Fever during brain tumour treatmentFFever during brain tumour treatmentFever during brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000056.0000000000000291.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information on what to do in the event of your child running a fever during brain tumour treatment, such as when to call your doctor.</p><p>When your child is away from the hospital, you become their primary caregiver. You have a responsibility to contact the treatment team if your child presents with specific problems. In children on active treatment, the most common unexpected complications are fever and neutropenia. Fever is a temperature above 38.3°C (101°F). It may be accompanied by headache, shaking from chills, confusion, skin rash, or loss of appetitie. Fever is especially a concern if your child is receiving chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul>Fever may be caused by: bacterial or viral infections; immune system-weakening drugs; the tumour; drug allergies; or blood transfusions.</li> <li>Call your child’s doctor if their fever reaches 38.3°C (101°F) or higher.</li> <li>The doctor will determine the cause of the fever before treating it.</li></ul>
Fièvre et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesFFièvre et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesFever during brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000056.0000000000000291.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Information importante sur ce qu’il faut faire quand votre enfant fait de la fièvre pendant le traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale, comme quand appeler le médecin.</p><p>Chez les enfants qui reçoivent un traitement actif, les complications inattendues les plus fréquentes sont la fièvre et la neutropénie. La fièvre s’entend d’une température supérieure à 38,3 °C (101 °F). Elle peut être accompagnée de céphalées, de tremblements provenant de frissons, de confusion, d’éruptions cutanées ou de perte d’appétit. La fièvre est particulièrement préoccupante si votre enfant reçoit de la chimiothérapie, de la radiothérapie ou des stéroïdes. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul>La fièvre peut être causée par des infections bactériennes ou virales, des médicaments affaiblissant le système immunitaire, la tumeur elle-même, des allergies aux médicaments et des transfusions sanguines. <li>Appelez le médecin de votre enfant si la fièvre atteint 38,3 °C (101 °F) ou plus.</li> <li>Le médecin déterminera la cause de la fièvre avant de la traiter.</li></ul>

 

 

Fever during brain tumour treatment1397.00000000000Fever during brain tumour treatmentFever during brain tumour treatmentFEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000056.0000000000000291.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information on what to do in the event of your child running a fever during brain tumour treatment, such as when to call your doctor.</p><p>When your child is away from the hospital, you become their primary caregiver. You have a responsibility to contact the treatment team if your child presents with specific problems. In children on active treatment, the most common unexpected complications are fever and neutropenia. Fever is a temperature above 38.3°C (101°F). It may be accompanied by headache, shaking from chills, confusion, skin rash, or loss of appetitie. Fever is especially a concern if your child is receiving chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul>Fever may be caused by: bacterial or viral infections; immune system-weakening drugs; the tumour; drug allergies; or blood transfusions.</li> <li>Call your child’s doctor if their fever reaches 38.3°C (101°F) or higher.</li> <li>The doctor will determine the cause of the fever before treating it.</li></ul> <h2>What causes fever?</h2> <p>Bacterial or viral infections often cause fever. The body raises its temperature in an effort to kill off the bacteria or virus. Infection can also arise after surgery. </p> <p>Some cancer drugs can weaken the immune system and cause fever:</p> <ul> <li> chemotherapy drugs </li> <li> biological response modifiers such as interferon or interleukin</li> <li> radiation to the brain and spine, called craniospinal radiation</li></ul> <p>Other causes of fever may include:</p> <ul> <li> the tumour itself </li> <li> drug allergies</li> <li> blood transfusions</li></ul> <h2>When should I call the doctor?</h2> <p>Call your child’s doctor if their fever reaches 38.3°C (101°F) or higher. If you are unsure whether the fever is serious, err on the side of caution and make that call. Take note of any other symptoms, such as headache, shaking from chills, confusion, skin rash or loss of appetite. It is especially important to call the doctor if your child is receiving chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. </p> <p>Your child’s doctor will determine the cause of the fever before treating it. If there is an infection, your child may receive antibiotics. If the fever is due to chemotherapy or other medications, they may need a change in their dosage or medication routine. </p> <p>You can make your child more comfortable by giving them plenty of liquid to drink, covering them with a blanket if they are chilly, placing a cool washcloth on their forehead if they feel warm, and making sure they get lots of rest. Do not give them aspirin or other medication unless directed to do so by their doctor. </p>Fever during brain tumour treatment

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