Quality of life for brain tumour survivorsQQuality of life for brain tumour survivorsQuality of life for brain tumour survivorsEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN Heather Young, MSW, RSW Claire Desouza, BSc, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000066.0000000000000507.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information for predicting how impactful a brain tumour and treatment will be on your child's future quality of life</p><p>One of the more difficult things to predict after recovery from a brain tumour is how well a child will do in everyday life. Will they still be able to finish high school? Will they be able to live on their own? How difficult will it be for them to find a job? The answers to these questions are not clear. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Research has shown that there is a greater risk of problems depending on the location of the tumour, if radiation was given at a young age, types of medical conditions, and vision or hearing problems.</li> <li>Seek support from other parents and and support groups, enroll your child in special programs or camps, and closely follow their progress in school.</li></ul>
Qualité de vie pour survivants de tumeurs cérébralesQQualité de vie pour survivants de tumeurs cérébralesQuality of life for brain tumour survivorsFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CNHeather Young, MSW, RSWClaire Desouza, BSc, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000066.0000000000000507.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements importants sur la prévision de la gravité des répercussions d’une tumeur cérébrale et de son traitement sur la qualité de la vie à venir de votre enfant.</p><p>Une des choses les plus difficiles à prédire est la mesure dans laquelle un enfant se débrouillera dans la vie quotidienne. Pourra-t-il finir l’école secondaire? Pourra-t-il vivre seul un jour? À quel point aura-t-il de la difficulté à se trouver un emploi? Les réponses à ces questions ne sont pas nettes. Des chercheurs ont observé des enfants et des adultes afin d’étudier les questions que les parents pourraient poser sur la qualité de vie, la santé mentale en général et les aptitudes sociales.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La recherche a démontré qu’il existe un plus grand risque de problèmes en fonction de la localisation de la tumeur, en fonction de l'âge qu'avait l'enfant lors de sa de la radiothérapie, en fonction des types de troubles médicaux et des problèmes de vision ou d’audition.</li> <li>Confiez-vous à d’autres parents et à des groupes de soutien, inscrivez votre enfant dans des programmes ou des camps particuliers et suivez étroitement ses progrès à l’école.</li></ul>

 

 

Quality of life for brain tumour survivors1422.00000000000Quality of life for brain tumour survivorsQuality of life for brain tumour survivorsQEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN Heather Young, MSW, RSW Claire Desouza, BSc, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000066.0000000000000507.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information for predicting how impactful a brain tumour and treatment will be on your child's future quality of life</p><p>One of the more difficult things to predict after recovery from a brain tumour is how well a child will do in everyday life. Will they still be able to finish high school? Will they be able to live on their own? How difficult will it be for them to find a job? The answers to these questions are not clear. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Research has shown that there is a greater risk of problems depending on the location of the tumour, if radiation was given at a young age, types of medical conditions, and vision or hearing problems.</li> <li>Seek support from other parents and and support groups, enroll your child in special programs or camps, and closely follow their progress in school.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="" /> </figure> <p>Some researchers have looked at children and adults to study the questions that parents might ask about quality of life, overall mental health, and social skills. These types of research studies have three general goals:</p> <ul> <li>to understand the impact of the tumour on a person’s life</li> <li>to be able to predict how a person will do in the future</li> <li>to develop strategies to prevent or deal with problems in individuals who might be at higher risk of having difficulties.</li></ul> <p>One issue for the long term is that everybody might have different ideas about what makes a life successful. For some parents, it might not matter so much if their child who survived a brain tumour attends college or university. They may be proud if their child accomplished other goals such as living on their own and holding down a part-time job. Other parents may find it difficult to adjust to the fact that their child will not attend university.</p> <p>In general, researchers have shown that there may be a greater risk of problems in the following situations. Identifying these problems can help experts find ways to help affected children meet their full potential. Problems may be greater for children who have:</p> <ul><li>tumours located in the upper part of the brain (supratentorial tumours)</li> <li>tumours located outside the third ventricle </li> <li>tumours of the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region</li> <li>radiation therapy, especially at a younger age </li> <li>ongoing medical problems such as endocrine conditions </li> <li>vision or hearing problems. </li></ul> <h2>What can be done to help a child after a brain tumour?</h2> <p>Your treatment team is a good source of information. The team includes social workers and psychologists who can help with some of these challenges. They may be able to offer advice or suggest programs and supports in the community. </p> <p>School is very important to help children learn social skills, so it's important to try to keep your child going to school regularly. </p> <p>As your child grows, you’ll learn the issues they face at different stages and what may become barriers to schooling, work and social situations. You can take the lead in seeing what works for your child at each stage. </p> <p>It can also be helpful to talk to other parents with experience and see what works for them. Consider support groups for children with cancer, special needs, learning disabilities or brain injuries. They can provide ideas to help your child, even if the issues are not exactly the same. </p> <p>There are also programs or camps for children with special needs or cancer. They provide a supportive social environment, help your child develop their skills and interests and some may offer life skills training programs. ​</p>Quality of life for brain tumour survivors

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.