Mental health and brain tumoursMMental health and brain tumoursMental health and brain tumoursEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z00Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth look at how a brain tumour can affect mental health.</p><p>Children and teenagers affected by brain tumours might experience difficulties with mood or behaviour, which may affect their relationships, ability to cope, and overall functioning. Concerns may include depression, anxiety, eating disorders, or problems with substance abuse. Other issues that may arise include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or learning disabilities. If you notice changes in your child’s mood or behaviour, or if you become concerned about attention or learning difficulties, consult your treatment team.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Children under stress may be at risk for depression and anxiety.</li> <li>Children affected by brain tumours may also be at risk for somatic complaints, substance abuse, eating disorders, ADHD, and learning disabilities.</li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor if you are concerned about your child's mental health.</li></ul>
Santé mentale et les tumeurs cérébralesSSanté mentale et les tumeurs cérébralesMental health and brain tumoursFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z00Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Aperçu approfondi sur la façon dont une tumeur au cerveau peut affecter la santé mentale.</p><p>Les enfants et les adolescents affectés par une tumeur cérébrale peuvent éprouver des difficultés liées à l’humeur ou au comportement, ce qui peut avoir une incidence sur leurs relations, leur capacité d’adaptation et leur fonctionnement en général. Les préoccupations peuvent comprendre la dépression, l’anxiété, les troubles de l’alimentation et l’abus d’alcool ou d’autres drogues. D’autres problèmes peuvent se manifester, dont le trouble d'hyperactivité avec déficit de l'attention (THADA) et les troubles d’apprentissage. Si vous observez des changements de l’humeur ou du comportement de votre enfant, ou si vous devenez préoccupés par des problèmes d’attention ou d’apprentissage, consultez votre équipe de traitement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les enfants stressés peuvent être susceptibles de faire de la dépression et de l’anxiété.</li> <li>Les enfants affectés de tumeurs cérébrales peuvent avoir des préoccupations somatiques, d’abus de substances, de troubles de l’alimentation, de trouble d'hyperactivité avec déficit de l'attention et de troubles d’apprentissage.</li> <li>Discutez avec le médecin de votre enfant si vous êtes préoccupé à propos de la santé mentale de ce dernier.</li></ul>

 

 

Mental health and brain tumours1384.00000000000Mental health and brain tumoursMental health and brain tumoursMEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z00Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth look at how a brain tumour can affect mental health.</p><p>Children and teenagers affected by brain tumours might experience difficulties with mood or behaviour, which may affect their relationships, ability to cope, and overall functioning. Concerns may include depression, anxiety, eating disorders, or problems with substance abuse. Other issues that may arise include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or learning disabilities. If you notice changes in your child’s mood or behaviour, or if you become concerned about attention or learning difficulties, consult your treatment team.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Children under stress may be at risk for depression and anxiety.</li> <li>Children affected by brain tumours may also be at risk for somatic complaints, substance abuse, eating disorders, ADHD, and learning disabilities.</li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor if you are concerned about your child's mental health.</li></ul><h2>Depression</h2> <p>Children under stress, such as those affected by brain tumours, may be at risk for depression. In children with cancer, depression is a sadness related to losses that are occurring or that have occurred in the past. But depression goes beyond normal sadness. Sadness can arise from temporary losses such as the loss of hair, to permanent losses such as the loss of mobility. Depression is when the sadness takes over to the point that the child only focuses on the losses and can no longer take any pleasure in life.</p> <p>Signs of depression may include:</p> <ul> <li> frequent sadness, tearfulness, crying </li> <li> decreased interest in activities; or inability to enjoy previously favourite activities </li> <li> hopelessness </li> <li> persistent boredom; low energy </li> <li> social isolation, poor communication </li> <li> low self esteem and guilt </li> <li> extreme sensitivity to rejection or failure </li> <li> increased irritability, anger, or hostility </li> <li> difficulty with relationships </li> <li> frequent complaints of physical illnesses such as headaches and stomachaches </li> <li> frequent absences from school or poor performance in school </li> <li> poor concentration </li> <li> a major change in eating and/or sleeping patterns </li> <li> talk of or efforts to run away from home </li> <li> thoughts or expressions of suicide or self destructive behaviour</li></ul> <p>If you notice signs of depression in your child, consult your treatment. Once diagnosed, depression can be treated with medications and/or counseling.</p> <h2>Anxiety</h2> <p>Anxious children are often overly tense or uptight. Some may seek a lot of reassurance, and their worries may interfere with activities. Children with cancer may feel anxious because they fear their cancer will get worse. Cancer survivors may feel anxious because they are worried that the cancer will come back or that other symptoms will occur. If they become too anxious, they may avoid seeking appropriate health care because they are afraid of knowing.</p> <p>Symptoms of anxiety may include:</p> <ul> <li> many worries about things before they happen </li> <li> constant worries or concerns about family, school, friends, or activities </li> <li> repetitive, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) or actions (compulsions) </li> <li> fears of embarrassment or making mistakes </li> <li> low self esteem and lack of self-confidence</li></ul> <p>If you notice signs of anxiety in your child, consult your treatment team. Once diagnosed, anxiety can be treated with medications and/or counseling.</p> <h2>Somatic complaints</h2> <p>Children affected by brain tumours may have somatic concerns, which are unexplained physical complaints that are actually caused by depression or anxiety. For example, they may worry about the tumour growing back and the worry may cause them to have stomach aches or headaches. If you notice unexplained physical complaints in your child, consult your treatment team.</p> <h2>Substance abuse</h2> <p>Teenagers may turn to alcohol or drugs in an attempt to fit in with their peers or as a form of self-medication for anxiety or depression.</p> <p>Warning signs of teenage alcohol and drug abuse may include:</p> <ul> <li> Physical: fatigue, repeated health complaints, red and glazed eyes, and a lasting cough. </li> <li> Emotional: personality change, sudden mood changes, irritability, irresponsible behavior, low self-esteem, poor judgment, depression, and a general lack of interest. </li> <li> Family: starting arguments, breaking rules, or withdrawing from the family. </li> <li> School: decreased interest, negative attitude, drop in grades, many absences, truancy, and discipline problems. </li> <li> Social problems: new friends who are less interested in standard home and school activities, problems with the law.</li></ul> <p>If you have concerns, consult your treatment team.</p> <h2>Eating disorders</h2> <p>If your child is on steroids, they may have an increased appetite which may lead them to gain weight. As a result, body image and eating disorders may become a concern. Disordered eating may be also occur as a result of poor appetite or taste sensitivities.</p> <h3>Anorexia and bulimia</h3> <p>Anorexia and bulimia are eating disorders that cause sufferers to become obsessed with being thin. They lose a lot of weight and are afraid to gain weight. They think they look fat even if they are very thin. People with anorexia starve themselves, avoid high-calorie foods, and exercise compulsively. People with bulimia eat regular amounts of food, but they make themselves throw up shortly after eating, and they use laxatives and water pills to try to lose weight.</p> <p>Many adolescents with eating disorders also suffer from other problems; including depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. It is important to recognize and get appropriate treatment for these problems as well.</p> <h2>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</h2> <p>ADHD is a major concern in children who have been exposed to radiation therapy. The symptoms of ADHD include inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.</p> <p>There are three subtypes of ADHD. Depending on his symptoms, a child may be diagnosed with:</p> <ul> <li> Predominantly hyperactive/impulsive subtype: few or no inattentive symptoms. This subtype is rare compared to the others </li> <li> Predominantly inattentive subtype: few or no hyperactive symptoms </li> <li> Combined subtype: both inattentive and hyperactive symptoms</li></ul> <p>Once diagnosed, ADHD can be treated with behavioural therapy and/or medications. An individual education plan can be put in place to help obtain any accommodations that may be needed at school.</p> <h2>Learning disabilities</h2> <p>If you are concerned that your child is having problems with learning, consult your treatment team. If your child is diagnosed with learning disabilities, an individual education plan can be put in place to help them obtain any accommodations they need at school. For more information, see the “Learning and Education” section of this resource centre.</p> <h2>Resources</h2> <p>American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: <a href="http://www.aacap.org/">www.aacap.org</a>. Provides Facts for Families on various mental health issues and conditions.</p> <p>National Cancer Institute: <a href="http://www.cancer.gov/">www.cancer.gov</a>. Type “mental health” or a more specific mental health topic into the search box to find numerous articles on mental health and cancer.</p> <p>Children’s Mental Health Ontario: <a href="http://www.kidsmentalhealth.ca/">www.kidsmentalhealth.ca</a>.</p> <p>Canadian Mental Health Association: <a href="http://www.cmha.ca/">www.cmha.ca</a>.</p> <p>National Institute of Mental Health: <a href="http://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml">www.nihm.nih.gov</a>.</p>Mental health and brain tumours

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.