Diagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesDDiagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesDiagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesEnglishNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000049.0000000000000600.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature infants. Often, the first sign of a PDA comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood flow. </p><p>The first sign of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) often comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood flow. Additional diagnostic testing such as blood gases measurement and X-rays will help to diagnose PDA.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The first sign of a PDA comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood throw, through a stethoscope.</li> <li>Other signs of PDA include apnea, jerky heart beat pulses in the leg or wrist, prominent pulses, and visible increased activity of the heart as seen on the chest wall.</li> <li>Diagnositic tests include blood gases measurement, X-rays and two-dimensional echocardiography.</li></ul>
Diagnostic de la persistance du canal artériel (PCA) chez les bébés prématurésDDiagnostic de la persistance du canal artériel (PCA) chez les bébés prématurésDiagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesFrenchNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000049.0000000000000600.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez au sujet de la persistance du canal artériel (PCA) chez les bébés prématurés. Les premiers signes d’une PCA proviennent du son émis par le cœur du bébé et par le flux sanguin.</p><p>Les premiers signes d’une PCA proviennent du son émis par le cœur du bébé et par le flux sanguin. Additional diagnostic testing such as blood gases measurement and X-rays will help to diagnose PDA.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le premier symptôme d’une persistance du canal artériel provient du son émis par le cœur du bébé et par le flot sanguin, qu’on écoute grâce à un stéthoscope ordinaire.</li> <li>D’autres symptômes d’une persistance du canal artériel comprennent l’apnée, des pulsations cardiaques irrégulières qui peuvent être perceptibles au niveau des jambes ou du poignet, un pouls fort ainsi qu’une activité accrue du cœur qui est visible sur la paroi du thorax.</li> <li>On compte parmi les tests de diagnostic les taux de gaz sanguins, les radiographies et l’échographie bidimensionnelle (échographie 2D). </li></ul>

 

 

Diagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babies1802.00000000000Diagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesDiagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babiesDEnglishNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000049.0000000000000600.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature infants. Often, the first sign of a PDA comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood flow. </p><p>The first sign of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) often comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood flow. Additional diagnostic testing such as blood gases measurement and X-rays will help to diagnose PDA.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The first sign of a PDA comes from the sound of the baby's heart and blood throw, through a stethoscope.</li> <li>Other signs of PDA include apnea, jerky heart beat pulses in the leg or wrist, prominent pulses, and visible increased activity of the heart as seen on the chest wall.</li> <li>Diagnositic tests include blood gases measurement, X-rays and two-dimensional echocardiography.</li></ul><p>In the womb, oxygen comes from the mother. As there is no need for blood to pass through the lungs of the fetus, the blood is diverted away from the lungs, to the rest of the body, by an artery called the ductus arteriosus.</p><p>Once a baby is born, their first breath initiates changes in the function of the heart. Suddenly filling with air, the lungs expand, the blood vessels within the lungs relax, and blood flow increases, allowing for gas exchange. As blood flow to the umbilical cord and placenta drops to nothing, the ductus arteriosus begins to close rapidly. Under normal circumstances, the ductus arteriosus is completely sealed and replaced with scar tissue in a few weeks, never to open again.</p><p>With some premature babies, this process of closure either does not happen at all or does not happen sufficiently, leaving a small opening. As a result, normal blood flow is affected. This condition is called patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). “Patent,” in this context, means “open.”</p><h2>How PDA is diagnosed</h2><p>Often, the first sign of a PDA comes from the sound of the baby’s heart and blood flow heard through an ordinary stethoscope. Typically, a PDA will sound like a continuous murmur, though depending on how and how much the ductus arteriosus has closed, the murmur may be short or long and regular. The audible murmurs are actually the sounds of blood flow turbulence. At times, however, a PDA can be silent; if the opening is large enough, there may not be any turbulence to cause a detectable murmur.</p><p>Other signs of PDA include apnea, jerky heart beat pulses that can appear in the leg or wrist, prominent pulses, and visible increased activity of the heart as seen on the chest wall.</p><p>A PDA diverts blood that has received oxygen already back into the lungs. This means that there is not enough oxygenated blood in the vascular system. It also means that there will be a corresponding increase in carbon dioxide levels in the blood. This increase will be detected because a baby’s blood gases are continuously monitored in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) with pulse oximetry.</p><p>As the heart must work abnormally hard to oxygenate the body, it tries to compensate by pumping harder, which may lead to an increase in its size. X-rays will often reveal an enlarged heart.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Patent Ductus Arteriosus X-ray</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Patent_ductus_arteriosus_XRAY_MEDIMG_PHO_EN.png" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In patent ductus arteriosus, the heart works hard to try and increase the volume of oxygenated blood moving through in the system, and the chambers of the heart may become enlarged.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The abnormal blood flow may also have other effects which can be detected with X-rays and other diagnostic imaging equipment. For example, a wide open PDA may actually increase pulmonary blood flow, creating an elevated blood pressure in the lungs and a corresponding weakness in the left ventricle of the heart. In more severe cases, this abnormal blood flow will cause pulmonary edema, or build-up of fluid in the lungs, making breathing more difficult. Under most circumstances, these effects can be observed on an X-ray.</p><p>Two-dimensional echocardiography (2D echo), an imaging technique similar to an ultrasound, can provide more detailed information about the PDA, including its size and the amount of blood flowing through it and how well it has responded to therapy.</p><h4>More information</h4><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1617&language=English">Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babies</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1839&language=English">Treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babies</a> <br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Patent_ductus_arteriosus_XRAY_MEDIMG_PHO_EN.pngDiagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature babies

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.