Losing weight during brain tumour treatmentLLosing weight during brain tumour treatmentLosing weight during brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Digestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZMary Barron, MSc, RDFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning the issues that may arise if your child loses too much weight as a side effect of her brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Your dietician may recommend ways to boost the energy in the food your child is eating. The goal with energy boosting is to give children more calories through their food and drink than they would get normally. This helps children gain weight and raise energy levels without increasing the amount of food they eat. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>High-energy diets help provide children with more calories through their food and drink than they would normally receive.</li> <li>If your child is not eating enough food to maintain their weight, the dietitian, nurse, or doctor may recommend using a nutritional supplement.</li></ul>
Perdre du poids et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesPPerdre du poids et le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesLosing weight during brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Digestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZMary Barron, MSc, RDFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements approfondis sur les problèmes qui pourraient survenir si votre enfant perd trop de poids dans le cadre des effets indésirables de son traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>Votre diététiste peut recommander des façons d’augmenter l’apport énergétique des aliments consommés par votre enfant. Le but consiste à donner aux enfants plus de calories qu’à l’habitude dans ce qu’ils mangent et boivent. Les enfants peuvent ainsi gagner du poids et avoir de meilleurs niveaux d’énergie sans manger plus qu’avant. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Une alimentation à haut apport énergétique aide à offrir davantage de calories à votre enfant par sa nourriture et ses boissons qu’il ne recevrait en temps normal.</li> <li>Si votre enfant ne mange pas suffisamment d’aliments pour maintenir son poids, un nutritionniste, un infirmier ou un médecin pourrait recommander l’utilisation de suppléments nutritifs.</li></ul>

 

 

Losing weight during brain tumour treatment1401.00000000000Losing weight during brain tumour treatmentLosing weight during brain tumour treatmentLEnglishNeurology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Digestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZMary Barron, MSc, RDFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning the issues that may arise if your child loses too much weight as a side effect of her brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Your dietician may recommend ways to boost the energy in the food your child is eating. The goal with energy boosting is to give children more calories through their food and drink than they would get normally. This helps children gain weight and raise energy levels without increasing the amount of food they eat. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>High-energy diets help provide children with more calories through their food and drink than they would normally receive.</li> <li>If your child is not eating enough food to maintain their weight, the dietitian, nurse, or doctor may recommend using a nutritional supplement.</li></ul><h2>High energy diets for infants:</h2> <p>The foods at the top of this list are higher in energy, and the ones near the bottom are lower in energy. Introduce solids foods as discussed with your treatment team. </p> <ul> <li> breast milk or formula (high in energy)</li> <li> infant cereal </li> <li> strained meats</li> <li> baby foods labeled “meat with vegetables“ have fewer calories than meat alone</li> <li> baby foods labeled “vegetables with meat“ have fewer calories than “meat with vegetables“</li> <li> strained desserts, yogurts, and custards (they have more calories than strained fruit alone)</li> <li> pureed or mashed fruits</li> <li> pureed or mashed vegetables (low in energy)</li></ul> <h2>High-energy diet for kids and teens</h2> <ul> <li> Serve whole (homogenized) or chocolate milk.</li> <li> Offer three meals and two or three snacks each day. Avoid grazing.</li> <li> Avoid giving tea and coffee, since they have no calories.</li></ul> <h2>For kids and teens, use any of the following:</h2> <ul> <li> butter and margarine: add to soup, rice, noodles, cooked vegetables, potatoes, sauces</li> <li> sour cream: add to soup, potatoes, vegetables, salad dressings and use as a dip for fruits or vegetables</li> <li> whipped cream: use sweetened on desserts, pudding, fruits, pancakes, or waffles</li> <li> yogurt (minimum 4% butterfat): add to fruit, desserts, use on cereal, waffles, pancakes</li> <li> cheese (30% or higher milk fat): use on crackers, sandwiches, hamburgers, meats, fish. Grate and add to sauces, casseroles, rice, potatoes, noodles, vegetable dishes. </li> <li> peanut butter: spread on sandwiches, muffins, crackers, waffles, pancakes, fruit slices. Blend with drinks, use with ice cream or yogurt. </li> <li> nuts (for children over four years old): serve as snacks, add to ice cream, yogurt, pudding, pancakes, waffles</li> <li> meat or fish: add small pieces to vegetables, salads, casseroles, soups, omelettes, or noodles</li> <li> ice cream</li></ul> <p>Your child's dietitian can provide you with booklets containing more information. </p> <h2>Nutritional supplements</h2> <p>If your child is not eating enough food to maintain their weight, the dietitian, nurse, or doctor may recommend using a nutritional supplement. Supplements come as a powder, liquid, or in a pudding. Different flavours are available. Supplements provide extra protein and/or energy. </p> <h2>Using nutrition supplements with success</h2> <p>It can be difficult to get your child used to drinking a supplement. Some supplements are too sweet. Some are too thick. Your child may also get tired of the same thing all the time. Here are some suggestions to help: </p> <ul> <li> Add whole (homogenized) milk to the supplement to make it less sweet</li> <li> Keep the supplements in the refrigerator. They taste better cold.</li> <li> Add ice cream or sherbet to make the supplement taste like a milkshake.</li> <li> Add fresh, canned, or frozen fruit such as strawberries, bananas, or peaches to the supplement.</li> <li> Freeze the supplement in a small bowl or paper cup. Your child can eat it with a spoon like frozen yogurt.</li> <li> Freeze the supplement in an ice cube tray. Your child can suck on the cubes.</li> <li> If your child does not like the texture of the supplement, talk to the dietitian about pudding or bar supplements. Another idea is to add cooked rice or tapioca to the supplement. </li></ul>Losing weight during brain tumour treatment

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