Palliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyPPalliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyPalliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyEnglishOtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Newman, MD, FRCPCLori A. Ives-Baine, RN, BScN10.000000000000056.0000000000000450.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about how an entire family is affected by the decision of palliative care. Read about easing the transition both for a premature baby and their family.</p><p>The death of a premature baby will affect everyone in your family, from your spouse, to your other children, to grandparents and other extended family. Someone from the palliative care service is available to speak to your whole family if requested. This will open the door to discussions about everyone's fears and concerns. It's important to be aware that each family member may be in a different place when it comes to being able to accept the reality that a baby is dying. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Each family member will grieve in a different way and may be in a different place when it comes to being able to accept the reality that a baby is dying.</li> <li>Your other children need to have accurate information that is appropriate for their developmental level.</li></ul>
Préparation de votre famille en vue des soins palliatifsPPréparation de votre famille en vue des soins palliatifsPalliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyFrenchOtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Newman, MD, FRCPCLori A. Ives-Baine, RN, BScN10.000000000000056.0000000000000450.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez au sujet de la manière dont une famille entière est touchée par la décision de soins palliatifs. Lisez au sujet de faciliter la transition autant pour le bébé prématuré que pour sa famille.</p><p>La mort d’un bébé prématuré touchera tous les membres de votre famille, de votre conjoint, à vos autres enfants, aux grands-parents, et aux autres membres de la famille élargie. Une personne du service des soins palliatifs est disponible pour s’adresser à toute votre famille sur demande. Cela ouvrira la porte à des conversations au sujet des craintes et des inquiétudes de chacun. Il est important d’être bien conscient que chaque membre de la famille peut être à un stade différent en ce qui a trait à son habileté à accepter la réalité que le bébé lutte contre la mort.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le deuil sera vécu de façon différente par chaque membre de la famille et chacun peut être à un stade différent en ce qui a trait à son habileté à accepter la réalité que le bébé est mourant.</li> <li>Les frères et les sœurs ont besoin d’avoir des renseignements exacts et appropriés à leur niveau de compréhension.</li></ul>

 

 

Palliative care for premature babies: Preparing your family1857.00000000000Palliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyPalliative care for premature babies: Preparing your familyPEnglishOtherPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANASupport, services and resourcesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZChristine Newman, MD, FRCPCLori A. Ives-Baine, RN, BScN10.000000000000056.0000000000000450.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about how an entire family is affected by the decision of palliative care. Read about easing the transition both for a premature baby and their family.</p><p>The death of a premature baby will affect everyone in your family, from your spouse, to your other children, to grandparents and other extended family. Someone from the palliative care service is available to speak to your whole family if requested. This will open the door to discussions about everyone's fears and concerns. It's important to be aware that each family member may be in a different place when it comes to being able to accept the reality that a baby is dying. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Each family member will grieve in a different way and may be in a different place when it comes to being able to accept the reality that a baby is dying.</li> <li>Your other children need to have accurate information that is appropriate for their developmental level.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="Brother holding sleeping baby" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/LIB_bereavementpic_18_EN.jpg" /> </figure> <p>As much as possible, families need to focus on the time that they have with their baby and make the most out of that time.</p><p>It is important for information to be shared with all family members, taking into account the age of siblings, for example, and the desire for information. </p><p>Parents are often torn between spending time with their sick baby in the NICU and maintaining their other family and professional responsibilities. It can be helpful when families set goals together for this time. This may involve having grandparents or other relatives spend time with older children at home, or having someone else be with your baby in the NICU so that you can have time with the rest of your family. </p><h2>Issues for siblings</h2><p>Healthy siblings can become the forgotten family members. Siblings need to have accurate information appropriate to their developmental level. They should also understand why their parents are absent more than usual.</p><p>Young children need to know the answers to these questions:</p><ul><li>How and why did their baby brother or sister become ill? </li><li>Did they cause the illness in any way? </li><li>Will they catch the same illness? </li><li>What will happen to the family after the sibling dies?</li><li>Are they still a big brother or sister when the baby dies? </li><li>Will mommy and daddy always be sad?</li></ul><p>Siblings need the opportunity to talk about their feelings with someone they trust. Since they may not want to burden their parents, it is important to help them connect with an appropriate person. </p><h3>How do you discuss death with your other children?</h3><p>Siblings need to be given the opportunity to be a part of their ill sibling’s death, including the funeral — regardless of their age. At the same time, siblings should not be forced to be a part of the experience. </p><p>Speak plainly and honestly, providing just as much detail as is necessary depending on the child’s age, when you talk about the concept of death. Hearing the news may be upsetting. Depending on your child's age and level of maturity, they will likely need to think things over, absorb the information, and come back with more questions. You may need to have this discussion several times. Do your best to answer your child’s questions but don't worry if you do not have all the answers. ​</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/LIB_bereavementpic_18_EN.jpgPalliative care for premature babies: Preparing your family

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