Behaviour changes and brain tumoursBBehaviour changes and brain tumoursBehaviour changes and brain tumoursEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.0000000000000379.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning behavior changes you might see in your child during brain tumour treatment.</p><br><p>Many children who have a serious illness such as a brain tumour learn to adjust to their situation over time, with the right support. But like adults, children have good days and bad days. If your child is having a bad day, it may be hard to tell whether the cause is the tumour, the treatment or your child just being a child. Crying, anger, fussiness, acting out, tantrums or withdrawing can all be normal behaviours for children at certain times. Some children may show more serious behaviours, such as becoming depressed, anxious, not sleeping well, having problems with relationships or in school or refusing to have treatments. More serious behaviour changes need to be attended to quickly. Talk to your treatment team if you are concerned. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>It can be difficult to tell if your child's behaviour is due to the tumour, the treatment, or your child just being a child.</li> <li>More serious behaviour changes need to be attended to quickly and should be discussed with the treatment team.</li> <li>There are several approaches you can take at home to reduce problem behaviours.</li></ul>
Changements de comportement et les tumeurs cérébralesCChangements de comportement et les tumeurs cérébralesBehaviour changes and brain tumoursFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.0000000000000379.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Information détaillée au sujet des changements de comportement que vous pourriez constater chez votre enfant pendant le traitement contre la tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>Bon nombre d'enfants atteints d'une maladie grave comme une tumeur cérébrale apprennent à s'ajuster à leur situation au fil du temps, avec un bon soutien. Cependant, tout comme les adultes, les enfants connaissent de bonnes et de mauvaises journées. Si votre enfant connaît une mauvaise journée, il pourrait être difficile de déterminer si la cause en est la tumeur, le traitement ou le fait que votre enfant agit comme un enfant. Les pleurs, la colère, l’irritabilité, le mauvais comportement, les crises et le retrait peuvent être des comportements normaux chez les enfants à certains moments.</p> <p>Certains enfants pourraient afficher des comportements problématiques, comme la déprime, l'anxiété, les troubles du sommeil, les problèmes relationnels ou scolaires ou le refus de subir des traitements. Les graves changements de comportement doivent être pris en charge rapidement. Parlez à votre équipe de traitement si vous avez des préoccupations.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il peut être difficile d’évaluer si le comportement de votre enfant est dû à sa tumeur ou au traitement, ou si votre enfant agit tout simplement comme un enfant.</li> <li>Vous devez rapidement porter attention à des changements de comportement et vous devriez en discuter avec l’équipe de traitement.</li> <li>Il existe plusieurs approches que vous pouvez employer à la maison afin de réduire les troubles de comportement.</li></ul>

 

 

Behaviour changes and brain tumours1341.00000000000Behaviour changes and brain tumoursBehaviour changes and brain tumoursBEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.0000000000000379.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning behavior changes you might see in your child during brain tumour treatment.</p><br><p>Many children who have a serious illness such as a brain tumour learn to adjust to their situation over time, with the right support. But like adults, children have good days and bad days. If your child is having a bad day, it may be hard to tell whether the cause is the tumour, the treatment or your child just being a child. Crying, anger, fussiness, acting out, tantrums or withdrawing can all be normal behaviours for children at certain times. Some children may show more serious behaviours, such as becoming depressed, anxious, not sleeping well, having problems with relationships or in school or refusing to have treatments. More serious behaviour changes need to be attended to quickly. Talk to your treatment team if you are concerned. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>It can be difficult to tell if your child's behaviour is due to the tumour, the treatment, or your child just being a child.</li> <li>More serious behaviour changes need to be attended to quickly and should be discussed with the treatment team.</li> <li>There are several approaches you can take at home to reduce problem behaviours.</li></ul><p>There are a number of possible causes to the behaviour changes you may see. Some of these include:</p> <ul><li>changes in routine</li> <li>fatigue, which can lead to irritability</li> <li>the stress caused by treatment, changes in appearances or issues in the family</li> <li>medications such as steroids (dexamethasone)</li> <li>damage to the parts of the brain that play a role in controlling emotions, behaviour, language or understanding social situations</li> <li>undiagnosed endocrine problems, such as low thyroid hormone levels, which can cause a depressed mood</li> <li>learning problems caused by radiation therapy.</li></ul> <h2>What can you do about changes in behaviour?</h2> <p>Talk to your child’s nurse, social worker, or child life specialist if you are concerned about your child's behaviour. They may be able to determine strategies to help you. There are several approaches you can take at home to reduce problem behaviours. </p> <ul><li>Stick to a routine when you can. Although life has become unpredictable, keeping to routines as much as possible will help because children thrive on routine. As your child's lifestyle changes, be open to establishing new routines.</li> <li>Develop a strategy to deal with inappropriate behaviour. For example, find alternative ways for your child to express their negative feelings or behaviours (for example “When you get angry, I would like you to...”) In some situations, ignoring the behaviour may be the best strategy. Too much attention can cause negative behaviours to increase.</li> <li>Recognize good behaviour when you see it. Recognition could involve special time set aside with parents.</li> <li>React to inappropriate behaviour with consequences that are suitable for your child’s age or development. The response should be prompt, consistent and clear.</li></ul> ​​​​https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/behaviour_changes_and_brain_tumours.jpgBehaviour changes and brain tumours

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