Seizures during brain tumour treatmentSSeizures during brain tumour treatmentSeizures and brain tumoursEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC Ute Bartels, MD10.000000000000042.0000000000000388.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth guide to dealing with your child experiencing seizures as a result of a brain tumour, or as a reaction to brain tumour surgery.</p><p>Your child may have had seizures, which could have led to their diagnosis. They may also have seizures for the first time after surgery. Seeing this can be a frightening experience for you and your family. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>A seizure occurs when the electrical signals between nerve cells in the brain are disrupted or become too strong.</li> <li>In most cases, the best thing to do is watch closely if your child is having a seizure.</li> <li>Most seizures associated with brain tumours can be controlled by anti-seizure drugs.</li></ul>
Crises d’épilepsie et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesCCrises d’épilepsie et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesSeizures and brain tumoursFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD10.000000000000042.0000000000000388.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Guide approfondi sur la façon de composer avec les crises d’épilepsie de votre enfant en raison d’une tumeur cérébrale ou à la suite d’une chirurgie pour retirer une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>Votre enfant pourrait faire des crises, qui ont peut-être mené à son diagnostic. Il pourrait aussi faire des crises pour la première fois après la chirurgie. En être témoins pourrait faire peur à vous et votre famille. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Une crise d’épilepsie se produit lorsque les signaux électriques entre les neurones de l’encéphale sont interrompus ou deviennent trop forts.</li> <li>Dans la plupart des cas, la meilleure chose à faire est de surveiller de près votre enfant s’il fait une crise d’épilepsie.</li> <li>La plupart des crises d’épilepsie associées aux tumeurs cérébrales peuvent être traitées par des médicaments antiépileptiques.</li></ul>

 

 

Seizures during brain tumour treatment1399.00000000000Seizures during brain tumour treatmentSeizures and brain tumoursSEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC Ute Bartels, MD10.000000000000042.0000000000000388.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth guide to dealing with your child experiencing seizures as a result of a brain tumour, or as a reaction to brain tumour surgery.</p><p>Your child may have had seizures, which could have led to their diagnosis. They may also have seizures for the first time after surgery. Seeing this can be a frightening experience for you and your family. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>A seizure occurs when the electrical signals between nerve cells in the brain are disrupted or become too strong.</li> <li>In most cases, the best thing to do is watch closely if your child is having a seizure.</li> <li>Most seizures associated with brain tumours can be controlled by anti-seizure drugs.</li></ul><h2>What is a seizure?</h2> <p>Normally the nerve cells in the brain send messages to each other using electrical signals. If these signals are disrupted or they become too strong, a seizure happens. </p> <p>There are different types of seizures. Some more common symptoms you might see are: </p> <ul> <li> Uncontrollable muscle movement. This could include blinking, face twitching, shaking of a hand or foot, and jerking movements</li> <li> A blank look and loss of connection with reality</li> <li> Mood changes, such as crying or laughing</li> <li> Loss of consciousness; this may be as subtle as sensing a bad smell or a bad taste for a few seconds</li></ul> <p>Seizures do not usually last for more than a few minutes, but their effects can last for several hours. Your child may feel confused or sleepy, and have headaches or sore muscles. </p> <h3>What to do</h3> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">What To Do if Someone Has a Seizure</span> <img /> </figure> <p>In most cases, the best thing to do is watch closely if your child is having a seizure.</p> <p>Here are some ideas that may help you:</p> <ul> <li> Keep calm and reassure your child.</li> <li> Protect your child from any injury if possible. Move hard or sharp objects away, but do not get in the way of your child’s movements. Turn your child to the side to allow saliva to come out of the mouth. </li> <li> Do not force anything in your child’s mouth . This could cause teeth and jaw damage. Your child will not swallow their tongue during a seizure. </li> <li> Comfort and talk gently to your child after the seizure has ended. It may take some time for them to become reoriented.</li> <li> Call for medical help if the seizure continues for longer than five minutes.</li></ul> <p>For more information about how to help, scroll through the "What to Do if Someone Has a Seizure" click through. </p> <h2>Treating seizures</h2> <p>Most seizures associated with brain tumours can be controlled by anti-seizure drugs. They are called anticonvulsants or antiepileptic drugs. Your child’s doctor will prescribe the right type based on the type of seizure your child has. </p> <p>Your treatment team will tell you about the common side effects for the drugs your child is taking.</p> <h2>Important information about anti-seizure drugs</h2> <p>Many medicines —even ones you can buy over-the-counter — can have an effect on the drugs your child is taking. Make sure your child’s doctor or nurse knows about all the drugs your child is taking. Check with the team before giving any new drugs. </p> <p>Do not stop giving your child the drugs or change the dose without talking to your child’s treatment team. The dose of the drug needs to be high enough to prevent a seizure. </p>Seizures during brain tumour treatment

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