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Treatment of ependymomasTTreatment of ependymomasTreatment of ependymomasEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD11.000000000000042.0000000000000151.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth discussion of the treatment possibilities for a child with an ependymoma.<br></p><p>The first course of treatment is surgery. The goal is to remove as much of the tumour as possible. Surgeons consider surgery so important that they will sometimes accept that surgery may cause some damage when trying to remove the tumour completely. After surgery, children may have problems with swallowing, speech, balance, or coordination. They may experience double vision. If the tumour was in the section of the brain called the posterior fossa, they may experience a mutism called posterior fossa mutism, where they cannot speak for a period of time after the surgery. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Surgery is the primary treatment for ependymomas, and may be followed by a second surgery or radiation therapy.</li> <li>If a child is less than 12 months of age, chemotherapy may be given rather than radiotherapy, because of radiation’s long-term effect on the developing brain.</li> <li>For ependymomas, the outcome is better if the tumour is supratentorial (in the cerebrum), and if it can be completely removed during surgery.</li></ul>
Traitement des épendymomesTTraitement des épendymomesTreatment of ependymomasFrenchNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD11.000000000000042.0000000000000151.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Discussion approfondie sur les possibilités de traitement pour un enfant atteint d’un épendymome.<br></p><p>Le premier mode de traitement est la chirurgie. Le but consiste à retirer le plus possible de la tumeur. Les chirurgiens considèrent parfois que la chirurgie est tellement importante qu’ils acceptent les dommages causés en tentant de retirer complètement la tumeur. Après la chirurgie, les enfants pourraient avoir des troubles liés à la déglutition, la parole, l’équilibre ou la coordination. Ils pourraient voir en double. Si la tumeur se trouve dans la région de l’encéphale appelée la fosse postérieure, les enfants peuvent présenter un mutisme, nommé mutisme de la fosse postérieure, qui empêche la parole pendant un certain temps après la chirurgie. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’intervention chirurgicale est le premier mode de traitement des épendymomes et elle peut être suivie d’une seconde intervention chirurgicale ou d’une radiothérapie.</li> <li>Si un enfant est âgé de moins de 12 mois, on pourrait administrer de la chimiothérapie et non de la radiothérapie, en raison des effets à long terme des radiations sur l’encéphale en développement.</li> <li>Pour les épendymomes, le résultat est meilleur si la tumeur est sustentorielle (dans le cerveau) et si on peut la retirer entièrement pendant l’intervention chirurgicale.</li></ul>

 

 

Treatment of ependymomas1364.00000000000Treatment of ependymomasTreatment of ependymomasTEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD11.000000000000042.0000000000000151.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth discussion of the treatment possibilities for a child with an ependymoma.<br></p><p>The first course of treatment is surgery. The goal is to remove as much of the tumour as possible. Surgeons consider surgery so important that they will sometimes accept that surgery may cause some damage when trying to remove the tumour completely. After surgery, children may have problems with swallowing, speech, balance, or coordination. They may experience double vision. If the tumour was in the section of the brain called the posterior fossa, they may experience a mutism called posterior fossa mutism, where they cannot speak for a period of time after the surgery. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Surgery is the primary treatment for ependymomas, and may be followed by a second surgery or radiation therapy.</li> <li>If a child is less than 12 months of age, chemotherapy may be given rather than radiotherapy, because of radiation’s long-term effect on the developing brain.</li> <li>For ependymomas, the outcome is better if the tumour is supratentorial (in the cerebrum), and if it can be completely removed during surgery.</li></ul><h2>How is an ependymoma treated?</h2><p>Surgery is generally followed by radiation therapy, which is the use of high-energy X-rays, gamma rays, or electrons to destroy tumour cells. </p><p>In cases where the tumour was not removed completely, second-look surgery may be used before radiation is given. Second-look surgery is done to see the effect of treatment and try and remove more tumour if possible. It can be done within a few days after the first surgery or after a short course of chemotherapy. </p><p>There is a lack of information on the effectiveness of chemotherapy, which is the use of medicines that kill tumour cells.</p><p>If a child is less than 12 months of age, chemotherapy may be given rather than radiotherapy, because of radiation’s long-term effect on the developing brain. The chemotherapy is given to prevent the tumour from getting bigger. Some doctors will use radiotherapy when the child reaches one year. </p><p>If a child has hydrocephalus and the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is blocked, a shunt may be needed. </p><h2>What is the outcome for a child with an ependymoma?</h2><p>The outcome for a child with a brain tumour depends on many factors. These factors include the child’s age, the location of the tumour, whether it has spread, and how much has been removed in surgery. </p><p>For ependymomas, the outcome is better if the tumour is supratentorial (in the cerebrum), and if it can be completely removed during surgery. Five years after treatment, 50% to 70% of children with an ependymoma will survive. </p><p>For more information on ependymomas please see the following articles:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1313&language=English">Ependymomas </a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1327&language=English">Diagnosis of Ependymomas </a></li></ul><br>Treatment of ependymomas

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