your child take a medicine to help prevent bone problems while getting a corticosteroid. </li> <li>Your doctor may want your child to have their eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) before, and also sometime later during treatment. </li> <li>Your doctor may want your child to carry a medical identification card stating that your child is using this medicine. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated with steroids. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. </p> <p>While your child is getting this medicine and for some time after stopping treatment, your child may not be able to fight infection well. Corticosteroids may also mask or hide some of the usual symptoms of infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections:<br></p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the flu. </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse, or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You or child your child should not touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing you/your child's hands first. </li> <li>Your child's nurse will review with you what to do in case of fever. </li></ul> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with corticosteroids or in some cases the dose of corticosteroids or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter, or herbal) including: <a href="/Article?contentid=115&language=English">cyclosporine</a>, antifungals (including <a href="/Article?contentid=165&language=English">ketoconazole</a>), medicines used to control epilepsy, and some antibiotics. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about corticosteroids?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough corticosteroids to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep corticosteroid tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Check with your pharmacist how to store corticosteroid liquid. Storage will depend on the type of corticosteroid your child is taking. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>
Prise de corticostéroïdes pendant une longue périodePPrise de corticostéroïdes pendant une longue périodeCorticosteroids Given for a Long TimeFrenchPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-21T04:00:00ZLori Chen, BScPhm, RPh, ACPR55.00000000000009.000000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Les corticostéroïdes sont un groupe de médicaments qui comprend la dexaméthasone, l'hydrocortisone, la méthylprednisolone, la prednisone et la prednisolone.</p><p>Les corticostéroïdes sont un groupe de médicaments qui comprend les médicaments suivants :</p><ul><li>La dexaméthasone</li><li>L'hydrocortisone</li><li>La méthylprednisolone</li><li>La prednisone</li><li>La prednisolone</li></ul><p>La présente fiche de renseignements explique ce que font les corticostéroïdes, comment les administrer, et quels sont les effets secondaires ou les problèmes que votre enfant pourrait éprouver pendant qu'il prend ces médicaments.<br></p><h2>Avant de donner ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Avisez le médecin si votre enfant a déjà mal réagi à un stéroïde ou à tout autre médicament.</p> <h3>Avisez votre médecin ou votre pharmacien si votre enfant souffre de l'une des affections suivantes. Il pourrait s'avérer nécessaire de prendre des précautions avec ce médicament si tel est le cas. </h3> <ul><li>Infection ou exposition récente à une infection (comme la varicelle) </li> <li>Diabète ou problèmes de glycémie </li> <li>Problèmes gastriques ou intestinaux </li> <li>Problèmes oculaires comme le glaucome </li> <li>Tout problème lié au cœur, aux reins ou au foie </li> <li>Pression artérielle élevée </li> <li>Problèmes osseux comme un affaiblissement ou un amincissement des os </li> <li>Problèmes de comportement </li></ul><h2>Comment administrer ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Votre enfant pourrait recevoir des corticostéroïdes au moyen d'une injection effectuée par une infirmière ou en prenant des corticostéroïdes liquides ou en comprimés. Si votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes par voie orale : </p> <ul><li>Donnez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant exactement comme vous l'a indiqué le médecin ou le pharmacien, même si votre enfant semble se porter mieux. </li> <li>Parlez au médecin de votre enfant avant de cesser ce médicament pour quelque raison que ce soit. Votre médecin pourrait diminuer graduellement la dose de corticostéroïdes que prend votre enfant avant de cesser complètement les médicaments. </li> <li>Administrez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant à la même heure tous les jours. Donnez-les le matin si votre enfant ne prend qu'une dose par jour. </li> <li>Donnez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant avec de la nourriture ou du lait afin de prévenir les maux d'estomac. </li> <li>Si votre enfant ne peut avaler les comprimés entiers, demandez au pharmacien quelles sont les autres options. </li> <li>Agitez bien la bouteille avant de donner le médicament à votre enfant. Mesurez la dose à l'aide de la cuillère ou de la seringue que le pharmacien vous a donnée à cette fin. </li></ul><h2>Que faire si votre enfant manque une dose?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant prend ce médicament une fois par jour, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée dès que vous y pensez si vous y pensez la journée même. Si vous n'y pensez que la journée suivante, sautez la dose manquée et reprenez l'horaire régulier pour les doses. </li></ul> <p>Si votre enfant prend ce médicament plus d'une fois par jour, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée dès que vous y pensez. </li> <li>S'il est presque l'heure de la prochaine dose, vous pouvez donner les deux doses en même temps, à moins d'avis contraire du médecin. </li> <li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée, puis la dose requise selon l'horaire habituel. Ensuite, reprenez l'horaire habituel. </li></ul><h2>Quels sont les effets secondaires possibles de ce médicament?</h2> <p>Les chances que votre enfant éprouve des effets secondaires dépendent de la durée du traitement de votre enfant, de la fréquence à laquelle votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes et de la dose. </p> <p>Consultez le médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier affiche l'un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants et si ces effets ne se résorbent pas ou s'ils dérangent votre enfant : </p> <ul><li>Augmentation de l'appétit </li> <li>Prise de poids </li> <li>Indigestion (brûlures d'estomac) </li> <li>Difficulté à dormir </li> <li>Nervosité ou altération de l'humeur </li> <li>Nausée (mal de cœur) ou vomissements </li> <li>Maux de tête </li> <li>Visage qui devient plus rond (ce que l'on nomme un « faciès lunaire » ou un « faciès arrondi ») </li> <li>Acné </li> <li>Augmentation de la pilosité </li> <li>Vergetures sur la peau</li> <li>Fatigue ou faiblesse inhabituelle </li> <li>Modification de la vision </li> <li>Ralentissement de la croissance </li></ul> <p>Téléphonez au médecin de votre enfant pendant les heures de bureau si votre enfant affiche un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants :</p> <ul><li>Signes d'infection (p. ex. fièvre, frissons, mal de gorge, toux) </li> <li>Mictions (uriner) fréquentes </li> <li>Avoir soif plus souvent que d'habitude </li> <li>Faiblesse ou douleur musculaire </li> <li>Douleur dans le dos, les côtes, les bras, les jambes, les hanches ou les épaules </li> <li>Enflure des pieds ou du bas des jambes </li> <li>Rougeur, douleur, enflure ou plaies sur toute partie du corps </li> <li>Douleur ou brûlures d'estomac ou dans la gorge </li> <li>Chez les filles, modification du cycle menstruel </li> <li>Chez les enfants diabétiques, glycémie non contrôlée </li></ul> <h3>La plupart des effets secondaires suivants ne sont pas courants et pourraient laisser présager un problème grave. Téléphonez immédiatement au médecin de votre enfant ou rendez-vous à la salle d'urgence avec votre enfant si ce dernier affiche l'un des effets secondaires suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Douleur ou sensation de brûlure pendant les mictions (uriner) </li> <li>Selles noires, poisseuses ou qui contiennent du sang </li> <li>Vomir du sang ou une substance qui ressemble à des marcs de café</li></ul> <p>Chez les enfants qui reçoivent des injections :</p> <ul><li>Brûlure, engourdissement, douleur ou picotements à l'endroit où le liquide a été injecté ou près de cet endroit</li> <li>Urticaire (boutons rouges sur la peau) </li> <li>Souffle court, difficulté à respirer ou respiration sifflante </li> <li>Enflure du visage ou des yeux </li> <li>Oppression thoracique</li> <li>Visage ou joues rouges </li> <li>Crises </li></ul> <h3>Si votre enfant prend des stéroïdes depuis un certain temps, le médecin pourrait vous indiquer de réduire lentement la quantité de stéroïdes sur une certaine période avant d'arrêter complètement les médicaments. C'est ce que l'on nomme une diminution graduelle. Si vous diminuez le médicament trop rapidement, ou si vous l'arrêtez tout d'un coup, votre enfant pourrait afficher certains signes de sevrage. Téléphonez au médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier affiche un ou plusieurs des signes suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Maux de tête fréquents ou inexpliqués et qui ne se dissipent pas </li> <li>Faible fièvre </li> <li>Douleurs musculaires ou articulaires </li> <li>Nausée </li> <li>Perte d'appétit prolongée </li> <li>Perte de poids rapide </li> <li>Réapparition des symptômes de la maladie </li> <li>Souffle court </li> <li>Fatigue ou faiblesse inhabituelle </li></ul><h2>Mesures de sécurité à prendre lorsque votre enfant utilise ce médicament</h2> <p>Consultez votre médecin si l'état de votre enfant réapparaît où se détériore après avoir diminué la dose ou cessé le traitement. </p> <p>Votre médecin devrait évaluer les progrès de votre enfant dans le cadre de consultations régulières. On pourrait également vérifier l'état de votre enfant après l'arrêt des corticostéroïdes car certains effets secondaires pourraient continuer de se manifester. </p> <p>Avisez le médecin ou le dentiste que votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes, même après l'arrêt des corticostéroïdes, s'il :</p> <ul><li>doit subir des tests cutanés;</li> <li>doit subir une chirurgie (même des chirurgies dentaires) ou recevoir des soins d'urgence;</li> <li>tombe malade ou se blesse. </li></ul> <p>Si votre enfant doit prendre des corticostéroïdes pendant une longue période (plus de trois mois) : </p> <ul><li>Votre médecin pourrait suggérer de modifier la diète de votre enfant. </li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait prescrire des médicaments à votre enfant afin de prévenir l'apparition de problèmes osseux pendant qu'il prend des corticostéroïdes.</li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait demander qu'un ophtalmologue (médecin pour les yeux) vérifie les yeux de votre enfant, et ce, avant le début des corticostéroïdes et pendant le traitement.</li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait vous recommander que votre enfant ait avec lui une carte d'identification médicale indiquant qu'il prend des corticostéroïdes. </li></ul> <p>Votre enfant ne devrait pas recevoir des immunisations (vaccins) sans l'approbation préalable du médecin de votre enfant. Votre enfant et tous les membres de votre ménage devraient éviter de recevoir le vaccin oral contre la polio (vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral) pendant que votre enfant prend des stéroïdes. Avisez le médecin de votre enfant si l'un des membres de votre ménage a récemment reçu le vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral. Votre enfant devrait éviter d'entrer en contact avec toute personne qui a récemment reçu ce vaccin. </p> <p>Pendant que votre enfant prend ce médicament et pendant un certain temps après l'arrêt des médicaments, votre enfant pourrait avoir de la difficulté à combattre les infections. Les corticostéroïdes peuvent également masquer ou cacher certains des symptômes habituels d'une infection. Afin de prévenir les infections : </p> <ul><li>votre enfant devrait éviter de côtoyer des personnes qui ont contracté une infection, comme le rhume ou la grippe; </li> <li>votre enfant devrait éviter les endroits bondés; </li> <li>faites attention lorsque vous brossez les dents de votre enfant ou lorsque vous lui passez la soie dentaire. Le médecin, l'infirmière ou le dentiste pourrait vous suggérer diverses méthodes pour nettoyer la bouche et les dents de votre enfant; </li> <li>vous et votre enfant devriez laver vos mains avant de toucher ses yeux ou l'intérieur de son nez; </li> <li>l'infirmière de votre enfant vous indiquera quoi faire si votre enfant fait de la fièvre. </li></ul> <p>Certains médicaments ne devraient pas être pris en même temps que les corticostéroïdes ou, dans certains cas, il pourrait s'avérer nécessaire d'ajuster la dose de corticostéroïdes ou celle de l'autre médicament. Il est important d'informer votre médecin et votre pharmacien de tout autre médicament que prend votre enfant (médicaments sur ordonnance, médicaments sans ordonnance, produits à base d'herbes médicinales), y compris : la cyclosporine, les antifongiques (dont le kétoconazole), les médicaments utilisés pour contrôler l'épilepsie et certains antibiotiques. </p><h2>Autres renseignements importants au sujet de ce médicament</h2><ul><li>Dressez une liste de tous les médicaments que prend votre enfant et présentez-la au médecin ou au pharmacien.</li><li>Ne partagez pas les médicaments de votre enfant avec d'autres personnes et ne donnez jamais les médicaments d'une autre personne à votre enfant.</li><li>Assurez-vous de toujours avoir des réserves suffisantes de corticostéroïdes pour les fins de semaine, les congés et les vacances. Téléphonez à la pharmacie pour renouveler votre prescription au moins 2 jours avant d'avoir épuisé tous les médicaments. </li><li>Conservez les comprimés de corticostéroïdes à température ambiante dans un endroit frais, sec et à l'abri des rayons du soleil. NE les conservez PAS dans la salle de bain ou dans la cuisine.</li><li>Confirmez auprès de votre pharmacien quelle est la meilleure façon de conserver les corticostéroïdes liquides. La méthode de conservation dépendra du type de corticostéroïdes que prend votre enfant. </li><li>Ne conservez pas les médicaments périmés. Demandez à votre pharmacien quelle est la meilleure façon de disposer des médicaments périmés ou excédentaires.<br></li></ul>

 

 

Prise de corticostéroïdes pendant une longue période111.000000000000Prise de corticostéroïdes pendant une longue périodeCorticosteroids Given for a Long TimePFrenchPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-21T04:00:00ZLori Chen, BScPhm, RPh, ACPR55.00000000000009.000000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Les corticostéroïdes sont un groupe de médicaments qui comprend la dexaméthasone, l'hydrocortisone, la méthylprednisolone, la prednisone et la prednisolone.</p><p>Les corticostéroïdes sont un groupe de médicaments qui comprend les médicaments suivants :</p><ul><li>La dexaméthasone</li><li>L'hydrocortisone</li><li>La méthylprednisolone</li><li>La prednisone</li><li>La prednisolone</li></ul><p>La présente fiche de renseignements explique ce que font les corticostéroïdes, comment les administrer, et quels sont les effets secondaires ou les problèmes que votre enfant pourrait éprouver pendant qu'il prend ces médicaments.<br></p><h2>Que sont les corticostéroïdes?</h2> <p>Les corticostéroïdes sont des hormones stéroïdes que l'on utilise pour traiter de nombreux problèmes ou affections. Il ne s'agit pas du même type de stéroïdes que certains athlètes utilisent pour améliorer leurs performances sportives. Le corps de votre enfant produit naturellement des corticostéroïdes mais en moins grande quantité que celle administrée au moyen d'un médicament. </p> <p>On peut utiliser les corticostéroïdes pour traiter des problèmes dus à une inflammation (p. ex. la maladie de Crohn, l'asthme, les réactions allergiques) et pour diminuer la réaction immunitaire du corps (après une greffe d'organe ou de moelle osseuse). On utilise également les corticostéroïdes pour traiter certains cancers. Ces médicaments peuvent également aider à prévenir certains problèmes comme les réactions les allergiques ou les nausées que peuvent provoquer certains médicaments contre le cancer. </p> <p>Parfois, on utilise le vocable « stéroïdes » pour désigner les corticostéroïdes, ou on utilise leurs noms de marque, comme Solu-Cortef®, Solu-Medrol®, Depo-Medrol®, Pediapred®, ou Decadron®. Les corticostéroïdes sont disponibles sous forme de comprimés, d'injections et sous forme liquide. </p><h2>Avant de donner ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Avisez le médecin si votre enfant a déjà mal réagi à un stéroïde ou à tout autre médicament.</p> <h3>Avisez votre médecin ou votre pharmacien si votre enfant souffre de l'une des affections suivantes. Il pourrait s'avérer nécessaire de prendre des précautions avec ce médicament si tel est le cas. </h3> <ul><li>Infection ou exposition récente à une infection (comme la varicelle) </li> <li>Diabète ou problèmes de glycémie </li> <li>Problèmes gastriques ou intestinaux </li> <li>Problèmes oculaires comme le glaucome </li> <li>Tout problème lié au cœur, aux reins ou au foie </li> <li>Pression artérielle élevée </li> <li>Problèmes osseux comme un affaiblissement ou un amincissement des os </li> <li>Problèmes de comportement </li></ul><h2>Comment administrer ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Votre enfant pourrait recevoir des corticostéroïdes au moyen d'une injection effectuée par une infirmière ou en prenant des corticostéroïdes liquides ou en comprimés. Si votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes par voie orale : </p> <ul><li>Donnez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant exactement comme vous l'a indiqué le médecin ou le pharmacien, même si votre enfant semble se porter mieux. </li> <li>Parlez au médecin de votre enfant avant de cesser ce médicament pour quelque raison que ce soit. Votre médecin pourrait diminuer graduellement la dose de corticostéroïdes que prend votre enfant avant de cesser complètement les médicaments. </li> <li>Administrez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant à la même heure tous les jours. Donnez-les le matin si votre enfant ne prend qu'une dose par jour. </li> <li>Donnez les corticostéroïdes à votre enfant avec de la nourriture ou du lait afin de prévenir les maux d'estomac. </li> <li>Si votre enfant ne peut avaler les comprimés entiers, demandez au pharmacien quelles sont les autres options. </li> <li>Agitez bien la bouteille avant de donner le médicament à votre enfant. Mesurez la dose à l'aide de la cuillère ou de la seringue que le pharmacien vous a donnée à cette fin. </li></ul><h2>Que faire si votre enfant manque une dose?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant prend ce médicament une fois par jour, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée dès que vous y pensez si vous y pensez la journée même. Si vous n'y pensez que la journée suivante, sautez la dose manquée et reprenez l'horaire régulier pour les doses. </li></ul> <p>Si votre enfant prend ce médicament plus d'une fois par jour, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée dès que vous y pensez. </li> <li>S'il est presque l'heure de la prochaine dose, vous pouvez donner les deux doses en même temps, à moins d'avis contraire du médecin. </li> <li>Donnez-lui la dose manquée, puis la dose requise selon l'horaire habituel. Ensuite, reprenez l'horaire habituel. </li></ul><h2>Quels sont les effets secondaires possibles de ce médicament?</h2> <p>Les chances que votre enfant éprouve des effets secondaires dépendent de la durée du traitement de votre enfant, de la fréquence à laquelle votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes et de la dose. </p> <p>Consultez le médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier affiche l'un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants et si ces effets ne se résorbent pas ou s'ils dérangent votre enfant : </p> <ul><li>Augmentation de l'appétit </li> <li>Prise de poids </li> <li>Indigestion (brûlures d'estomac) </li> <li>Difficulté à dormir </li> <li>Nervosité ou altération de l'humeur </li> <li>Nausée (mal de cœur) ou vomissements </li> <li>Maux de tête </li> <li>Visage qui devient plus rond (ce que l'on nomme un « faciès lunaire » ou un « faciès arrondi ») </li> <li>Acné </li> <li>Augmentation de la pilosité </li> <li>Vergetures sur la peau</li> <li>Fatigue ou faiblesse inhabituelle </li> <li>Modification de la vision </li> <li>Ralentissement de la croissance </li></ul> <p>Téléphonez au médecin de votre enfant pendant les heures de bureau si votre enfant affiche un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants :</p> <ul><li>Signes d'infection (p. ex. fièvre, frissons, mal de gorge, toux) </li> <li>Mictions (uriner) fréquentes </li> <li>Avoir soif plus souvent que d'habitude </li> <li>Faiblesse ou douleur musculaire </li> <li>Douleur dans le dos, les côtes, les bras, les jambes, les hanches ou les épaules </li> <li>Enflure des pieds ou du bas des jambes </li> <li>Rougeur, douleur, enflure ou plaies sur toute partie du corps </li> <li>Douleur ou brûlures d'estomac ou dans la gorge </li> <li>Chez les filles, modification du cycle menstruel </li> <li>Chez les enfants diabétiques, glycémie non contrôlée </li></ul> <h3>La plupart des effets secondaires suivants ne sont pas courants et pourraient laisser présager un problème grave. Téléphonez immédiatement au médecin de votre enfant ou rendez-vous à la salle d'urgence avec votre enfant si ce dernier affiche l'un des effets secondaires suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Douleur ou sensation de brûlure pendant les mictions (uriner) </li> <li>Selles noires, poisseuses ou qui contiennent du sang </li> <li>Vomir du sang ou une substance qui ressemble à des marcs de café</li></ul> <p>Chez les enfants qui reçoivent des injections :</p> <ul><li>Brûlure, engourdissement, douleur ou picotements à l'endroit où le liquide a été injecté ou près de cet endroit</li> <li>Urticaire (boutons rouges sur la peau) </li> <li>Souffle court, difficulté à respirer ou respiration sifflante </li> <li>Enflure du visage ou des yeux </li> <li>Oppression thoracique</li> <li>Visage ou joues rouges </li> <li>Crises </li></ul> <h3>Si votre enfant prend des stéroïdes depuis un certain temps, le médecin pourrait vous indiquer de réduire lentement la quantité de stéroïdes sur une certaine période avant d'arrêter complètement les médicaments. C'est ce que l'on nomme une diminution graduelle. Si vous diminuez le médicament trop rapidement, ou si vous l'arrêtez tout d'un coup, votre enfant pourrait afficher certains signes de sevrage. Téléphonez au médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier affiche un ou plusieurs des signes suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Maux de tête fréquents ou inexpliqués et qui ne se dissipent pas </li> <li>Faible fièvre </li> <li>Douleurs musculaires ou articulaires </li> <li>Nausée </li> <li>Perte d'appétit prolongée </li> <li>Perte de poids rapide </li> <li>Réapparition des symptômes de la maladie </li> <li>Souffle court </li> <li>Fatigue ou faiblesse inhabituelle </li></ul><h2>Mesures de sécurité à prendre lorsque votre enfant utilise ce médicament</h2> <p>Consultez votre médecin si l'état de votre enfant réapparaît où se détériore après avoir diminué la dose ou cessé le traitement. </p> <p>Votre médecin devrait évaluer les progrès de votre enfant dans le cadre de consultations régulières. On pourrait également vérifier l'état de votre enfant après l'arrêt des corticostéroïdes car certains effets secondaires pourraient continuer de se manifester. </p> <p>Avisez le médecin ou le dentiste que votre enfant prend des corticostéroïdes, même après l'arrêt des corticostéroïdes, s'il :</p> <ul><li>doit subir des tests cutanés;</li> <li>doit subir une chirurgie (même des chirurgies dentaires) ou recevoir des soins d'urgence;</li> <li>tombe malade ou se blesse. </li></ul> <p>Si votre enfant doit prendre des corticostéroïdes pendant une longue période (plus de trois mois) : </p> <ul><li>Votre médecin pourrait suggérer de modifier la diète de votre enfant. </li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait prescrire des médicaments à votre enfant afin de prévenir l'apparition de problèmes osseux pendant qu'il prend des corticostéroïdes.</li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait demander qu'un ophtalmologue (médecin pour les yeux) vérifie les yeux de votre enfant, et ce, avant le début des corticostéroïdes et pendant le traitement.</li> <li>Votre médecin pourrait vous recommander que votre enfant ait avec lui une carte d'identification médicale indiquant qu'il prend des corticostéroïdes. </li></ul> <p>Votre enfant ne devrait pas recevoir des immunisations (vaccins) sans l'approbation préalable du médecin de votre enfant. Votre enfant et tous les membres de votre ménage devraient éviter de recevoir le vaccin oral contre la polio (vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral) pendant que votre enfant prend des stéroïdes. Avisez le médecin de votre enfant si l'un des membres de votre ménage a récemment reçu le vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral. Votre enfant devrait éviter d'entrer en contact avec toute personne qui a récemment reçu ce vaccin. </p> <p>Pendant que votre enfant prend ce médicament et pendant un certain temps après l'arrêt des médicaments, votre enfant pourrait avoir de la difficulté à combattre les infections. Les corticostéroïdes peuvent également masquer ou cacher certains des symptômes habituels d'une infection. Afin de prévenir les infections : </p> <ul><li>votre enfant devrait éviter de côtoyer des personnes qui ont contracté une infection, comme le rhume ou la grippe; </li> <li>votre enfant devrait éviter les endroits bondés; </li> <li>faites attention lorsque vous brossez les dents de votre enfant ou lorsque vous lui passez la soie dentaire. Le médecin, l'infirmière ou le dentiste pourrait vous suggérer diverses méthodes pour nettoyer la bouche et les dents de votre enfant; </li> <li>vous et votre enfant devriez laver vos mains avant de toucher ses yeux ou l'intérieur de son nez; </li> <li>l'infirmière de votre enfant vous indiquera quoi faire si votre enfant fait de la fièvre. </li></ul> <p>Certains médicaments ne devraient pas être pris en même temps que les corticostéroïdes ou, dans certains cas, il pourrait s'avérer nécessaire d'ajuster la dose de corticostéroïdes ou celle de l'autre médicament. Il est important d'informer votre médecin et votre pharmacien de tout autre médicament que prend votre enfant (médicaments sur ordonnance, médicaments sans ordonnance, produits à base d'herbes médicinales), y compris : la cyclosporine, les antifongiques (dont le kétoconazole), les médicaments utilisés pour contrôler l'épilepsie et certains antibiotiques. </p><h2>Autres renseignements importants au sujet de ce médicament</h2><ul><li>Dressez une liste de tous les médicaments que prend votre enfant et présentez-la au médecin ou au pharmacien.</li><li>Ne partagez pas les médicaments de votre enfant avec d'autres personnes et ne donnez jamais les médicaments d'une autre personne à votre enfant.</li><li>Assurez-vous de toujours avoir des réserves suffisantes de corticostéroïdes pour les fins de semaine, les congés et les vacances. Téléphonez à la pharmacie pour renouveler votre prescription au moins 2 jours avant d'avoir épuisé tous les médicaments. </li><li>Conservez les comprimés de corticostéroïdes à température ambiante dans un endroit frais, sec et à l'abri des rayons du soleil. NE les conservez PAS dans la salle de bain ou dans la cuisine.</li><li>Confirmez auprès de votre pharmacien quelle est la meilleure façon de conserver les corticostéroïdes liquides. La méthode de conservation dépendra du type de corticostéroïdes que prend votre enfant. </li><li>Ne conservez pas les médicaments périmés. Demandez à votre pharmacien quelle est la meilleure façon de disposer des médicaments périmés ou excédentaires.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.pngPrise de corticostéroïdes pendant une longue périodeCorticostéroïdes

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.