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Asthma in schoolAAsthma in schoolAsthma in schoolEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-01-29T05:00:00ZSharon Dell, BEng, MD, FRCPCBonnie Fleming-Carroll, MN, ACNP, CAEJennifer Leaist, RN, BScNRishita Peterson, RN, BScN, MNGurjit Sangha, RN, MNJames Tjon, BScPhm, PharmD, RPh7.0000000000000074.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about what steps should be taken when a child with asthma goes to school. The teacher should be well informed about what to do during an asthma attack.<br></p><p> If your child has well-controlled asthma, they should be able to go to school or day care regularly. Your child should also participate in activities just like other children. But keep in mind that your child’s asthma can be triggered when they are at school. This page discusses what you can do to make sure your child’s asthma is taken care of at school.</p><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li> It is important to provide your child's school with your child's asthma action plan so the teacher can help in the case of an asthma attack. </li><li>You should decide with your child, your child's doctor and school if your child is ready to carry their own medicine.</li><li>Inform the school and your child's teachers about your child's asthma triggers.</li></ul>
Asthme à l’écoleAAsthme à l’écoleAsthma in schoolFrenchRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-01-29T05:00:00ZSharon Dell, BEng, MD, FRCPCBonnie Fleming-Carroll, MN, ACNP, CAEJennifer Leaist, RN, BScNRishita Peterson, RN, BScN, MNGurjit Sangha, RN, MNJames Tjon, BScPhm, PharmD, RPh7.0000000000000074.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur les mesures à prendre lorsqu’un enfant asthmatique va à l’école. L’enseignant doit savoir précisément ce qu’il est tenu de faire en cas de crise d’asthme. </p><p>Si son asthme est bien contrôlé, votre enfant devrait être en mesure d’aller régulièrement à l’école ou à la garderie. En outre, votre enfant devrait participer aux activités comme tous les autres enfants. Mais n’oubliez pas que l’<a href="/asthma">asthme</a> de votre enfant pourrait être déclenché tandis qu’il se trouve à l’école. Dans cette page Web, vous trouverez des informations sur ce que vous pouvez faire pour vous assurer que l’asthme de votre enfant est bien géré à l’école.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>Il est important que le plan d’action contre l’asthme de votre enfant soit fourni à son école afin que l’enseignant puisse l’aider en cas de crise. Vous devrez décider avec votre enfant, le médecin de votre enfant et l’école si votre enfant est prêt à porter son propre médicament. Informez l’école et les enseignants de votre enfant des éléments déclencheurs de ses crises d’asthme.</li></ul>

 

 

Asthma in school1489.00000000000Asthma in schoolAsthma in schoolAEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-01-29T05:00:00ZSharon Dell, BEng, MD, FRCPCBonnie Fleming-Carroll, MN, ACNP, CAEJennifer Leaist, RN, BScNRishita Peterson, RN, BScN, MNGurjit Sangha, RN, MNJames Tjon, BScPhm, PharmD, RPh7.0000000000000074.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about what steps should be taken when a child with asthma goes to school. The teacher should be well informed about what to do during an asthma attack.<br></p><p> If your child has well-controlled asthma, they should be able to go to school or day care regularly. Your child should also participate in activities just like other children. But keep in mind that your child’s asthma can be triggered when they are at school. This page discusses what you can do to make sure your child’s asthma is taken care of at school.</p><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li> It is important to provide your child's school with your child's asthma action plan so the teacher can help in the case of an asthma attack. </li><li>You should decide with your child, your child's doctor and school if your child is ready to carry their own medicine.</li><li>Inform the school and your child's teachers about your child's asthma triggers.</li></ul><p>If your child has well-controlled asthma, they should be able to go to school or day care regularly. Your child should also participate in activities just like other children. But keep in mind that your child’s <a href="/asthma">asthma</a> can be triggered when they are at school. This page discusses what you can do to make sure your child’s asthma is taken care of at school. </p><h2>Communication with your child’s teacher and school</h2><p>It is very important to tell your child’s teacher and the school about your child’s asthma.</p><ul><li>The school should have a copy of your child’s <a href="/Article?contentid=1487&language=English">asthma action plan</a> and a student asthma management form. </li><li>Your child’s teacher should know how to help your child with their reliever medicine if they have an asthma episode.</li></ul><p>Let the teacher know if there are any changes in your child’s health, medicine, or asthma action plan.</p><p>Your child may have a new teacher every year, so you should talk to the school at least once a year before your child’s school year starts. Be prepared to teach the new teacher about your child’s asthma needs. </p><h2>Asthma medicines in school</h2><p>The teacher should be able to work with your child’s asthma action plan to give your child asthma reliever medicine in case your child has an asthma episode. </p><p>Give the teachers your child’s asthma medicines. Explain how to use them properly. Make sure the instructions are included. Make sure each medicine is well labelled with: </p><ul><li>your child’s name</li><li>the name of the medicine</li><li>the number of doses needed</li><li>your doctor’s phone number</li></ul><p>Tell the teacher to store the medicines in a cool, dry place where other students cannot get them.</p><h3>When your child is ready to carry their own asthma medicine</h3><p>Older children may be able to carry their own medicines and take them if they need to. Your child should follow the school’s rules about this. Ask the school if there are forms that need to be filled out in order for your child to carry their own medicine. You may need to give the school a copy of your child’s prescription.</p><p>Give the school a set of your child’s medicines so there is always a backup available for your child.</p><p>You, your child, the doctor, and the school should decide together if your child is ready to carry their own medicine. These are some questions you should think about when making the decision: </p><ul><li>Is your child ready for the responsibility of carrying and taking their own medicine?</li><li>Can your child recognize the warning signs that they are going to have an asthma episode?</li><li>Does your child know when and how to use their medicine?</li><li>Can your child remember and follow the school’s rules about using medicine?</li><li>Do you want your child to carry and take their own medicine?</li><li>Do you know the school’s rules about using medicine?</li><li>Can you make sure your child always has their medicine with them, and that it is refilled when needed?</li><li>Can you, your child, and the school keep track of the times when your child needs to use their reliever medicine?</li><li>Is there a nurse at school all day, every day, who can help your child with their medicine if needed?</li><li>Is there a school policy about safely storing medicines and getting quick access to them when needed?</li><li>Are school staff, including teachers, coaches, and bus drivers, trained to handle asthma emergencies?</li></ul><h2>Recognizing asthma warning signs in school</h2><p>If your child uses a <a href="/Article?contentid=1486&language=English">peak flow meter</a>, show your child’s teachers how to use it and ask them to use it when your child feels unwell. Mark your child’s normal peak flow level on the flow meter and teach the teachers what the green, yellow, and red zones mean. </p><p>Give your child’s teachers a list of your child’s <a href="/Article?contentid=1483&language=English">asthma warning signs</a> so they understand when to give reliever medicine and when to call 911. </p><p>Make sure your child’s teachers know whom to contact in case of an emergency. Give them alternative contact numbers. Be sure to let these contact persons know what to do in an emergency situation. </p><h2>Avoiding asthma triggers in school</h2><p>Give your child’s teachers a list of your child’s asthma triggers and explain why it is important for your child to avoid them in school. Tell them about your child’s allergies as well, including food allergies if any. </p><p>It may be helpful to ask the teachers to let your child avoid dust or any chores that involve dusting. Ask the teachers to let your child sit away from the blackboard. Your child should not clean blackboard erasers. The dust from chalk can trigger asthma. </p><p>If your child is allergic to pets or moulds, your child should avoid pets and plants in the classroom. In day care centres, carpets and mats used for activities and napping may be full of dust. Have your child bring their own mat, or ask the teachers to separate your child from other children’s mats. </p><p>Ask your child’s principal to tell you ahead of time when the school will be doing renovations or painting. Strong odours from the paints, fumes, and construction dust can trigger asthma. You can ask for your child to stay home during the first few days of construction, when the odours and dust will be heaviest. Make sure your child’s asthma is well controlled and that they have his asthma medicines before they go back to school. </p><p>Monitor the weather conditions every day. During winter, make sure your child has enough clothes on to protect them from the cold. A scarf that can cover your child’s nose and mouth is very important if they are going outdoors during <a href="/Article?contentid=1485&language=English">recess</a>. On days when the air quality is bad or pollen levels are high, ask your child’s teacher to let your child stay indoors during recess. </p><h2>Asthma and missed school days</h2><p>If your child’s asthma is well controlled, your child should not miss school days because of it. But even with well-controlled asthma, your child may need to go for medical appointments more often than other children. This can mean that your child needs to miss some days of school. </p><p>Talk to your child’s teacher about how your child can make up missed work. Your child should not be penalized for missing school days because of asthma. </p><p>Ask your doctor about when your child can go to school and when your child should stay home because of asthma symptoms. Your doctor may give you some specific rules.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/asthma_at_school.jpgAsthma in school

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