AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)AArrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)EnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-10-26T04:00:00ZJennifer Russell, MD, FRCPC;Aamir Jeewa, MD, FAAP, FRCP(C)13.000000000000025.000000000000082.0000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, how it’s diagnosed and possible treatments of the condition.<br></p><figure class="swf-asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Arrhythmogenic right ventricular </span> <span class="asset-image-title">cardiomyopathy</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/swf.html?swffile=CM_arvc_MED_ANI_EN.swf" </div> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">With this condition, the muscle of the right ventricle is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue. Abnormal electrical signals may start within this fibrous tissue, resulting in abnormal heart rhythms. </figcaption> </figure> <p>"Arrhythmogenic" means causing an abnormal heart rhythm (<a href="/Article?contentid=890&language=English">arrhythmia</a>). With arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, the <a href="/Article?contentid=1577&language=English">muscle of the right ventricle</a> is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue. The electrical signal that keeps the heart beating regularly cannot pass through the abnormal fibrotic tissue, resulting in abnormal heart rhythms.</p><p>ARVC is a genetic disease associated with replacement of the heart muscle by fat and is associated with abnormal heart rhythm and sudden death. It occurs in 1 in every 5,000 people.</p><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li>Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) results in abnormal heart rhythms.</li><li>In ARVC, the muscle of the right ventricle is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue, which blocks the electrical signal that keeps the heart beating normally.</li><li>Exercise restriction is often recommended as treatment. For high risk cases, an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) may be required.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of ARVC</h2><p>If a child has ARVC, they may experience:</p><ul><li>palpitations</li><li>abnormal heart rhythm</li><li>fainting</li><li>sudden cardiac arrest</li><li>heart failure</li></ul><p>Children with ARVC need to see a special cardiologist called an electrophysiologist, who is a heart rhythm specialist. If the heart function is involved, they will need to see a heart function specialist as well. Some children are referred for assessment because of their symptoms, but more frequently diagnosis is made after another family member has been diagnosed with the disease.</p><h2>Diagnosis of ARVC</h2><p>There is no single test that can diagnosis ARVC. A diagnosis is confirmed through a combination of a physical exam, cardiac tests and a family medical history. </p><ul><li>Imaging of the heart, usually an MRI, to check for fatty deposits and fibrous tissue.</li><li>Heart catheterization test to obtain a sample of heart tissue. The tissue is biopsied to check for fatty deposits.</li><li>An electrocardiogram (ECG) to check for contraction, relaxation or rhythm abnormalities.</li><li>A family medical history and genetics test. Genetic abnormalities (mutations) are found in about half of all families. If a genetic abnormality causing ARVC is found in a child, it's a good idea for close family members (parents and siblings) to be tested as well. </li></ul><h2>Treatment of ARVC</h2><p>Treatment of ARVC often involves exercise restriction and occasionally, medicine. For high risk cases, placement of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) may be necessary to help control the heart’s rhythm.</p>
Cardiomyopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droitCCardiomyopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droitArrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC)FrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-15T05:00:00ZJennifer Russell, MD, FRCPC13.000000000000025.000000000000082.0000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>En cas de myocardiopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droit, une partie du muscle cardiaque est remplacé par un tissu gras et fibreux, ce qui peut causer une arythmie.</p><p>Le terme « arythmogénique » signifie « qui cause une arythmie ». En cas de myocardiopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droit, le muscle du ventricule droit est remplacé par un tissu gras et fibreux. Le signal électrique grâce auquel le cœur bat régulièrement ne peut pas traverser ce tissu fibreux anormal, ce qui entraîne un rythme cardiaque irrégulier. La myocardiopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droit peut être héréditaire.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> La cardiomyopathie arythmogénique du ventricule droit crée un rythme cardiaque anormal. </li> <li> Pour traiter cette maladie, on recourt souvent à des médicaments et/ou à un défibrillateur cardiaque implantable (DCI). </li></ul>

 

 

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)1631.00000000000Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)AEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-10-26T04:00:00ZJennifer Russell, MD, FRCPC;Aamir Jeewa, MD, FAAP, FRCP(C)13.000000000000025.000000000000082.0000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, how it’s diagnosed and possible treatments of the condition.<br></p><figure class="swf-asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Arrhythmogenic right ventricular </span> <span class="asset-image-title">cardiomyopathy</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/swf.html?swffile=CM_arvc_MED_ANI_EN.swf" </div> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">With this condition, the muscle of the right ventricle is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue. Abnormal electrical signals may start within this fibrous tissue, resulting in abnormal heart rhythms. </figcaption> </figure> <p>"Arrhythmogenic" means causing an abnormal heart rhythm (<a href="/Article?contentid=890&language=English">arrhythmia</a>). With arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, the <a href="/Article?contentid=1577&language=English">muscle of the right ventricle</a> is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue. The electrical signal that keeps the heart beating regularly cannot pass through the abnormal fibrotic tissue, resulting in abnormal heart rhythms.</p><p>ARVC is a genetic disease associated with replacement of the heart muscle by fat and is associated with abnormal heart rhythm and sudden death. It occurs in 1 in every 5,000 people.</p><h2>What is cardiomyopathy</h2><p>Cardiomyopathy is a disorder affecting the heart muscle. The heart may have a normal structure but there are problems in the way it develops or functions. Cardiomyopathy usually results in the heart being unable to pump effectively, also known as <a href="/Article?contentid=1586&language=English">heart failure</a>. </p><p>Cardiomyopathy can be caused by a number of factors, including infections, conditions affecting the body’s metabolism and genetics.<br></p><p>There are several different types of cardiomyopathy. The main four types are: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1629&language=English">hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1628&language=English">dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1630&language=English">restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)</a></li><li>arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC).<br><br></li></ul><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li>Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) results in abnormal heart rhythms.</li><li>In ARVC, the muscle of the right ventricle is replaced by fat and fibrous tissue, which blocks the electrical signal that keeps the heart beating normally.</li><li>Exercise restriction is often recommended as treatment. For high risk cases, an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) may be required.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of ARVC</h2><p>If a child has ARVC, they may experience:</p><ul><li>palpitations</li><li>abnormal heart rhythm</li><li>fainting</li><li>sudden cardiac arrest</li><li>heart failure</li></ul><p>Children with ARVC need to see a special cardiologist called an electrophysiologist, who is a heart rhythm specialist. If the heart function is involved, they will need to see a heart function specialist as well. Some children are referred for assessment because of their symptoms, but more frequently diagnosis is made after another family member has been diagnosed with the disease.</p><h2>Diagnosis of ARVC</h2><p>There is no single test that can diagnosis ARVC. A diagnosis is confirmed through a combination of a physical exam, cardiac tests and a family medical history. </p><ul><li>Imaging of the heart, usually an MRI, to check for fatty deposits and fibrous tissue.</li><li>Heart catheterization test to obtain a sample of heart tissue. The tissue is biopsied to check for fatty deposits.</li><li>An electrocardiogram (ECG) to check for contraction, relaxation or rhythm abnormalities.</li><li>A family medical history and genetics test. Genetic abnormalities (mutations) are found in about half of all families. If a genetic abnormality causing ARVC is found in a child, it's a good idea for close family members (parents and siblings) to be tested as well. </li></ul><h2>Treatment of ARVC</h2><p>Treatment of ARVC often involves exercise restriction and occasionally, medicine. For high risk cases, placement of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) may be necessary to help control the heart’s rhythm.</p>Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)False

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.