Ethics of InterventionEEthics of InterventionEthics of InterventionEnglishNeonatologyPrematureNANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000040.0000000000000313.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about instances in which premature babies cannot be saved despite intervention. In these difficult situations, hope and reason need to be balanced.</p><p>In some instances, a premature baby cannot be saved despite intervention. In these difficult situations, hope and reason need to be balanced to decide what is best for the baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In some instances, premature babies cannot be saved despite medical advances in technological interventions. In these situations, parents and health-care professionals will need to find a balance between hope and reason.</li></ul>
Éthique de l’interventionÉÉthique de l’interventionEthics of InterventionFrenchNeonatologyPrematureNANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000040.0000000000000313.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur les cas où les bébés prématurés ne peuvent pas être sauvés malgré les interventions. Dans ces moments difficiles, on doit trouver un équilibre entre l’espoir et la raison.</p><p>Dans certains cas, les bébés prématurés ne peuvent être sauvés, malgré les interventions. Dans ces situations, les parents et le personnel de l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs doivent se battre afin de trouver un équilibre entre l’espoir et le réalisme.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Dans certains cas, les bébés prématurés ne peuvent être sauvés, malgré les avancées médicales dans les technologies d’intervention. Dans ces situations, les parents et les professionnels en soins de santé devront trouver un équilibre entre l’espoir et la raison.</li></ul>

 

 

Ethics of Intervention1784.00000000000Ethics of InterventionEthics of InterventionEEnglishNeonatologyPrematureNANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC12.000000000000040.0000000000000313.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about instances in which premature babies cannot be saved despite intervention. In these difficult situations, hope and reason need to be balanced.</p><p>In some instances, a premature baby cannot be saved despite intervention. In these difficult situations, hope and reason need to be balanced to decide what is best for the baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In some instances, premature babies cannot be saved despite medical advances in technological interventions. In these situations, parents and health-care professionals will need to find a balance between hope and reason.</li></ul><p>As technological interventions for prematurity have improved, treatment options have increased. In the past, there was very little to do for a premature baby, and, as a result, many premature babies did not survive. In the 1940s and 1950's, a baby with severe respiratory problems fared poorly. There was little that could be done to intervene and improve breathing. Now, the number of techniques to improve breathing is much greater, and outcomes have improved dramatically. </p> <p>Because such technological interventions are largely responsible for improved survival, there is often a temptation to try each technological intervention no matter what. It is difficult for parents and physicians alike to watch a premature baby in distress and not think they must “do something". However, some premature babies, most commonly those who are extremely premature, will not be saved despite aggressive intervention. Others may survive, but with devastating disabilities and the prospect of a severely impaired quality of life. Even when people understand that a baby’s outcome is overwhelmingly likely to be very poor, the temptation to continue technological intervention can be very strong. </p> <p>In these situations, parents and the staff of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) must struggle to find a balance between hope and realism. Every parent wants their baby to survive and grow to be a thriving child. The realization that this is unlikely to happen is hard to come to terms with. At times, it means accepting that “not doing something” can be a better option than continuing interventions that are unlikely to have any positive effect and may cause prolonged suffering for the baby and family. Faced with these dilemmas, many parents and physicians feel that that a certain level of quality of life is more important than simply life itself. This may be especially true when that life can only be made to continue through constant interventions and discomfort or suffering for the baby and family. </p> <p>These life-and-death issues are complex and involve other emotional and ethical considerations. Parents, together with the medical team, may have to make difficult decisions and may have to accept that discontinuing aggressive life-sustaining measures and providing comfort or end-of-life care may be the best option for their premature baby. </p> <h4>More information</h4> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1833&language=English">Decision Making </a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1855&language=English">Palliative Care </a></li></ul>Ethics of Intervention

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