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Neonatology and neonatal intensive careNNeonatology and neonatal intensive careNeonatology and neonatal intensive careEnglishNeonatologyPrematureNANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000031.0000000000000591.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about neonatology, the study and care of newborns. Neonatology has lead to a high survival rate of newborns admitted into NICU care.</p><p>With the introduction of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the 1960's and early 1970's, survival rates for premature babies and full term babies born with medical problems began to climb. In Canada, over 95% of all babies admitted to a NICU now survive. Survival statistics are similar for most of the developed world. This incredible improvement in survival is due to increased understanding of newborn baby physiology, better management, and application of newer technologies. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In Canada, more than 95% of all babies admitted to a NICU survive.</li> <li>Some premature babies will have developmental problems, which can affect body movement and coordination, hearing, understanding, behaviour, learning, socialization and emotions.</li></ul>
Néonatologie et soins néonatals intensifsNNéonatologie et soins néonatals intensifsNeonatology and neonatal intensive careFrenchNeonatologyPrematureNANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000031.0000000000000591.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous au sujet de la néonatologie, soit l’étude et les soins des nouveaux-nés. La néonatologie a favorisé un taux de survie élevé des nouveaux-nés admis à l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs.</p><p>Avec l’introduction, dans les années 1960 et au début des années 1970, des unités néonatales des soins intensifs, le taux de survie des bébés prématurés et des bébés nés à terme souffrant de problèmes médicaux s’est mis à grimper. Au Canada, aujourd’hui, plus de 95 % de tous les bébés admis à l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs survivent. Les statistiques concernant la survie sont semblables dans la plupart des pays développés. On doit cette incroyable amélioration du taux de survie à une meilleure compréhension de la physiologie des nouveaux-nés, à une meilleure gestion et à l’application de nouvelles technologies. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Au Canada, plus de 95 % des bébés admis dans une unité néonatale de soins intensifs (UNSI) survivent.</li> <li>Certains bébés prématurés présenteront des problèmes de développement qui peuvent affecter le mouvement et la coordination de leur corps, leur ouïe, leur compréhension, leur comportement, leur capacité d’apprentissage, leur socialisation et leurs émotions.</li></ul>

 

 

Neonatology and neonatal intensive care1757.00000000000Neonatology and neonatal intensive careNeonatology and neonatal intensive careNEnglishNeonatologyPrematureNANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000031.0000000000000591.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about neonatology, the study and care of newborns. Neonatology has lead to a high survival rate of newborns admitted into NICU care.</p><p>With the introduction of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the 1960's and early 1970's, survival rates for premature babies and full term babies born with medical problems began to climb. In Canada, over 95% of all babies admitted to a NICU now survive. Survival statistics are similar for most of the developed world. This incredible improvement in survival is due to increased understanding of newborn baby physiology, better management, and application of newer technologies. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In Canada, more than 95% of all babies admitted to a NICU survive.</li> <li>Some premature babies will have developmental problems, which can affect body movement and coordination, hearing, understanding, behaviour, learning, socialization and emotions.</li></ul><h2>Survival and disability</h2><p>While the vast majority of deaths due to prematurity are now prevented, the survival rate for extremely premature babies, those born at a gestational age of 25 weeks or less, remains at about 50%. In addition, of those extremely premature babies that do survive, about half will have a disability of some kind, many of them severe. </p><p>Despite the incredible technological capabilities of the NICU, it must be recognized that there are limits to what can be accomplished. In the case of extremely premature babies, babies born with a very low birth weight, and babies born with certain medical problems, many cannot be saved. Of those who can be saved, some will have developmental problems that will have an important, and perhaps serious, impact upon their quality of life.</p><h2>Developmental problems</h2><p>Developmental problems originate in the brain and can affect the body and the mind. The severity of developmental problems ranges from mild, perhaps hardly noticeable, to severe, to the point that the child will require constant hands-on support and may not be aware of their surroundings. In many cases, with early intervention and therapy, the impact of developmental problems can be modified and diminished. Developmental problems can affect many functions, including body movement and coordination, hearing, understanding, behaviour, learning, socialization, and emotions. As with most conditions arising as a result of prematurity, the babies born most prematurely or with the lowest birth weights are most at risk for developmental problems. </p><h2>Limits of neonatal intensive care</h2><p>In many ways, the NICU represents an attempt to simulate, at least in part, the conditions in the womb in an effort to allow a baby time and the right environment to develop to maturity. But the NICU is only an approximation of the environment of the uterus. </p><p>Although neonatal research, technology, and knowledge continue to improve the survival and quality of life of premature babies, no amount of research can guarantee that all premature babies, especially those born at the extreme end of prematurity, will survive or be free of disability. At the same time, the vast majority of babies born at 28 weeks or more will go on to thrive as children. </p><p>Premature babies are fragile and every effort must be made to keep them from injury. Procedures and diagnostic tests, which often have small risks in and of themselves, are performed only out of necessity. For example, mechanical ventilation, while perhaps a life saving measure, can injure the lungs. Therefore, a baby will only be intubated and put on a ventilator when they absolutely need the help breathing. Other procedures have other risks, though they are generally small. </p><p>Any risks involved with individual procedures are explained, along with a description of the procedure itself, in the pages of this site. </p><h3>Confronting poor prospects</h3><p>Parents with a premature baby facing very poor prospects are often confronted with difficult choices. Many people feel that a certain level of quality of life is more important than simply sustaining life itself. Parents and the health care professionals at the NICU are, at times, forced to make decisions in the face of very poor prospects for a baby. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/neonatology_neonatal_intensive_care.jpgNeonatology and neonatal intensive care

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