Speech therapy after brain tumour surgerySSpeech therapy after brain tumour surgerySpeech therapy after brain tumour surgeryEnglishNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000076.0000000000000693.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on the speech problems that can arise as a result of brain tumour treatment, and the ways that speech therapy can help.</p><p>Transient cerebellar mutism is a potential complication for children who undergo surgery for a posterior fossa tumour. This type of tumour is located in the back part of the brain. Mutism occurs in about one out of every five to 10 cases of an operation to a tumour in this part of the brain. It results in the child being unable to speak. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Mutism is a potential complication of brain surgery that will improve over time.</li> <li>Do not force your child to speak as they may be unable to and it may frustrate or upset them</li> <li>A speech and language test will be conducted before and after the operation to assess differences in talking and listening.</li></ul>
Orthophonie après chirurgie pour une tumeur cérébraleOOrthophonie après chirurgie pour une tumeur cérébraleSpeech therapy after brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000076.0000000000000693.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements approfondis au sujet des problèmes de la parole qui pourraient survenir en raison du traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale et des façons dont l’orthophonie peut aider.</p><p>Le mutisme passager est une complication possible pour les enfants qui subissent une chirurgie pour une tumeur située dans la fosse postérieure. Ce type de tumeur se trouve dans la partie arrière de l'encéphale. Le mutisme se produit dans un cas sur cinq ou dix d'opération pour une tumeur située dans cette partie de l'encéphale. Il en résulte que l’enfant est incapable de parler. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le mutisme est une complication possible des interventions chirurgicales au cerveau qui s’améliorera avec le temps.</li> <li>Ne forcez pas votre enfant à parler, car il peut en être incapable et cela pourrait le frustrer et le contrarier.</li> <li>Un examen de la parole et du langage sera réalisé avant et après l’opération afin d’évaluer les changements de la parole et de l’écoute.</li></ul>

 

 

Speech therapy after brain tumour surgery1407.00000000000Speech therapy after brain tumour surgerySpeech therapy after brain tumour surgerySEnglishNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000076.0000000000000693.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on the speech problems that can arise as a result of brain tumour treatment, and the ways that speech therapy can help.</p><p>Transient cerebellar mutism is a potential complication for children who undergo surgery for a posterior fossa tumour. This type of tumour is located in the back part of the brain. Mutism occurs in about one out of every five to 10 cases of an operation to a tumour in this part of the brain. It results in the child being unable to speak. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Mutism is a potential complication of brain surgery that will improve over time.</li> <li>Do not force your child to speak as they may be unable to and it may frustrate or upset them</li> <li>A speech and language test will be conducted before and after the operation to assess differences in talking and listening.</li></ul><h2>Mutism</h2><p>This mutism will improve over time. However, will often be frustrating and difficult for your child and for you. It is important to know that others have been through the same experience. You may find it helpful to get in touch with other parents for support. </p><p>Mutism is part of a larger set of problems. This is called a syndrome. Some of the other symptoms you may notice in your child are: </p><ul><li> changes in behaviour </li><li> emotional difficulties </li><li> cortical blindness: their eyes may work fine, but their brain isn’t seeing images </li><li> ataxia: they may not be able to balance while walking </li><li> extreme irritability: they may kick and scream for hours, even though you try hard to calm them down </li></ul><h3>How long will the mutism last?</h3><p>While the other symptoms described above may improve, mutism can last much longer, possibly many months. As soon as your child does start to say some words — even if they are hard to understand — it will not be long before they will be able to speak in sentences again. </p><h3>Will my child recover completely?</h3><p>All children will be able to speak again, but they may not speak in the same way as they did before the operation. There may be some problems such as slurred speech, slowness, or stuttering. A speech-language pathologist will work with your child to help them improve. </p><h3>How do I communicate with my child?</h3><p>It is best not to try and force your child to speak. They may not be physically able to say any words. Forcing speech will only frustrate them. You can find other ways to communicate. A speech-language pathologist or other experts may be available to help you. </p><p>Often, you can begin by finding a signal that your child can use to mean “yes” and “no.” For example, one thumb up could mean “yes” and a thumb down could mean “no.” Another example is getting them to squeeze your hands: one time for “yes”, two times for “no." It is also helpful to speak to your child in simple sentences that ask for a “yes” or “no” answer, for example, “Are you cold?” or “Do you want a blanket?” </p><p>Your child’s treatment team may provide a picture board so that your child can communicate by pointing to pictures, or spell out words by pointing to letters. These picture boards can be created and changed to meet the needs of your child. </p><p>For more information on communication with your child if they have mutism, see the PDF booklet: "<a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Staying-Connected.PDF">Staying Connected</a>".</p><h2>Speech and language test</h2><p>Your child may have had a half-day speech and language test conducted before and after their operation, to see if the way your child talks or listens has changed. A speech assessment is a complete test of your child’s ability to talk, listen, and move the muscles of the face needed for talking. Another speech and language test may be done again in the future to make sure that they are getting better. </p><h3>Preparing for a speech and language test</h3><p>Tell your child that the speech-language pathologist is coming to help them talk and listen. Tell them that they will do some jobs with the speech-language pathologist, and that they must try to do their best. The jobs are a little bit like school work. Your child will get to look at pictures, tell stories, and make funny faces with the speech-language pathologist. </p><p>Here are some of the things that are part of the test.</p><ul><li>You as parents will be asked questions about your child.</li><li>Your child’s facial muscles will be examined. The examiner will test the strength, speed and muscle movement of your child’s tongue, jaw and lips. Your child may be asked to smile, pucker their lips, move their tongue around, and say some funny sounds.</li><li>Your child’s ability to tell stories, explain things, and their vocabulary knowledge may also be tested.</li><li>Sometimes your child will be videotaped or audiotaped.</li></ul> ​Speech therapy after brain tumour surgery

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