Mathematics: How to help your childMMathematics: How to help your childMathematics: How to help your childEnglishDevelopmentalToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych7.0000000000000065.0000000000000700.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>For all strands of the mathematics curriculum, workbooks are available that can be used to supplement school activities. When using workbooks, be sure to reward your child with stickers and/or praise after completing tasks and at the end of the session.</p><p>For all strands of the mathematics curriculum, workbooks are available that can be used to supplement school activities. Use the workbooks at the same time each day to build a routine.There are also computer programs that can help your child learn different aspects of math. Many of these programs can be used by children of different ages and abilities. These programs teach key concepts and provide drills. Use the software with your child, and then have them use it by themselves. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>For each math category, there are workbooks and computer programs to help your child develop their mathematical skills.</li></ul>
Comment aider avec les problèmes de mathématiquesCComment aider avec les problèmes de mathématiquesHow to help: MathematicsFrenchNAToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych7.0000000000000065.0000000000000700.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Pour tous les domaines du curriculum mathématique, des livres d’exercices sont offerts qui peuvent être utilisés en complément aux activités scolaires. Lorsque vous utilisez des livres d’exercices, assurez-vous de récompenser votre enfant en apposant des étiquettes gommées ou des compliments, ou les deux, après qu’il a accompli une tâche, ainsi qu’à la fin de la séance.</p><p>Pour tous les domaines du curriculum mathématique, des livres d’exercices sont offerts qui peuvent être utilisés en complément aux activités scolaires. Lorsque vous utilisez des livres d’exercices, assurez-vous de récompenser votre enfant en apposant des étiquettes gommées ou des compliments, ou les deux, après qu’il a accompli une tâche, ainsi qu’à la fin de la séance. Utilisez les livres d’exercices au même moment chaque jour afin d’établir une routine. Il existe aussi des didacticiels qui peuvent aider votre enfant à apprendre les différents aspects des mathématiques. Plusieurs de ces didacticiels peuvent être utilisés par des enfants de différents âges et habiletés. Ces didacticiels montrent des concepts clés et incluent des exercices. Utilisez le didacticiel avec votre enfant, et ensuite, laissez-le l’utiliser de lui-même. </p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Dans chaque catégorie mathématique, il existe des cahiers d’exercices et des logiciels afin d’aider votre enfant à développer ses habiletés mathématiques<br></li></ul>

 

 

Mathematics: How to help your child1899.00000000000Mathematics: How to help your childMathematics: How to help your childMEnglishDevelopmentalToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych7.0000000000000065.0000000000000700.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>For all strands of the mathematics curriculum, workbooks are available that can be used to supplement school activities. When using workbooks, be sure to reward your child with stickers and/or praise after completing tasks and at the end of the session.</p><p>For all strands of the mathematics curriculum, workbooks are available that can be used to supplement school activities. Use the workbooks at the same time each day to build a routine.There are also computer programs that can help your child learn different aspects of math. Many of these programs can be used by children of different ages and abilities. These programs teach key concepts and provide drills. Use the software with your child, and then have them use it by themselves. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>For each math category, there are workbooks and computer programs to help your child develop their mathematical skills.</li></ul><h2>Number sense and numeration</h2><p>Many premature children have limited working memory capacities. This weakness may slow the development of automatic number facts. You can facilitate the development of your child’s number sense, numeration, and math facts by engaging in the activities below:</p><ul><li>Count objects around the house and outside, such as cars on the street or signs on the road.</li><li>Match groups of objects or dots to the appropriate numerals. Have your child put the appropriate number of stickers on one side of an index card, and the appropriate numeral on the other. Cut the cards in half using a unique shape. Have your child find the parts that match.</li><li>To improve number recognition, have your child trace sandpaper numbers (used in the Montessori math curriculum), and draw numerals in sand.</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Hundreds Board</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hundreds_board_MISC_FLA_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>To develop number sequences beyond 10 and to help recognize recurring number sequences, make a Hundreds Board. Make patterns using numbers.</li><li>Play “Shop” with your child. Make tags for toys. Buy and sell toys for pennies.</li><li>Cook or bake with your child. This exposes them to math terms, measuring, and beginning fractions.</li><li>Play card games. To improve number recognition, play <em>Go Fish</em> or <em>Concentration</em>. To improve number sequence and more or less than concepts, play <em>War</em>, <em>Spit</em> or <em>Clock Solitaire</em>. To improve matching and adding skills, play <em>Casino</em>, <em>21</em>, <em>Solitaire</em>, and <em>Cribbage</em>. <em>Deal me In</em> by Margie Golick outlines many card games and the types of skills each game reinforces.</li><li>Play board games using dice that require counting such as <em>Snakes and Ladders</em> or <em>Monopoly</em>.</li><li>Make up simple addition and subtraction questions; solve these questions using candies, pennies, or buttons. Teach your child how to diagram the problem using sticks or circles like this: X X X + X X = 5.</li><li>Work on numerals and math facts such as addition and subtraction using flash cards.</li><li>For addition or subtraction, teach your child how to start with the biggest number and count up or down. For numbers up to 10, they can use their fingers. Teach how to use known facts to work out answers.</li><li>Use books of connect-the-dots puzzles to teach number sequences and help develop your child’s visuomotor skills.</li><li>Use workbooks with grade-appropriate number and word problems. Make copies of pages of examples of number problems, for example, addition and subtraction, so that your child can do them more than once. Over a period of days, begin to time them and reward them for completing the examples more quickly. This will help automate retrieval of math facts.</li></ul><h2>Measurement</h2><ul><li>Teach math terms such as bigger/smaller, more/less, and so on. Start with which toys are bigger/smaller, then which group is bigger/ smaller. Introduce more/less as meaning the same as bigger/smaller.</li><li>Measure objects with a ruler, and place objects in order of size. Talk about which objects are bigger/longer and smaller/shorter.</li><li>Count piles of coins. Talk about which pile has more/less.</li><li>Play <em>War</em> with a regular deck of cards or try the <em>Math War</em> card game.</li></ul><h2>Geometry and spatial sense</h2><ul><li>Many premature children have visuospatial difficulties. These weaknesses may affect the development of math skills in this strand. Teach them to develop verbal strategies for spatial problems. Have them say the problems aloud initially, and then have your child use self-talk, first speaking the instructions aloud, and then “speaking” the instructions mentally.</li><li>Teach spatial terms including above/below, behind/in front, and near/far. Play games using these terms to position toys.</li><li>Teach names of two-dimensional shapes, for example circle, square, rectangle, rhombus, pentagon.</li><li>Use books of mazes to help develop your child’s visual problem-solving, planning, and visuomotor skills.</li></ul><h2>Patterning and algebra</h2><ul><li>Look for and point out recurring patterns. Make up patterns using colour, size, shapes, rhythms, or actions. As your child improves in recognizing patterns, use sequences of numbers or letters.</li><li>Put objects in order by size, by height, and by weight.</li></ul><h2>Data management and probability</h2><ul><li>Teach equivalent amounts, beginning with pennies and nickels.</li><li>Give your child a weekly allowance. Have them count their money and divide it up into saving and spending piles. Each week, have them to graph how much they have in savings and for spending.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hundreds_board_MISC_FLA_EN.jpgMathematics: How to help your child

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