Ongoing care of brain and behaviour problemsOOngoing care of brain and behaviour problemsOngoing care of brain and behaviour problemsEnglishNeurologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BrainNervous systemHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZHilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000042.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about ongoing care for brain and behavior difficulties that may arise for your premature baby. Complications caused by a shunt are discussed.</p><p>Probably the biggest fear parents of premature babies have is that there has been some sort of lasting damage to the brain and the baby will not develop normally. Depending on their experience in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), a reasonable prediction of your baby’s abilities in terms of physical, mental, or behavioural ability may not be possible. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>It is very difficult to predict the outcome for a baby with a brain injury, as disability from brain injury can take months to appear.</li> <li>Sequential scans of the baby’s brain will be done to evaluate whether there is a need for an intervention such as shunt surgery.</li> <li>Complications from a shunt can occur and are usually caused by blockage in the tubing or an infection.</li></ul>
Soins continus des troubles du cerveau et du comportementSSoins continus des troubles du cerveau et du comportementOngoing care of brain and behaviour problemsFrenchNeurologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BrainNervous systemHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZHilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000042.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez au sujet des soins continus relatifs aux problèmes du cerveau et du comportement qui peuvent survenir chez votre bébé prématuré. Les complications reliées à une dérivation sont présentées.</p><p>Il est probable que la plus grande inquiétude des parents de bébés prématurés soit qu'il y a des lésions au cerveau et que le bébé ne se développe pas normalement. Selon ce qu’il aura vécu à l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs (UNSI), il peut être impossible d’émettre de prédire raisonnablement les capacités physiques, mentales, et comportementales de votre bébé prématuré.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il est très difficile de prédire les répercussions d’une lésion cérébrale chez un bébé puisque les invalidités causées par une lésion cérébrale peuvent prendre plusieurs mois à se manifester.</li> <li>Des examens périodiques du cerveau du bébé seront effectués afin d’évaluer si une intervention est nécessaire, comme une dérivation chirurgicale.</li> <li>Les complications reliées à une dérivation sont habituellement occasionnées par une obstruction de la tubulure ou par une infection.</li></ul>

 

 

Ongoing care of brain and behaviour problems1865.00000000000Ongoing care of brain and behaviour problemsOngoing care of brain and behaviour problemsOEnglishNeurologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)BrainNervous systemHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZHilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000042.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about ongoing care for brain and behavior difficulties that may arise for your premature baby. Complications caused by a shunt are discussed.</p><p>Probably the biggest fear parents of premature babies have is that there has been some sort of lasting damage to the brain and the baby will not develop normally. Depending on their experience in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), a reasonable prediction of your baby’s abilities in terms of physical, mental, or behavioural ability may not be possible. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>It is very difficult to predict the outcome for a baby with a brain injury, as disability from brain injury can take months to appear.</li> <li>Sequential scans of the baby’s brain will be done to evaluate whether there is a need for an intervention such as shunt surgery.</li> <li>Complications from a shunt can occur and are usually caused by blockage in the tubing or an infection.</li></ul><p>The extent of a brain injury as revealed by imaging technology such as head ultrasounds and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not necessarily predict the future ability of the child. Predicting the future effect of a specific type or severity of brain injury can be reasonably accurate in some cases, particularly in severe injury. However, a prognosis may be inaccurate, particularly when injury appears to be mild on brain imaging. </p> <p>Also, the disability arising from brain injury is usually not immediately apparent but may take months to appear.</p> <p>Brain injuries tend to fall into the category of “the damage is done and cannot be undone,” in the sense that the actual physical damage cannot be repaired. Whether this translates into disability is another story. There is usually no risk of re-injury in a premature baby who has suffered brain damage, but the extent of the injury may not be immediately apparent. Therefore, sequential scans of the baby’s brain will be done to evaluate whether there is a need for an intervention such as shunt surgery. In this situation, blood in the cavities inside the brain called the ventricles blocks the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and causes a build-up of pressure. This pressure must be relieved by placing a small catheter, called a shunt, inside the brain and draining off the excess fluid into another part of the body, usually the abdomen. </p> <h2>Complications from a shunt</h2> <p>If your child starts to experience headache, neck pain, nausea, vomiting, loss of consciousness, or seizures, they may be experiencing a problem with their shunt, if they have one. Another possible sign of a shunt problem is the development of syrinx, which is the build-up of fluid in the spine, causing decreased sensation in the neck, shoulders, and upper arms, or weakness in the arms or legs. Other more subtle symptoms may include a decrease in their intellectual function or school performance. </p> <p>Shunt problems are usually due to a blockage in the tubing or an infection. When a shunt blockage is suspected, your child’s doctor will first determine the site of the malfunction using a CT scan or MRI scan. A preoperative CSF specimen may be taken from a shunt tap to rule out the possibility of infection. </p> <p>If a shunt is not working well, your child will need to have an operation to fix the problem. The neurosurgeon will either clear the blockage or replace the shunt. </p> <h3>Shunt lengthening</h3> <p>As your child grows, the length of their shunt tubing may become too short. Periodic lengthening of the shunt may be necessary to accommodate your child’s growth. If this is required, surgery will be performed to connect additional tubing to the shunt. </p> <h4>More information</h4> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1771&language=English">Brain and Behaviour </a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1807&language=English">Diagnosis of Brain and Behaviour Problems </a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1846&language=English">Treatment of Brain and Behaviour Problems </a></li></ul>Ongoing care of brain and behaviour problems

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