Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)EEchocardiogram (heart ultrasound)Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)EnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2009-12-11T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001252.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about echocardiograms, special tests that take pictures of the heart. Learn about how they are done, and how to help a child prepare for one.</p><p>An echocardiogram uses sound waves to take a picture of your child's heart. Specialized types of echocardiogram include a fetal echocardiogram, a transesophageal echocardiogram, a dobutamine stress echocardiogram, and a bubble study.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Your child's arms or chest will have three stickers (electrodoes), which are wired to the echo machine and record their heartbeat during the test.</li> <li>The sonographer puts some jelly on your child’s chest and belly, moves the probe around and take pictures of your child's heart.</li> <li>An echocardiogram takes from 30 minutes to 90 minutes or more. </li> <li>Your child’s cardiologist, paediatrician, or other specialist who ordered the test are the only people who can give you the results of your child’s echocardiogram.</li></ul>
ÉchocardiogrammeÉÉchocardiogrammeEchocardiogram (Heart Ultrasound)FrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2009-12-11T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001252.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Familiarisez-vous avec les échocardiogrammes, des tests spéciaux qui prennent des photos du cœur. Familiarisez-vous avec le fonctionnement de ces tests ainsi qu’avec la manière d’aider un enfant à s’y préparer.</p><p>Un échocardiogramme utilise des ondes sonores pour prendre une photo du cœur de votre enfant. Les types d’échocardiogrammes spécialisés comprennent l’échocardiographie fœtale, l’échocardiographie transœsophagienne, l’échocardiographie de stress sous dobutamine ainsi qu’une étude par injection de bulles.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> On va placer trois autocollants (électrodes) sur les bras ou la poitrine de votre enfant, lesquels seront raccordés à la machine échocardiographique et enregistreront sa fréquence cardiaque pendant le test.</li> <li>L’échographiste applique du gel sur la poitrine et sur le ventre de votre enfant, il déplace la sonde et prend des photos du cœur de votre enfant.</li> <li> Un échocardiogramme prend entre 30 et 90 minutes, voire plus. </li> <li> Le cardiologue de votre enfant, son pédiatre, de même que tout autre spécialiste s’occupant de lui sont les seules personnes à pouvoir vous donner les résultats de son échocardiogramme. </li></ul>

 

 

Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)1642.00000000000Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)EEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2009-12-11T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001252.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about echocardiograms, special tests that take pictures of the heart. Learn about how they are done, and how to help a child prepare for one.</p><p>An echocardiogram uses sound waves to take a picture of your child's heart. Specialized types of echocardiogram include a fetal echocardiogram, a transesophageal echocardiogram, a dobutamine stress echocardiogram, and a bubble study.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Your child's arms or chest will have three stickers (electrodoes), which are wired to the echo machine and record their heartbeat during the test.</li> <li>The sonographer puts some jelly on your child’s chest and belly, moves the probe around and take pictures of your child's heart.</li> <li>An echocardiogram takes from 30 minutes to 90 minutes or more. </li> <li>Your child’s cardiologist, paediatrician, or other specialist who ordered the test are the only people who can give you the results of your child’s echocardiogram.</li></ul><h2>Echocardiogram</h2><h3>What is an echocardiogram?</h3> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Echocardiogram</span><img alt="Echocardiogram" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HC_Echocardiogram_Img_MEDIMG-PHO_EN.jpg" /> </figure> <p>An echocardiogram is a test that uses sound waves to take a picture of your child’s heart. An echocardiogram is also called an echo. This test does not hurt and is completely safe. You should be able to stay with your child during the test. </p><h3>Getting ready for an echocardiogram</h3><p>Most children do not need any special preparation for an echocardiogram. However, if your child is under 3 years old or cannot lie still, they will need a sedative or general anaesthesia. These are special medicines that will help your child sleep for the test. An echocardiogram works best when the child does not move. </p><p>If your child does not need a sedative or general anaesthesia, they can eat and drink normally before and after the echo. If your child has a favourite toy, a security blanket, or a favourite videotape, please bring that along. </p><p>If your child is having a sedative or general anaesthesia for the test, they will need to stop eating and drinking several hours before the test.</p><h3>What will happen during the echocardiogram</h3> <p>The person who will perform the test is specially trained to do echocardiograms. This person is called a sonographer.</p><p>The sonographer will first measure your child’s weight and height. They will bring you and your child to a special echo room.</p><p>Your child will lie on a special bed that can move up and down. Your child should take off his or her sweater, shirt, and other clothes above the waist. </p><p>The sonographer will put three stickers on your child’s chest or arms. These stickers are called electrodes. They are connected by wires to the echo machine. They record your child’s heartbeat during the test. </p><p>Next, the sonographer will put some jelly on your child’s chest and belly so that the probe can move easily over your child’s skin. The probe is like a camera that takes pictures of your child’s heart. It is about 15 centimetres (6 inches) long and has a rounded end that sits lightly on the jelly. </p><p>Most of the lights will be turned off so the sonographer can see the pictures on the computer screen. The sonographer will move the probe around to take pictures of your child’s heart from different angles. Pictures are taken from the stomach, over the chest, and from the neck. You can watch these pictures on the computer screen. All of the pictures are saved on the computer. </p><p>Your child will feel no pain during the echocardiogram. They may feel some pressure from the probe. At times, your child may hear a loud swooshing noise when the echo machine records the flow of the blood through the heart. </p><p>After the sonographer completes the pictures, they will make a report and show the images to one of the cardiologists, a heart specialist, who is reviewing echo studies that day. The cardiologist may choose to take more pictures at this time. This is a normal part of the test. During this time, your child will remain connected to the echo machine. The sonographer or nurse will let you know when your child can get dressed again. </p><p>An echocardiogram takes from 30 minutes to 90 minutes or more. Often the first echocardiogram that your child has will take a longer amount of time. The length of time of the test will also depend on why your child’s doctor asked for the test. </p><h3>Helping your child prepare for the echocardiogram</h3><p>Be honest and open with your child about what to expect. Explain what will happen during the echocardiogram. Use as much detail as you think is appropriate for your child's level of understanding. Tell them about the appointment in advance so they are not surprised to show up at the hospital. Tell your child the test does not hurt and that there is no reason to be afraid of the test. Let your child know that you will be with them during the test. </p><h3>Getting the results of the echocardiogram</h3><p>Your child’s cardiologist, paediatrician, or other specialist who ordered the test are the only people who can give you the results of your child’s echocardiogram. </p><p>The sonographer doing the test, or the cardiologist reviewing the pictures is not allowed to give you the results. This is important because they may not be aware of all of you and your child’s health concerns.</p><h2>Other kinds of echocardiograms</h2><h3>What is a fetal echocardiogram?</h3><p>When an echocardiogram is done when the baby is still in the mother’s womb, it is called a fetal echocardiogram. This echo can detect malformations as early as 16 weeks into the pregnancy, when the parts of the baby’s heart become clearly visible. It is usually done if there is a family history of congenital heart disease, if chromosomal or other abnormalities are suspected, if the heartbeat is irregular, or if the mother has medical problems that might affect the development of the heart.</p><p>To have this test, the mother will have her stomach covered in a jelly to help transmit the sound waves and get good quality pictures. For this test, it is usually not necessary to drink water before the appointment.</p><h3>What is a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)?</h3><p>A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is an echocardiogram carried out by putting a special probe down the throat. The probe is a thin flexible tube with a miniature camera on the end. The child is given a general anaesthetic during the procedure. </p><p>A transesophageal echo takes clearer pictures than a regular echo since it can get closer to the heart. A TEE is done if the pictures from the normal echo are not good enough, at the end of surgery, in the operating room, and sometimes during heart catheterization.</p><h3>What is a dobutamine stress echocardiogram?</h3><p>The dobutamine stress echo combines 2 tests: the regular echocardiogram and a drug-stimulated stress test. The child is given a drug called dobutamine through an IV. Dobutamine is a drug that makes the heart beat faster and stronger and increases blood pressure. It has an effect very similar to exercise.</p><p>This test is done in children to study how the walls of the heart move and how the blood flows in the coronary arteries when the heart is working hard. It enables doctors to see how the heart functions at its peak heart rate. This test is often done to explore the effect of exercise on the heart, and how fast the heart recovers from exercise. The dobutamine does not stay long in the body and has no lasting effects. Children may feel anxious during the test because they may feel hot and the heart beats fast, similar to when they are exercising.</p><h3>What is a bubble study?</h3><p>Sometimes a fluid called contrast medium is injected into your child’s bloodstream during the echocardiogram. This helps give a better picture of your child’s heart on the echocardiogram. </p><p>One type of contrast medium is saline (sterile salt water) mixed with a gas. Usually, the gas is carbon dioxide, the same gas that makes soda fizzy. When this solution is used it is called a bubble study. </p><p>A bubble study lets the cardiologist follow the path that the bubbles take through the bloodstream. This helps to find heart or lung problems. </p><p>The bubble study is safe. The bubble solution is easily absorbed into your child’s bloodstream.</p>Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)False

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