Ongoing care for premature babiesOOngoing care for premature babiesOngoing care for premature babiesEnglishNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANAHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000048.0000000000000991.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about ongoing care options for your premature baby. Premature babies may have both short and long-term effects from their experience. </p><p>Premature babies, especially those who were born very early or who had complications in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), may have both short-term and long-term effects from their experience. The range and severity of these effects is large, from nearly undetectable to severely debilitating. As these babies prepare to leave the NICU, parents gradually become more responsible for their complete care so that transition to home or a less intensive care environment is easier.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The chances that a baby will have ongoing medical and developmental concerns are usually related to how premature the baby was at birth and the complications which occurred.</li> <li>For developmental benchmark purposes your baby will have two ages: their actual, chronological age, and their corrected age.</li> <li>Health-care professionals can help parents understand what is normal development and behaviour for their growing baby.</li> <li>Parents should observe and record their child's behaviour, as well as learn basic lifesaving skills such as CPR and first aid.</li></ul>
Soins continus pour les bébés prématurésSSoins continus pour les bébés prématurésOngoing care for premature babiesFrenchNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANAHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000048.0000000000000991.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez au sujet des options de soins continus pour votre bébé prématuré. Les bébés prématurés peuvent des séquelles à court terme et à long terme suivant leur expérience.</p><p>Les bébés prématurés, surtout ceux qui sont nés très tôt ou qui ont connu des complications à l’unité néonatale des soins intensifs (UNSI), peuvent avoir des séquelles à court terme et à long terme suivant leur expérience. L’étendue et la gravité de ces séquelles peuvent être grandes, de pratiquement indétectables à gravement débilitantes. Alors que ces bébés s’apprêtent à quitter l’UNSI, les parents deviennent graduellement plus responsables des soins complets de façon à ce que la transition vers la maison ou vers un environnement avec des soins moins intensifs soit facilitée.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les probabilités qu’un bébé subisse des difficultés médicales ou développementales sont souvent reliées au degré de prématurité du bébé à la naissance et aux complications qui se sont produites.</li> <li>Pour pouvoir évaluer son développement, vous devrez penser à l’âge de votre bébé de deux façons différentes : l’âge réel, ou chronologique, de votre bébé et son âge corrigé.</li> <li>Les professionnels en soins de santé peuvent aider les parents à comprendre ce qui correspond à un développement et un comportement normal chez leur bébé qui grandit.</li> <li>Les parents doivent observer et noter le comportement de leur enfant en plus d’apprendre des habiletés d’urgence de base comme la réanimation cardiorespiratoire (RCR) et les premiers soins.</li></ul>

 

 

Ongoing care for premature babies1908.00000000000Ongoing care for premature babiesOngoing care for premature babiesOEnglishNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANAHealthy living and preventionPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000048.0000000000000991.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about ongoing care options for your premature baby. Premature babies may have both short and long-term effects from their experience. </p><p>Premature babies, especially those who were born very early or who had complications in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), may have both short-term and long-term effects from their experience. The range and severity of these effects is large, from nearly undetectable to severely debilitating. As these babies prepare to leave the NICU, parents gradually become more responsible for their complete care so that transition to home or a less intensive care environment is easier.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The chances that a baby will have ongoing medical and developmental concerns are usually related to how premature the baby was at birth and the complications which occurred.</li> <li>For developmental benchmark purposes your baby will have two ages: their actual, chronological age, and their corrected age.</li> <li>Health-care professionals can help parents understand what is normal development and behaviour for their growing baby.</li> <li>Parents should observe and record their child's behaviour, as well as learn basic lifesaving skills such as CPR and first aid.</li></ul><h2>A premature baby’s two ages</h2><p>For the purposes of developmental benchmarks and the follow-up process, you will need to start thinking about your baby’s age in two ways: </p><ul><li>the baby’s actual or chronological age, which is the age measured from the day the baby was actually born </li><li>the baby’s corrected age, which is the age measured from the day the baby was expected to be born </li></ul><p>Suppose a baby was born two months premature. If that baby’s actual age is now six months, their corrected age is four months.</p><p>This can make a big difference in terms of how you and health care providers think of your baby’s progress. For example, most full-term babies can sit up when they are about seven months old. However, if your baby was born three months early, although their actual age is seven months, their corrected age is only four months. This child will have to wait a few more months before they can sit up on their own. </p><p>Though the corrected age is used as benchmark for a baby’s behaviour and development, the actual age is used for vaccinations. This distinction between the actual and corrected age is very important because all assessments of development must be based on the biological age of the brain. </p><h2>What is normal for a baby?</h2><p>Part of the anxiety of returning home with a premature baby, is wondering whether some event or behaviour is “normal.” For example, all babies spit up and vomit to some degree during or immediately following feedings. If a premature baby who had gastrointestinal issues in the NICU goes home and vomits after a feeding, how do you know whether this is a concern or whether this is just normal? Do you take the child to the hospital or let the event pass? </p><p>It is not always easy to determine what behaviour is normal for a baby and what is a concern. Even for full-term babies without any medical issues, the range of what is normal in terms of child behaviour and development is vast. For example, it is not all that unusual for a child to begin walking as early as nine months. It is also not all that unusual for a child to begin walking at 15 months. Both these dates are considered within the normal range. Parents of premature children, especially those who were born extremely premature or who had some sort of complication in the NICU, may have an even more difficult time knowing when to be concerned about their baby’s behaviour. </p><p>Thankfully, parents can learn and get to know their baby’s individual behaviour and can get help from professionals. The staff in the follow-up programs, as well as your primary care paediatrician, will be very helpful in this regard. </p><p>In addition to learning as much as you can about typical full-term and premature baby development, parents can help by observing and recording their child’s behaviour. That way, when attending follow-up clinic visits and visits to the paediatrician, they can more fully explain in detail what the child is up to. With this new information combined with the baby’s history, health care providers and parents will be in a better position to assess whether a baby’s development and behaviour are normal or a cause for concern. </p><h2>Other skills worth learning</h2><p>It is recommended that parents, especially those of premature babies who are deemed at risk for future complications, learn some specific skills. If medication is prescribed, parents should know exactly how and when to administer it at home. If medical equipment, such as supplemental oxygen, is to be used at home, parents will need to know how to use this equipment. Infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, or CPR training, is recommended for all parents, especially if their baby is at risk for complications. It should also be noted that severe cardiac events in babies and young children, such as a cardiac arrest, are preceded by breathing troubles. </p><h2>Protecting and overprotecting your premature baby</h2><p>All parents want to protect their babies and children from injury. At the same time, all parents want their babies to thrive and do well. For parents, these two goals can often seem at odds with each other. Children fall down many times before they get steady on their feet. Developing to full potential involves some degree of risk. </p><p>For parents of premature babies, especially those who were born extremely premature or who endured complications in the NICU, the urge to unnecessarily overprotect their baby may be strong. This urge often exists in parents of normal, healthy full-term babies too. Also, knowing what is not risky for a baby will help parents find the right medium between bringing up baby in a safe “bubble,” which is not particularly good for development, and putting their child at undue risk by over stimulating them. </p><p>The trick is to treat your baby, as much as you can, like a normal baby within specific confines recommended by the involved health care professionals. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ongoing_care_for_premature_babies.jpgOngoing care for premature babies

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