Breastfeeding premature babies in the NICUBBreastfeeding premature babies in the NICUBreastfeeding premature babies in the NICUEnglishNeonatology;NutritionPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)Nose;Mouth;StomachDigestive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChris Tomlinson, MBChB, BScDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLC12.000000000000039.0000000000000800.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about breast milk, the preferred source of nutrition for most babies, whether they are in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or at home.</p><p>Breast milk is the ideal food for babies. It offers protection that other foods and nourishment cannot provide. Although some babies may be born early and are too small to feed directly from the breast, breast milk is still very important. Premature babies are fed breast milk when they are ready even if it does not yet come directly from the breast. Until premature babies are ready to feed from the breast, mothers can pump or express milk about every three hours to establish a good milk supply.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Until about 34 weeks gestational age, premature babies will be fed using either an NG tube or intravenously through total parenteral nutrition (TPN).</li> <li>Mother's of premature babies should still establish their milk supply even if their baby is not yet ready to breastfeed.</li> <li>A lactation consultant can help you and your baby transition from tube, intravenous or bottle feeding, to breastfeeding.</li></ul>
Allaitement maternel des bébés prématurés à l’UNSIAAllaitement maternel des bébés prématurés à l’UNSIBreastfeeding premature babies in the NICUFrenchNeonatology;NutritionPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)Nose;Mouth;StomachDigestive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChris Tomlinson, MBChB, BScDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLC12.000000000000039.0000000000000800.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous au sujet du lait maternel, la source de nutrition préférée de la majorité des bébés, qu’ils soient à l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs (UNSI) ou à la maison.</p><p>Le lait maternel est l’aliment idéal pour les bébés. Il offre une protection que les autres aliments ne peuvent offrir. Quoique certains bébés peuvent être nés tôt et trop petits pour se nourrir directement au sein, le lait maternel est encore très important. On nourrit les bébés prématurés au lait maternel lorsqu’ils sont prêts même si le lait ne vient pas directement du sein. Jusqu’à ce que les bébés prématurés soient prêts à se nourrir au sein, les mères peuvent extraire le lait à chaque trois heures environ afin d’en faire une bonne réserve.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Avant l’âge d’environ 34 semaine de gestation, les bébés prématurés seront nourris soit à l’aide d’une sonde naso-gastrique ou par la voie intraveineuse à l’aide d’une alimentation parentérale totale.</li> <li>Même si le bébé n’est pas tout à fait prêt pour l’allaitement maternel, les mères devraient préparer une réserve de lait.</li> <li>Une consultante en allaitement peut vous aider ainsi que votre bébé dans la transition entre le tube, l’alimentation intraveineuse ou le biberon et l’allaitement maternel.</li></ul>

 

 

Breastfeeding premature babies in the NICU1843.00000000000Breastfeeding premature babies in the NICUBreastfeeding premature babies in the NICUBEnglishNeonatology;NutritionPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)Nose;Mouth;StomachDigestive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChris Tomlinson, MBChB, BScDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLC12.000000000000039.0000000000000800.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about breast milk, the preferred source of nutrition for most babies, whether they are in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or at home.</p><p>Breast milk is the ideal food for babies. It offers protection that other foods and nourishment cannot provide. Although some babies may be born early and are too small to feed directly from the breast, breast milk is still very important. Premature babies are fed breast milk when they are ready even if it does not yet come directly from the breast. Until premature babies are ready to feed from the breast, mothers can pump or express milk about every three hours to establish a good milk supply.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Until about 34 weeks gestational age, premature babies will be fed using either an NG tube or intravenously through total parenteral nutrition (TPN).</li> <li>Mother's of premature babies should still establish their milk supply even if their baby is not yet ready to breastfeed.</li> <li>A lactation consultant can help you and your baby transition from tube, intravenous or bottle feeding, to breastfeeding.</li></ul><h2>Not yet ready to suck</h2><p>Until about 34 weeks gestation, babies have not yet developed the skill to coordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing. At that age, the brain is not mature enough. Before 34 weeks, premature babies will have to be fed either with a feeding tube inserted through the nose or mouth that leads to the stomach, or intravenously with total parenteral nutrition (TPN).</p><p>Premature babies may not be able to have breast milk (or formula milk) right away due to gastrointestinal (GI) or other complications. For example, a baby with a bowel complication such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) will have to wait until the bowel is healthy before being able to digest breast milk. Babies with respiratory complications will also have to wait to breastfeed and will be fed intravenously first. </p><h2>Pumping to establish a milk supply</h2><p>Even if your baby is not yet ready to either breastfeed or consume breast milk, it is best to establish a milk supply as soon as possible after your baby’s birth. Establishing a milk supply means pumping your breasts.</p><p>There are some challenges that mothers of premature babies face when trying to establish a milk supply for their baby. Probably the biggest challenge is the simple fact of physical separation. It may be necessary to transport the baby to a different hospital, or the mother and baby may be on different units within a hospital. It may take some time before the mother and baby are re-united following birth. </p><p>Although the sooner you stimulate your body to produce milk, the easier it is to maintain a good milk supply for your baby, milk supply can still be established if you are unable to start pumping right away. The best way to pump is with an efficient hospital grade double electric breast pump.</p><p>You will likely pump milk both at home and at the hospital. The staff at the NICU unit will give you instructions on the care and handling and storage of your breast milk. After the first few weeks of the premature baby’s hospitalization, some mothers find that their milk supply is decreasing. Most NICU’s will have a lactation consultant or breastfeeding specialist to help women develop a strategy to increase their volumes again. Many women overcome these and other breastfeeding challenges when their baby becomes healthy enough to suckle at the breast.</p><h2>Transitioning to the breast</h2><p>Once your premature baby is well enough to be held skin-to-skin (Kangaroo Care), your breasts will be more stimulated to produce milk. If your baby has had soothers or been bottle fed, it will take a bit of time before the baby can learn the new method of feeding at the breast. During early attempts at breastfeeding your baby may reject your nipple because it is a new sensation in their mouth. Try not to become frustrated with these first attempts. Both you and your baby are learning a new skill.</p><p>Here are the common transition steps from tube feeding to breastfeeding. </p><ol><li>Kangaroo Care (skin-to-skin) </li><li>Place mouth close to the nipple. </li><li>Express some milk onto your nipple and rub it along your baby’s lips. </li><li>Your baby must become familiar with the smell and taste of breast milk before becoming a willing participant. </li><li>Soon your baby will be rooting and seeking your breast, even while they receive your milk by the feeding tube. </li><li>When your baby is awake and alert, seek assistance to position and latch correctly.</li><li>The baby holds on to the nipple and begins a suck/swallow pattern. </li><li>Now that your baby has shown the ability to feed at the breast, it is time to weight your baby before and after feeding to determine how much breast milk they drank and reduce their tube feeding by that amount. </li><li>The baby should now be fed partially on demand or on their feeding readiness cues. </li><li>Mom and baby should room-in to establish breastfeeding day and night. </li></ol><h2>Getting help</h2><p>If your premature baby has been bottle fed and/or you have a decreased milk supply, your baby may not be happy with the shape of your nipple or the flow of your milk in comparison. A lactation consultant or breastfeeding specialist can show you how to use a nipple shield to mimic a bottle nipple on your breast. By pumping your breast until your milk begins to flow, your breast will provide the ‘instant’ flow of milk that your baby has learned by bottle feeding. </p><p>Only the tiniest fraction of women, even when properly assisted are unable to produce enough breast milk to fully feed their babies. Remember, any amount of breast milk is better than no breast milk at all.</p>Breastfeeding premature babies in the NICU

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