Possible problems with lines and cathetersPPossible problems with lines and cathetersPossible problems with lines and cathetersEnglishNeonatology;OtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BodyNAProceduresPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Elliott, RN10.000000000000052.0000000000000644.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about possible problems with lines and catheters. The size of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby.</p><p>The size or number of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby. If the veins are too small or difficult to access, a central line may be required even for a baby who is not expected to need treatment beyond a few days. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The size of a vein or the number of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby.</li> <li>Possible problems that can occur with lines and catheters include placement, bleeding, phlebitis, infection, blockage, interstitial catheter, peripheral intravenous line burn, catheter clot, pleural effusion, cardiac tamponade, and arterial spasm.</li></ul>
Problèmes possibles avec les tubulures et les cathétersPProblèmes possibles avec les tubulures et les cathétersPossible problems with lines and cathetersFrenchNeonatology;OtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BodyNAProceduresPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Elliott, RN10.000000000000052.0000000000000644.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur les problèmes possibles associés aux tubulures et aux cathéters. La taille des veines peut limiter les types de cathéters vasculaires utilisés sur un bébé prématuré.</p><p>La taille et le nombre de veines disponibles peuvent limiter le choix des types de cathéters qui sont utilisés sur un bébé prématuré. Si les veines sont trop petites ou difficiles d’accès, un cathéter central peut être requis, même pour un bébé pour lequel on ne prévoit pas avoir besoin de traitements au-delà de quelques jours.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La taille et le nombre de veines disponibles peuvent limiter le choix des types de cathéters qui sont utilisés sur un bébé prématuré.</li> <li>Quelques problèmes qui peuvent subvenir avec les tubulures et les cathéters comprennent le positionnement, le saignement, la phlébite, l’infection, le blocage, le cathéter interstitiel, la brûlure par tubulure intraveineuse périphérique, un caillot occasionné par un cathéter, l’épanchement pleural, la tamponnade cardiaque et le spasme artériel.</li></ul>

 

 

Possible problems with lines and catheters1850.00000000000Possible problems with lines and cathetersPossible problems with lines and cathetersPEnglishNeonatology;OtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BodyNAProceduresPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Elliott, RN10.000000000000052.0000000000000644.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about possible problems with lines and catheters. The size of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby.</p><p>The size or number of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby. If the veins are too small or difficult to access, a central line may be required even for a baby who is not expected to need treatment beyond a few days. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The size of a vein or the number of available veins can limit which type of vascular line is used on a premature baby.</li> <li>Possible problems that can occur with lines and catheters include placement, bleeding, phlebitis, infection, blockage, interstitial catheter, peripheral intravenous line burn, catheter clot, pleural effusion, cardiac tamponade, and arterial spasm.</li></ul><h2>Placement</h2> <p>The correct position of any vascular line, whether arterial or venous, can be confirmed using different types of imaging equipment including chest X-rays, fluoroscopy, or ultrasound. Although staff who insert venous lines are highly trained, placement of the line can sometimes be difficult. It is possible that several attempts at insertion will be required to get the tip of the catheter in the proper place. This may occur due to the small size, shape, or fragility of the veins. </p> <h2>Bleeding</h2> <p>There may be a small amount of external bleeding where the catheter is placed immediately following insertion of any line. This bleeding usually stops within an hour or so. If a central or arterial line accidentally become dislodged or disconnected, there is a possibility of significant blood loss. The doctor will determine if that blood loss needs to be replaced. </p> <h2>Phlebitis</h2> <p>Although catheters are very small, they can cause irritation called phlebitis, inside the vein wall. Usually, phlebitis does not last more than 24 hours. Sometimes, removing the catheter is necessary if it does not resolve. </p> <h2>Infection</h2> <p>Since vascular access provides access from the outside world to the inside of a baby’s body, infection is possible. Infection rates differ by type of access but on the whole are low and, in most cases, easily treated with antibiotics. Infections may require catheter removal in some instances. </p> <h2>Blockage</h2> <p>Sometimes intravenous lines can become blocked. In these cases, they may be unblocked by flushes of fluid or may need to be replaced. </p> <h2>Interstitial catheter</h2> <p>This is when the catheter becomes dislodged from the vein and the IV fluid infuses into the tissue around the vein. This can cause the tissue to become quite swollen and red. </p> <h2>Peripheral intravenous line (PIV) burn</h2> <p>This is when the catheter becomes dislodged from the vein and the IV fluid infuses into the tissue around the vein, causing the tissue to burn. These types of issues are rare but can be serious and they may require a plastic surgeon to determine the best treatment. </p> <h2>Catheter clot</h2> <p>This is when the catheter of an arterial or venous line acquires a blood clot at the tip. This sometimes results in the catheter having to be removed; depending on the size and location of the clot, these babies sometimes need to undergo anticoagulation therapy over a course of several weeks in order to dissolve the clot. </p> <h2>Pleural effusion</h2> <p>This is when the tip of a central line catheter moves out of the vein into the pleural cavity, which is the space surrounding the lungs. The IV fluid infusing through the catheter then infuses into the pleural space. Over time, this fluid can create breathing difficulty and must be drained by a doctor. The fluid is drained by inserting a hollow needle through the chest wall, into the pleural space. </p> <h2>Cardiac tamponade</h2> <p>This is when the tip of a central line catheter moves out of the vein into the pericardial sac, which is the space that surrounds the heart. The IV fluid infusing through the catheter subsequently fills this space which puts pressure on the heart, making the pumping action of the heart difficult. </p> <h2>Arterial spasm</h2> <p>When a baby has an arterial line, sometimes the artery goes into a spasm, which does not allow the artery blood to flow normally. The skin above or below the arterial line becomes white. Usually this problem resolves on its own. Sometimes, if it does not resolve, the arterial line must be removed. </p>Possible problems with lines and catheters

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