Diagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesDDiagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesDiagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesEnglishNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPC12.000000000000043.0000000000000622.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the challenge of diagnosing a congenital heart defect. The symptoms can be obscured by other complications such as respiratory failure. </p><p>Congenital heart defects are rare and can be challenging to diagnose as symptoms can be difficult to detect. Severals diagnostic tests and procedures may be conducted on your baby to determine if they have a congenital heart defect.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Initial signs of a congenital heart defect can be subtle and symptoms can be obscured by other complications.</li> <li>Signs of a congenital heart defect include a heart murmur, abnormal heart rhythm, heart failure, abnormal blood pressure, and cyanosis.</li> <li>Diagnostic tests include an X-ray, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization.<br></li></ul>
Diagnostic des cardiopathies congénitalesDDiagnostic des cardiopathies congénitalesDiagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesFrenchNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPC12.000000000000043.0000000000000622.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignez-vous sur les défis entourant le diagnostic d’une cardiopathie congénitale. Les symptômes d’une anomalie peuvent être éclipsés par d’autres complications comme l’insuffisance respiratoire.</p><p>Les cardiopathies congénitales, aussi connues sous l’appellation malformations cardio-vasculaires congénitales ou MCVC, sont rares. Bien qu’elles ne soient pas réservées aux bébés prématurés, certaines cardiopathies peuvent présenter un risque que le fœtus naisse prématurément.</p> <p>Il existe plusieurs types de cardiopathies congénitales, certaines plus graves que d’autres. Plus un bébé est prématuré, plus il lui est difficile de traiter l’anomalie. Plusieurs cardiopathies sont traitées au moyen d’une intervention chirurgicale, et une certaine quantité d’endurance est requise pour soutenir une telle procédure. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les premiers signes d’une cardiopathie congénitale peuvent être subtils et les symptômes d’une anomalie peuvent être éclipsés par d’autres complications.</li> <li>La cardiopathie congénitale est caractérisée par un souffle cardiaque, un rythme cardiaque atypique, une insuffisance cardiaque, une tension artérielle anormale et une cyanose.</li> <li>Les examens diagnostiques comprennent une radiographie, un électrocardiogramme, une échographie cardiaque et un cathétérisme cardiaque.</li></ul>

 

 

Diagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babies1906.00000000000Diagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesDiagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babiesDEnglishNeonatology;CardiologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)HeartCardiovascular systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZPatrick McNamara, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCPC12.000000000000043.0000000000000622.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the challenge of diagnosing a congenital heart defect. The symptoms can be obscured by other complications such as respiratory failure. </p><p>Congenital heart defects are rare and can be challenging to diagnose as symptoms can be difficult to detect. Severals diagnostic tests and procedures may be conducted on your baby to determine if they have a congenital heart defect.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Initial signs of a congenital heart defect can be subtle and symptoms can be obscured by other complications.</li> <li>Signs of a congenital heart defect include a heart murmur, abnormal heart rhythm, heart failure, abnormal blood pressure, and cyanosis.</li> <li>Diagnostic tests include an X-ray, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization.<br></li></ul><p>Congenital heart defects, also known as congenital cardiovascular malformations or CCVMs, are rare. Although they are not found only in premature babies, some heart defects may put a fetus at risk for premature birth.</p><p>There are many types of heart defects, some more serious than others. The more premature a baby is, the more difficult it may be for them to cope with the defect. Many heart defects are treated with surgery, and a certain amount of overall strength is needed to endure such a procedure.</p><h2>Diagnosis in general</h2><p>Diagnosing a congenital heart defect can be a challenge. The initial signs of a heart defect can be subtle, and the symptoms of a defect can be obscured by other complications such as respiratory failure. Clinical signs include a heart murmur, an abnormal heart rhythm, and heart failure. An abnormal blood pressure, either too high or too low, may also alert Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) staff to the possibility of a heart defect. Cyanosis, a bluish tinge to the skin which indicates a lack of oxygen getting to the body’s extremities, may also be a sign of a congenital heart defect, although it can be an indication of other problems.</p><h2>Seeing, hearing, and measuring the effect of a defect</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Electrocardiogram</span> <img alt="Electrocardiogram Pattern" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ECG_MEDIMG_PHO_EN.jpg" /> </figure> <p>When a congenital heart defect is suspected, a premature baby will be given an X-ray, which can reveal the size and shape of the heart and an indication of the amount of blood flowing through the lungs. Another diagnostic test is an electrocardiogram, which can give detailed information about the heart rate and rhythm; the electrocardiogram can also show whether any chambers of the heart, called the atria or ventricles, are enlarged.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Echocardiogram</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HC_Echocardiogram_Img_MEDIMG-PHO_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Two-dimensional echocardiography (2D echo), a type of ultrasound, can identify and define the congenital heart defect and will also determine the effect it is having on heart function. Some defects will have only a moderate impact on blood circulation while others may have a more severe impact. Information from the 2D echo will help guide the doctors on the course of action. Sometimes, especially in the case of extremely premature babies with low birth weights, several 2D echocardiograms will be required for a complete assessment.</p><p>Doctors will also want to determine if other conditions are having an influence on the effect of the heart defect. For example, it may be possible that a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a blood vessel that diverted oxygen away from the inactive lungs during pregnancy that has abnormally remained open following birth, is negatively affecting blood flow in addition to the heart defect. If this is the case, as the PDA closes, the need for intervention or the course of action in terms of the defect may change.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Diagnostic Catheterization</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Catheter_diagnostic_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A thin flexible tube is passed into the heart and its surrounding blood vessels to gather information on how the heart is functioning.</figcaption> </figure> <p>One course of action may be an additional diagnostic test: cardiac catheterization, which will provide even more detailed information on the structure and function of the heart. This may not be possible in extremely premature babies. This procedure is invasive: a tiny catheter is inserted into a vein, usually beginning in the leg, and threaded to the heart. A radiopaque dye is injected through the catheter and X-rays are taken to provide a detailed look at what is going on in the heart. The pressures in various parts of the heart can be measured and blood samples can be taken to measure oxygen levels. Cardiac catherization will allow doctors to plan a strategy to deal with the defect.</p><h4>More information</h4><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1767&language=English">Congenital Heart Defects </a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1840&language=English">Drug Treatment of Congenital Heart Defects</a> </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1841&language=English">Surgical Treatment of Congenital Heart Defects</a> </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Catheter_diagnostic_MED_ILL_EN.jpgDiagnosis of congenital heart defects in premature babies

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