Palliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's carePPalliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's carePalliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's careEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKaren Drybrough, RN, MScN Ute Bartels, MD Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CNFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on managing palliative care, from providing comfort to skin care. Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Delivering comfort to your child is the main goal of palliative care. Many children will require pain relief with medications. Non-pharmacological methods such as relaxation, guided imagery, hyponosis, and other techniques are excellent tools for providing comfort and pain relief. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Parents can help care for their children by advocating for them, caring for their skin and preventing pressure ulcers.</li> <li>While you may be able to provide some level of care for your child, you may eventually need to ask for help to make your child as comfortable as possible.</li></ul>
Soins palliatifs pour les tumeurs cérébrales : Gérer les soins palliatifs de votre enfantSSoins palliatifs pour les tumeurs cérébrales : Gérer les soins palliatifs de votre enfantPalliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's careFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKaren Drybrough, RN, MScNUte Bartels, MDLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CNFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements approfondis sur la gestion des soins palliatifs, de la prestation de confort aux soins de la peau. Réponses des hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Le principal objectif des soins palliatifs est d’offrir un confort à votre enfant. Bon nombre d’enfants auront besoin d’un soulagement de la douleur au moyen de médicaments. Des méthodes non pharmaceutiques telles que la relaxation, le rêve éveillé dirigé, l’hypnose et d’autres techniques constituent d’excellents outils pour réconforter l’enfant et atténuer sa douleur.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les parents peuvent favoriser les soins de leurs enfants en les représentant auprès de l’équipe soignante, en prenant soin de leur peau et en prévenant les plaies de pression.</li> <li>Bien que vous soyez en mesure d’offrir un certain niveau de soin à votre enfant, il peut arriver un moment où vous devrez demander de l’aide afin de rendre votre enfant aussi confortable que possible.</li></ul>

 

 

Palliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's care1390.00000000000Palliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's carePalliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's carePEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKaren Drybrough, RN, MScN Ute Bartels, MD Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CNFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on managing palliative care, from providing comfort to skin care. Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Delivering comfort to your child is the main goal of palliative care. Many children will require pain relief with medications. Non-pharmacological methods such as relaxation, guided imagery, hyponosis, and other techniques are excellent tools for providing comfort and pain relief. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Parents can help care for their children by advocating for them, caring for their skin and preventing pressure ulcers.</li> <li>While you may be able to provide some level of care for your child, you may eventually need to ask for help to make your child as comfortable as possible.</li></ul><h2>How do you manage your child's symptoms?</h2> <p>Your child's doctor will direct what medication your child should receive. Your role will be to ensure that the child is indeed getting the drugs and that they are effective. If they are not, alert the doctor or clinic nurse so that the medication can be altered. </p> <p>You will also need to observe any changes in your child's body, such as skin infections, other skin changes, respiratory changes, and nasal symptoms, which are increased secretions from the nose, throat, and mouth. They may experience nausea and vomiting. They may also have trouble emptying their bladder or bowel which may result in constipation or incontinence (difficulty holding urine or bowel movements). Your child may not be able to control those functions and may realize this loss of control. Take care not to embarrass them. Keeping clean sheets will help to comfort them. </p> <p>Undisturbed, comfortable sleep is very important during this time for your child and also for yourself. Anxiety, visitors, discomfort, and restlessness can disturb sleep. It helps to establish a daily routine including naptimes, visitor schedule, and bedtime. </p> <p>A gradual loss of interest in eating is often a normal part of the dying process.</p> <h2>What role does nutrition play during end-of-life care?</h2> <p>Good nutrition needs to be a real focus in the early active phase to maintain an optimum level of nutrition and comfort. Your child may have difficulty eating and may require a feeding tube or enriched nutrition. In the final stages of end-of-life, however, when the body shuts slowly down, your child's appetite and thirst will decrease. This is a natural process. In this stage, enriched feeding may not be recommended. </p> <p>Here are some general principles:</p> <ul> <li> Your child's desire to eat and drink in the final stages of life will diminish. This is a normal process when body functions are shutting down. </li> <li> In terminal illness, normal nutrition is disadvantageous and may aggravate symptoms.</li> <li> What your child enjoys becomes more important than reasoning with their about nutrition.</li> <li> Refrain from commenting on the amount your child eats.</li> <li> Food smells can sometimes be bothersome to those who are dying. Be sensitive to this when preparing meals.</li> <li> Remember that eating is about enjoying the meal together. Focus less on what is eaten and more on the time you spend together with your child. </li></ul> <h2>How do you look after your child's skin?</h2> <p>Pressure is put on the skin when the child sits or lies on bony areas like the hips or back. This pressure comes from the weight of the body. The pressure can be great enough to cut off the blood flow to the skin, muscle, and fat under the skin. Without blood flow, oxygen and food cannot reach the area. The skin then begins to die. When skin dies, a sore is formed. The sore is called a pressure sore, ulcer, or bed sore. </p> <p>A pressure ulcer usually starts out as a red area or blister on the skin. It may progress to a small ulcer the size of a quarter or a very large hole that covers the entire area around the bone. </p> <p>A child can develop a pressure ulcer at any age. Children who are most susceptible include those who:</p> <ul> <li> have little or no feeling in a part of their body</li> <li> stay in one position without moving frequently</li> <li> are malnourished</li> <li> have spasms in a body part that causes constant rubbing on the skin</li> <li> have skin that is frequently wet from urine, stool, or sweat</li> <li> have fragile, easily damaged skin</li></ul> <p>Children who are confined to bed or a wheelchair can develop bed sores on bony prominences such as the tailbone, ankles, elbows, hips, buttocks, and the back of the head. </p> <p>Avoid heating pads and hot packs as they can lead to burns, especially if your child is on narcotics, which can cause a decreased level of consciousness. Ice packs can burn the skin as well. </p> <h2>Preventing pressure ulcers</h2> <p>Trying to prevent pressure ulcers will be an important part of your child's palliative care.</p> <h3>Checking your child's body</h3> <p>Inspect all parts of the child’s skin where there are areas of pressure, or decreased or no feeling. Look for red or dark areas, scrapes, bruises, or sores. Inspect your child's skin at least once a day. Report any findings to your child's treatment team. </p> <p>If your child wears diapers, make sure they are changed frequently. Keep the skin clean and dry. If appropriate, check with your child’s doctor about a bowel or bladder training program so that the child will not need diapers. </p> <h3>Decreasing the pressure</h3> <p>As long as your child is still active and mainly out of bed, pressure ulcers will not occur. However, once your child becomes bed-ridden, make sure your child changes positions frequently. </p> <p>Review with your treatment team the best options available for the type of bed your child will use.</p> <p>Some children will benefit from having a trapeze or overhead bar to help her change position or transfer into and out of bed.</p> <p>Your treatment team, including a physiotherapist or occupational therapy, can also make recommendations about wheelchair options and other forms of support. </p> <h3>Nutrition</h3> <p>Make sure your child has a balanced diet that includes drinking lots of fluids. Your child should not become overweight or underweight. Both of these extremes increase the pressure on the skin. </p> <h2>When should you call for help?</h2> <p>Call for help if your child is in pain and you can't get them comfortable, if they are having trouble breathing, if they have fallen, if they are unable to take their medication, or if you feel you can't continue caring for them at home or if you need more support. </p>Palliative care for brain tumours: Managing your child's care

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