Secondary cancer after a brain tumourSSecondary cancer after a brain tumourSecondary cancer after a brain tumourEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000052.0000000000000458.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information concerning the occurance of secondary cancer in your child. Trusted Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Some treatments carry a small risk that a new tumour or cancer will develop. This risk is higher than the general population, but it is still quite low. The risk of a new cancer depends on the type of treatment, the age at treatment, the child’s sex, and also the presence of genetic conditions that increases a person’s chance of getting cancer. </p> <p>Not all secondary brain tumours are malignant. The most common type of secondary brain tumour is called a meningioma, which is benign. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Radiation therapy and chemotherapy can cause changes in normal cells which may increase the risk of malignant cells developing over time.</li> <li>In some cases, certain genetic conditions can be connected to brain tumours increasing the chance of a second tumour developing.</li> <li>Children will need regular check-ups and screenings for their entire lives to detect any problems early.</li> <li>A healthy lifestyle is important for preventing adult cancers.</li></ul>
Cancer secondaire après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesCCancer secondaire après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesSecondary cancer after a brain tumourFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000052.0000000000000458.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements importants sur l’occurrence de cancer secondaire chez votre enfant. Réponses dignes de confiance des hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Certains traitements comportent un faible risque qu’une nouvelle tumeur ou un nouveau cancer se développe. Ce risque est supérieur à celui de la population en général, mais il demeure très bas. Le risque de nouveau cancer dépend du type de traitement, de l’âge de l’enfant au moment du traitement, du sexe de l’enfant et de la présence de conditions génétiques qui font augmenter la possibilité qu’une personne développe un cancer. </p> <p>Les tumeurs cérébrales secondaires ne sont pas toutes malignes. Le type le plus fréquent de tumeur cérébrale secondaire est le méningiome, qui est bénin.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La radiothérapie et la chimiothérapie peuvent modifier des cellules normales ce qui peut augmenter les risques que des cellules malignes se développent avec le temps.</li> <li>Dans certains cas, certains troubles génétiques peuvent être associés à des tumeurs cérébrales, augmentant le risque qu’une seconde tumeur se développe.</li> <li>Les enfants auront besoin d’examens de suivi et de dépistage réguliers tout au long de leur vie afin de détecter les problèmes potentiels de manière précoce.</li> <li>Un mode de vie sain est important afin de prévenir les cancers à l’âge adulte.</li></ul>

 

 

Secondary cancer after a brain tumour1432.00000000000Secondary cancer after a brain tumourSecondary cancer after a brain tumourSEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000052.0000000000000458.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information concerning the occurance of secondary cancer in your child. Trusted Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Some treatments carry a small risk that a new tumour or cancer will develop. This risk is higher than the general population, but it is still quite low. The risk of a new cancer depends on the type of treatment, the age at treatment, the child’s sex, and also the presence of genetic conditions that increases a person’s chance of getting cancer. </p> <p>Not all secondary brain tumours are malignant. The most common type of secondary brain tumour is called a meningioma, which is benign. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Radiation therapy and chemotherapy can cause changes in normal cells which may increase the risk of malignant cells developing over time.</li> <li>In some cases, certain genetic conditions can be connected to brain tumours increasing the chance of a second tumour developing.</li> <li>Children will need regular check-ups and screenings for their entire lives to detect any problems early.</li> <li>A healthy lifestyle is important for preventing adult cancers.</li></ul><p>The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study estimated that children treated for brain tumours had a 2% chance of developing a second cancer after 20 years. This study followed more than 13,000 children with cancer, including 1,779 children who had malignant brain tumours who had survived at least five years.</p> <p>Among the children successfully treated for a brain tumour, 24 developed second cancers. These included gliomas, breast cancer, melanoma, bone cancer, and other cancers. Half of the new cases of cancer developed within 9 years of the first diagnosis. Half of them developed after nine years. </p> <h2>What causes this?</h2> <p>Several different factors can contribute to the risk of developing a new cancer.</p> <ul> <li> Radiation therapy can cause changes in normal cells. Over time, this may increase the risk of malignant cells developing. In general, a higher dose of radiation leads to a greater risk. The risk of developing another brain tumour after radiation is seven times higher than the risk of developing a brain tumour in the healthy population. </li> <li> Chemotherapy can cause changes in normal cells. Over time, this may increase the risk of malignant cells developing. In particular, alkylating agents were found to increase the risk. This category of drugs includes cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, lomustine (CCNU), carmustine (BCNU), nitrogen mustard, and thiopeta. In general, higher doses lead to a greater risk. Alkylating agents increase the risk of leukemia. </li> <li> It is possible that a new tumour would have developed anyway. Also, certain genetic conditions in families are connected to brain tumours. They may increase the chance of a second tumour developing. </li></ul> <h2>How will this be screened?</h2> <p>Children who have had brain tumours will need regular check-ups throughout their lives. Although the chance of developing a new tumour is very small, this can provide reassurance and help detect any problems early. </p> <h2>What can be done?</h2> <p>If a new tumour does develop, then a new treatment plan will need to be made. The plan will depend on the type of tumour.</p> <h2>How will this affect your child’s future?</h2> <p>Because of the small increase in cancer risk, it becomes very important to make healthy lifestyle choices to help prevent the cancers that are typically associated with adults. The general advice given to adults to prevent cancer is: </p> <ul> <li> Don't smoke.</li> <li> Exercise several times a week.</li> <li> Maintain a healthy body weight.</li> <li> Eat a healthy diet, including four to six fruits and vegetables a day. </li> <li> Learn how to do breast or testicular self-exams, and do them every month.</li> <li> Get regular check-ups.</li> <li> Drink alcohol in moderation.</li> <li> Avoid direct exposure to the sun and use sunscreen, particularly on irradiated skin.</li></ul>Secondary cancer after a brain tumour

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