Typical ongoing problemsTTypical ongoing problemsTypical ongoing problemsEnglishNAPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC Hilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000038.0000000000000770.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about long-term problems occurring in children due to prematurity. These problems may be physical, developmental, or behavioural in nature.</p><p>There are typical ongoing problems that may affect a premature baby. These include physical, neurodevelopmental, behavioural, emotional, and educational problems. The degree to which a premature baby is affected by these problems will depend on a number of factors including degree of prematurity, birth weight and if they experienced complications during or after birth.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Chronic morbidity describes medical problems that endure over time, which can range from mild to severe depending on the child.</li> <li>It is not always possible to know at first what type of a neurodevelopmental condition might affect a premature baby or to what degree of severity.</li> <li>Behavioural, emotional and educational complications may not become apparent until later in life, until a child is actually at school.</li></ul>
Problèmes permanents typiquesPProblèmes permanents typiquesTypical ongoing problemsFrenchNAPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC Hilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000038.0000000000000770.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur les problèmes affligeant les prématurés. Ces problèmes peuvent être physiques, développementaux ou comportementaux de nature. </p><p>Il existe des problèmes chroniques typiques qui peuvent affecter un bébé prématuré. Ceux-ci comprennent des troubles physiques, neurodéveloppementaux, comportementaux, émotifs et éducatifs. Le degré auquel un bébé prématuré est affecté par ces problèmes dépendra d’un bon nombre de facteurs dont son degré de prématurité, son poids de naissance et s’il a été exposé à des complications pendant et après la naissance.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le terme « morbidité chronique » désigne les problèmes médicaux qui persistent avec le temps et qui sont catégorisés de légers à sévères en fonction de l’enfant.</li> <li>Il n’est pas toujours possible de connaître dès le départ quel type de trouble neurodéveloppemental pourrait affecter un bébé prématuré ni à quel niveau de gravité.</li> <li>Des complications comportementales, émotionnelles et éducatives pourraient n’apparaître que plus tard dans la vie, lorsque l’enfant entre à l’école.</li></ul>

 

 

Typical ongoing problems1874.00000000000Typical ongoing problemsTypical ongoing problemsTEnglishNAPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC Hilary Whyte, MSc, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, FRCPC12.000000000000038.0000000000000770.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about long-term problems occurring in children due to prematurity. These problems may be physical, developmental, or behavioural in nature.</p><p>There are typical ongoing problems that may affect a premature baby. These include physical, neurodevelopmental, behavioural, emotional, and educational problems. The degree to which a premature baby is affected by these problems will depend on a number of factors including degree of prematurity, birth weight and if they experienced complications during or after birth.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Chronic morbidity describes medical problems that endure over time, which can range from mild to severe depending on the child.</li> <li>It is not always possible to know at first what type of a neurodevelopmental condition might affect a premature baby or to what degree of severity.</li> <li>Behavioural, emotional and educational complications may not become apparent until later in life, until a child is actually at school.</li></ul><h2>Physical problems: chronic morbidity</h2> <p>Chronic morbidity describes medical problems that will endure over time. These can range from mild to severe. For example, a baby born with immature lungs who requires a ventilator for days or weeks in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can grow up with a reduced lung capacity, which will limit their ability to be active. The lungs may not grow properly and as the child grows to adult size, their lungs may have difficulty keeping up with their body’s increasing oxygen needs. This child is considered to have a chronic morbidity. </p> <p>In addition to lung problems, most commonly, premature babies are also at risk for eye and ear problems. Often the source of these physical disabilities resides in the brain. </p> <p>Anticipating and identifying complications that are likely to become chronic can go a long way towards minimizing the impact the condition will have as a baby grows. Parents and children must learn how to manage chronic conditions in order not to make the problem worse and to live the fullest possible life in spite of the condition. Additionally, if a particular chronic condition can benefit from therapy, then in general, the earlier therapy begins, the better children do as they grow. There are limits, though; some chronic conditions may not improve no matter what strategies parents and caregivers provide. </p> <h2>Neurodevelopmental problems</h2> <p>Medical complications affecting the brain often have long-term implications for a child’s development. These may appear immediately or may only become apparent later, sometimes years later. The range of severity of these types of problems is enormous. For example, some babies who have had a brain injury will develop cerebral palsy (CP), a condition that affects body movement and coordination. CP can be so mild that it is barely noticeable and will have very little impact on a child’s life. It can also be very severe. In extreme cases, CP can leave a child unable to control their movements at all, meaning they will be restricted to a wheelchair and need help to perform basic tasks such as eating. </p> <h2>Types of neurodevelopmental problems</h2> <p>Conditions such as a severe case of CP are said to be global in effect: motor skills, or the body’s ability to move, are affected throughout the body. Other less severe neurodevelopmental problems may affect only fine motor skills. For example, a child may be able to walk reasonably well, but may have difficulty with more precise activities such as writing with a pen or pencil. Other neurodevelopmental problems are more specific to individual regions of the brain, for example, affecting vision or hearing rather than the body as a whole. </p> <p>It is not always possible to know at first how much or what type of a neurodevelopmental condition will affect a premature baby in the long run. </p> <h2>Behavioural, emotional, and educational implications</h2> <p>In addition to body movement and other physical effects, neurological problems can affect behaviour, emotion, and a child’s ability to learn. Again, the range of severity of these types of problems is large. Some children are severely affected, others less so. As with most complications associated with prematurity, the severity is related to how small and how premature the baby is at birth. Extremely premature babies are much more likely to develop learning disabilities than mildly premature babies, for example. </p> <p>Typically, these types of challenges, though perhaps anticipated due to brain injury, will not become apparent until later in life. Learning disabilities, for example, often do not surface until a child is actually at school. </p> <h2>Adaptability</h2> <p>Brain injury leading to neurological impairments will likely affect function but may not necessarily produce what is generally regarded as a handicap. Many premature babies with developmental impairments have gone on to lead healthy productive lives with little in the way of limitations. </p> <p>If the goal in life is to be happy and to spend time doing meaningful and fulfilling activities including work, many premature babies with disabilities will be able to lead happy productive lives. Whether this will be possible or not has to do with the type and severity of the disability, the amount of support the child gets, and their ability to adapt. A productive and happy life also has to do with expectations: a baby with chronic lung disease or mild cerebral palsy will not grow up to be an astronaut. However, though the possibility may have existed, most full-term babies do not grow up to be astronauts either. </p> <p>In general with disabilities, setting realistic goals within the confines of the disability and striving for and being encouraged to reach those goals is often enough for many to become productive and happy people. </p>Typical ongoing problems

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