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How to help attention and memoryHHow to help attention and memoryHow to help attention and memoryEnglishDevelopmentalPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych11.000000000000046.0000000000000266.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about recognizing attention and memory problems in a prematurely born child. Trouble with completing schoolwork and fidgeting are telltale signs.</p><p>There are multiple signs that your child may be struggling with attention and memory problems. Fortunately, there are various techniques and activities you can do with your child to help them improve these skills.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>If your child shows signs of attention or memory problems, talk to their teacher and family doctor to determine next steps.</li> <li>Problems with attention and memory will lead to problems in the classroom such as incomplete assignments and trouble learning.</li> <li>There are many techniques that parents can use to help their child's attention and memory problems.</li></ul>
Comment aider avec l’attention et la mémoireCComment aider avec l’attention et la mémoireHow to help attention and memoryFrenchNAPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych11.000000000000046.0000000000000266.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur la reconnaissance des troubles de l’attention et de la mémoire chez un enfant né prématurément. La difficulté à effectuer son travail scolaire et l’agitation sont des signes à surveiller.</p><p>Plusieurs signes peuvent indiquer que votre enfant éprouve de la difficulté d’attention et présente des problèmes de mémoire. Heureusement, plusieurs techniques et activités que vous pouvez faire avec votre enfant peuvent aider à développer ces habiletés.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Si votre enfant montre des signes de problème d’attention ou de mémoire, discutez avec son professeur ou son médecin de famille afin de déterminer les prochaines étapes.</li> <li>Les problèmes d’attention et de mémoire mèneront à des problèmes dans la classe comme la remise de travaux incomplets et des troubles d’apprentissage.</li> <li>Il existe plusieurs techniques que les parents peuvent employer afin que l’attention de votre enfant se développe et afin d’amoindrir ses troubles de mémoire.</li></ul>

 

 

How to help attention and memory1885.00000000000How to help attention and memoryHow to help attention and memoryHEnglishDevelopmentalPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych11.000000000000046.0000000000000266.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about recognizing attention and memory problems in a prematurely born child. Trouble with completing schoolwork and fidgeting are telltale signs.</p><p>There are multiple signs that your child may be struggling with attention and memory problems. Fortunately, there are various techniques and activities you can do with your child to help them improve these skills.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>If your child shows signs of attention or memory problems, talk to their teacher and family doctor to determine next steps.</li> <li>Problems with attention and memory will lead to problems in the classroom such as incomplete assignments and trouble learning.</li> <li>There are many techniques that parents can use to help their child's attention and memory problems.</li></ul><h2>Signs of attention and memory problems</h2><p>Attention and memory problems may be suspected if your school-aged child shows the following signs:</p><ul><li>appears restless and distractible </li><li>daydreams often </li><li>flits from activity to activity </li><li>has trouble listening to an entire story </li><li>is constantly fidgeting; cannot sit still </li><li>makes careless errors </li><li>never finishes school work </li><li>does not remember instructions </li><li>does not follow through on instructions </li><li>has trouble figuring out how to complete an activity </li><li>forgets materials needed to complete homework </li></ul><p>If your child is showing some or all of these signs, you could consider having your child assessed by a psychologist. A good first step would be to talk to your child’s classroom teacher and your family physician to see what resources might be available through the school board or in the community. </p><h2>Effects in the classroom</h2><p>If you have seen some of the signs listed above, there is a risk that your child will experience some of the following difficulties in the classroom. </p><ul><li>trouble following and carrying out instructions </li><li>missing key information during class lessons </li><li>incomplete assignments </li><li>trouble learning number facts </li><li>trouble learning complicated math procedures </li><li>trouble taking notes </li><li>trouble forming inferences, affecting reading comprehension </li></ul><p>If your child’s teacher had observed your child having some of these difficulties, it will be important to develop strategies to help your child learn in the classroom. The teacher will likely be able to think of a number of ways to help. </p><h2>How to help attention and memory</h2><p>The following suggestions are meant to be helpful in the home, but these techniques are also useful in the classroom.</p><ul><li>For very young children, put out only one or two toys to play with at a time. This will decrease distractibility and the tendency to move quickly from toy to toy. </li><li>Make sure your child is looking at you when instructions are given. Hold their chin lightly or remind the child to look at you before you give the instruction. This ensures that your child’s attention is focused on you and increases the likelihood that instructions will be processed. </li><li>Enroll your child in a nursery school or a daycare program with a well structured nursery program at three years of age. This will improve your child’s social skills and help them to learn routines and how to pay attention during group activities. </li><li>Break complicated instructions down into smaller chunks. This reduces the amount the child has to remember at one time. </li><li>Have your child repeat instructions immediately after hearing them. Tell them “Go get your coat, mitts and boots.” “What are you going to do?” This lets you check to see if your child has understood what to do. If they cannot repeat the instructions back, they have not understood or they have forgotten the instructions. </li><li>Teach your child to rehearse the instructions they hear. Begin by having them say the instructions out loud; as they improve, they can whisper or say the instructions mentally. This keeps the information from fading too quickly from memory. </li><li>Demonstrate how to complete a new task. Then have your child do it while you watch. Walking the child through examples shows them the exact sequence of steps to follow. </li><li>Play memory games: give sequences of actions or words to remember. Attach each action or word to an object. For example, put out three blocks: tap each block as you say each action. Point to the block as your child does the sequence. </li><li>Teach your child how to chunk words to be remembered: “fox, goat, cat, and zebra are all animals.” </li><li>For children who can read, write out the steps in the task. For children who cannot read, draw pictures or take photographs to remind them of routines or procedures. Then if your child forgets the sequence of steps, they have something to refer back to. </li><li>Explain reasons for doing a task in a particular order. The child may forget critical steps because they do not know why they are needed. </li><li>Show your child the finished product before they begin. This lets the child know what they are trying to accomplish. </li><li>Break the work into smaller amounts by folding the page in half, or covering up part of the page with another blank page. This reduces what has to be attended to at one time. </li><li>When learning something in a rote manner, teach only a small part at one time. Add on successive pieces once the earlier ones are learned. </li><li>Use a timer to keep the child working. Set manageable amounts of on-task time, for example, five to 10 minutes and give frequent breaks. Setting the timer makes the passage of time more concrete. Giving rest breaks reduces the chance for lapses in attention. </li></ul><h2>Resources</h2><h3>On the Web</h3><p> <a href="http://www.teachadhd.ca/Pages/default.aspx">www.TeachADHD.ca</a> </p><p>This is a comprehensive website developed for teachers by scientists at The Hospital for Sick Children. Although it pertains to children diagnosed with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the classroom strategies are useful for any children having problems with attention or working memory. </p><h3>Books<br></h3> <p> <strong>Teaching the Tiger: A Handbook for Individuals Involved in the Education of Students with Attention Deficit Disorders, Tourette Syndrome, or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder </strong></p><p>by Marilyn P. Dornbush and Sheryl K. Pruitt<br>Paperback: 268 pages<br>Publisher: Hope Press (1995)<br>ISBN: 1878267345 </p><p> <strong>The ADD Hyperactivity Handbook Schools</strong></p><p>by Harvey C. Parker<br>Paperback<br>Publisher: Specialty Press, Plantation , Florida (1998)<br>ISBN: 0962162922</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_to_help_attention_and_memory.jpgHow to help attention and memory

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