Preparing for adulthoodPPreparing for adulthoodPreparing for adulthoodEnglishDevelopmentalTeen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000047.0000000000000595.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Whether parents like it or not, at some point their child will grow up and leave the nest. Part of parenting is preparing a child for the responsibility they must take for their own health and happiness.</p><p>Many parents have difficulty encouraging their children to become more and more independent as they grow older. Perhaps they fear for their children’s safety or are simply reluctant because they always imagine their growing youngster as the tiny baby they initially brought home. Regardless what the reason is, parents of both full-term and premature babies often have this trouble. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Parents of premature babies and parents of children who have had some kind of childhood illness may have more difficulty letting go than most.</li> <li>A child who has been encouraged to face challenges and take on more responsibilities as they grow will be in a much better position as an adult.</li> <li>There are few longer-term studies on the adult prospects of children born prematurely.</li></ul>
En préparation pour la vie adulteEEn préparation pour la vie adultePreparing for adulthoodFrenchNATeen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000047.0000000000000595.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Que cela plaise aux parents ou non, un jour, leur enfant grandira et quittera le nid familial. L’art d’être parent inclut la préparation de l’enfant à la responsabilité qu’il doit prendre pour sa santé et son bonheur.</p><p>Beaucoup de parents ont de la difficulté à encourager leurs enfants à devenir de plus en plus indépendants en vieillissant. Peut-être ont-ils peur pour la sécurité de leurs enfants ou sont simplement réticents parce qu’ils reconnaissent toujours le petit bébé qu’ils ont ramené à la maison dans leur jeune qui grandit. Peu importe la raison, beaucoup de parents de bébés prématurés et à terme éprouvent ce sentiment.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les parents des bébés prématurés et les parents des enfants qui ont été atteints d’une maladie infantile particulière peuvent éprouver plus de difficulté à lâcher prise que les autres parents.</li> <li>Un enfant qui a été encouragé à faire face aux défis et à prendre davantage de responsabilités en grandissant sera mieux outillé à l’âge adulte.</li> <li>Il existe peu d’études à long terme sur le devenir à l’âge adulte d’enfants nés prématurément.</li></ul>

 

 

Preparing for adulthood1904.00000000000Preparing for adulthoodPreparing for adulthoodPEnglishDevelopmentalTeen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000047.0000000000000595.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Whether parents like it or not, at some point their child will grow up and leave the nest. Part of parenting is preparing a child for the responsibility they must take for their own health and happiness.</p><p>Many parents have difficulty encouraging their children to become more and more independent as they grow older. Perhaps they fear for their children’s safety or are simply reluctant because they always imagine their growing youngster as the tiny baby they initially brought home. Regardless what the reason is, parents of both full-term and premature babies often have this trouble. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Parents of premature babies and parents of children who have had some kind of childhood illness may have more difficulty letting go than most.</li> <li>A child who has been encouraged to face challenges and take on more responsibilities as they grow will be in a much better position as an adult.</li> <li>There are few longer-term studies on the adult prospects of children born prematurely.</li></ul><p>Parents of premature babies and parents of children who have had some kind of childhood illness may have more difficulty letting go than most. They imagine their child as fragile and in need of extra protection. For some children, this need for extra protection may in fact be a wise strategy: children who are intellectually impaired in a significant way should probably have certain restrictions put on them for their own protection. In many cases, however, parents are simply overprotecting their child and, as a result, stifling their development. A child who is coddled because their parents are unnecessarily worried about their “fragility” will get less of an opportunity to develop into a responsible independent adult. </p><p>All parents must walk a line between protecting their children and allowing them to be challenged into reaching their full potential. Challenges are by nature risky to some extent. At minimum, a child may “fail” a challenge and have to cope with the failure. Or, they may be injured in some way. This is how children learn to become independent and responsible for their own actions. </p><p>Parent must remember that while a child’s physical health is important, so is their self esteem and general emotional health, which cannot be developed without some physical risks to the child. A fear of minor physical injury or of failure should not become an excuse for overprotection. Being perfectly healthy is not a guarantee of fulfillment. </p><p>For parents who have children with a disability, the fine line between protection and encouraging a child to challenge themselves may be difficult. There may in fact be activities that the child should avoid or take extra precautions doing. Parents should approach their family doctor or other professionals at follow-up clinics to get guidance on these matters. As much as any child should be encouraged, the expectations that parents have placed on their child should be grounded in reality. As should a child’s own expectations. </p><h2>Taking responsibility</h2><p>Whether parents like it or not, at some point their child will grow up and leave the nest. Part of parenting is preparing a child for the responsibility they must take for their own health and happiness. A child who has been encouraged to face challenges and take on more responsibilities as they grow will be in a much better position as an adult.</p><h2>Long-term outcomes into adulthood</h2><p>There are few longer-term studies on the adult prospects of children born prematurely. This is not a surprise in the least as it has only been in the last generation or so that the survival of premature babies has dramatically improved. </p><p>Preliminary data suggests that most premature babies grow to be productive adults almost as frequently and as fully as full-term babies. “Productive” in this sense means having achieved at school and gone on to be employed.</p><p>Despite this, there are several exceptions. Premature babies born with severe disabilities tend to not do as well as adults as other adults born without disabilities. Additionally, babies born extremely premature also tend to have a more difficult time as adults. There are some data to suggest that those in this category are more likely to have personality disorders as adults.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/preparing_for_adulthood_premature_babies.jpgPreparing for adulthood

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