Reading and writingRReading and writingReading and writingEnglishDevelopmentalToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych9.0000000000000045.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Following the development of spoken language, children develop reading and, later, writing skills. This page describes what is usually expected from your child at different grade levels, in terms of reading and writing accomplishments. It should be noted that this is a guide and not all children learn at the same pace.</p><p>Following the development of spoken language, children develop reading and, later, writing skills. This page describes what is usually expected from your child at different grade levels, in terms of reading and writing accomplishments. It should be noted that this is a guide and not all children learn at the same pace.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The mechanics of writing involve holding a pencil and making shapes of letters; written expression is using language to communicate ideas in writing.</li><li>The type of help a child needs will depend on which category of writing they have difficulty in.</li><li>While not all children learn at the same pace, there are certain writing milestones most children will achieve in each grade level.</li> </ul><br>
Lire et écrireLLire et écrireReading and writingFrenchNAToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych9.0000000000000045.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Après le développement du langage verbal, les enfants développent la lecture et, plus tard, les habiletés pour l’écriture. Cette page décrit ce qui est normalement attendu de votre enfant à différents niveaux scolaires, en ce qui a trait à l’apprentissage.<br></p><p>Après le développement du langage verbal, l’enfant développe ses habiletés de lecture, et plus tard ses habiletés d’écriture. Cette page décrit ce qui est attendu de votre enfant à chaque niveau scolaire, en ce qui concerne la lecture et l’écriture. Notez qu’il s’agit d’un guide et que tous les enfants n’apprennent pas au même rythme.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul> <li>La mécanique de l’écriture implique de tenir un crayon et de former les lettres; l’expression écrite implique d’utiliser le langage afin de communiquer des idées par écrit.</li><li>Le type d’aide dont un enfant a besoin dépend de la catégorie dans laquelle il éprouve des difficultés.</li><li>Bien que tous les enfants n’apprennent pas au même rythme, il existe certains jalons d’écriture que la plupart des enfants atteindront à une année scolaire donnée.</li></ul>

 

 

Reading and writing1901.00000000000Reading and writingReading and writingREnglishDevelopmentalToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZVirginia Frisk, Ph.D., C. Psych9.0000000000000045.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Following the development of spoken language, children develop reading and, later, writing skills. This page describes what is usually expected from your child at different grade levels, in terms of reading and writing accomplishments. It should be noted that this is a guide and not all children learn at the same pace.</p><p>Following the development of spoken language, children develop reading and, later, writing skills. This page describes what is usually expected from your child at different grade levels, in terms of reading and writing accomplishments. It should be noted that this is a guide and not all children learn at the same pace.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The mechanics of writing involve holding a pencil and making shapes of letters; written expression is using language to communicate ideas in writing.</li><li>The type of help a child needs will depend on which category of writing they have difficulty in.</li><li>While not all children learn at the same pace, there are certain writing milestones most children will achieve in each grade level.</li> </ul><br><p>Parents can be a huge help when their child is learning to read and write. Children become best at what they do most. Reading and writing should not simply be another activity that is only done at school. Reading and writing should become daily activities around the house as well as at school. As a start, parents should find out what is being taught each week in school and try to reinforce those lessons at home. Skills that your child is learning, such as sound-letter associations, can be practiced quite effectively through simple games.</p><p>Writing can be thought of in two broad categories: the mechanics of writing, such as holding the pencil, making the shapes of letters, and so on; and written expression, which is using language in a written form to communicate ideas. As one can imagine, this is an important distinction because a problem with the ability to form letters properly is very different from clearly expressing ideas. A child who has mastered the mechanics of writing may still have a problem expressing ideas in a written form. </p><p>If difficulties with writing emerge, parents should take note whether the problem or problems are of a mechanical or expressive nature or both. This will make a difference in the type of help that would most benefit the child. </p><h2>By the end of senior kindergarten</h2><p>By the end of senior kindergarten, your child should:</p><ul><li>show an awareness of conventions in written material. For example, they should understand that text is written left to right, words have spaces between them, and that words have both capital and lowercase letters. </li><li>recognize the title of a book. They should be able to use illustrations to understand the text and tell the story from the pictures. </li><li>identify most letters of the alphabet </li><li>recognize that words consist of beginning, middle, and final sounds </li><li>understand that letters represent sounds and written words convey meaning </li><li>know most of the basic sound-letter associations </li><li>read labels and familiar signs, and use phonics to sound out simple words </li><li>use word order and knowledge of sounds to identify and predict the next word in simple text </li><li>use a variety of tools to communicate, including crayons, paper, the computer, chalkboard, and markers </li><li>contribute words or sentences to a class narrative written down by the teacher </li><li>print most letters of the alphabet </li><li>print their own name, names of family members, and some short words, for example “cat” and “dad” </li><li>write messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, letters, and phonics </li></ul><h2>By the end of "Grade" One </h2><p>By the end of "Grade" One, your child should be able to: </p><ul><li>retell a simple story in proper sequence and predict what happens </li><li>follow simply worded written directions </li><li>read a variety of simple materials such as signs, books, rhymes, and children’s reference books </li><li>read independently, using strategies appropriate for their grade </li><li>use pictures and illustrations to figure out the meaning of new words </li><li>use knowledge of sentence structure to understand sentences </li><li>use phonics to decode or spell unfamiliar words </li><li>write simple but complete sentences </li><li>correctly form the plural of single-syllable words </li><li>use periods, commas, and capitals when reading or writing </li><li>correctly spell words that have been identified by the teacher on charts or lists in the room, or on individual word lists </li><li>use capitals to begin sentences and to differentiate names, days of the week, or months of the year</li><li>print legibly </li><li>leave spaces between words when writing </li></ul><h2>By the end of "Grade" Three </h2><p>By the end of "Grade" Three, your child should be able to: </p><ul><li>read a variety of fiction and non-fiction books </li><li>read aloud clearly and with expression </li><li>identify and restate the main idea in a story and cite supporting details </li><li>identify and describe some elements of stories, such as the plot, central idea, characters, and setting </li><li>distinguish fact from fiction </li><li>begin to make inferences, for example, about what might happen next in a story </li><li>use knowledge of word order to determine the meaning of sentences </li><li>use context, break a word into syllables, use a dictionary and phonics to determine unfamiliar words </li><li>use punctuation to help understand what they read </li><li>use correct subject-verb agreement when writing </li><li>use nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs correctly </li><li>use irregular plurals correctly such as <em>deer</em>, <em>children</em> </li><li>use apostrophes in contractions, for example, <em>can not = can’t</em></li><li>use exclamations </li><li>use phonics and spelling rules when spelling </li><li>use a variety of sources to check spelling of unfamiliar words </li><li>divide words into syllables </li><li>use prefixes, suffixes, and compound words </li><li>use titles and subheadings to organize writing </li><li>print legibly and start to use cursive writing (handwriting) instead of printing </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/reading_and_writing_premature_babies.jpgReading and writing

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