Nutrition before and during pregnancyNNutrition before and during pregnancyNutrition before and during pregnancyEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-12-22T05:00:00ZStacey Segal, BScA, MSc, RD;Daina Kalnins, MSc, RD​​10.000000000000052.00000000000002022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to get the right nutrients to support you and your baby before and during pregnancy.</p><p>Eating a balanced diet, before becoming pregnant and during pregnancy, can help you make sure that you receive the right nutrients to support a healthy pregnancy. Healthy eating can also help to reduce your risk of developing conditions that can affect pregnancy, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.</p><p>The time when you begin planning a pregnancy is a great opportunity to think about how you can maximize your health through wise food choices and regular exercise. It is also a good time to start a multivitamin supplement. Speak to your health-care provider about choosing the right prenatal multivitamin supplement for you.</p><p>It is important to eat nutritious food <strong>before</strong> you become pregnant because good nutrition supports your baby during the first trimester (three months) as their lungs, heart, brain and other important organs start to develop.</p><p>Learning about good nutrition will benefit you and your baby through your pregnancy and have long-term benefits for your child as they grow.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Good nutrition is important for gaining the recommended amount of pregnancy weight, supporting fetal development and reducing the risk of complications during pregnancy and birth.</li> <li>Eat a variety of foods from the four food groups, adding more servings from each of these food groups if pregnant with multiples.</li> <li>Important nutrients in pregnancy include folic acid, calcium, iron, protein, iodine, vitamin C, vitamin B12 and vitamin D.</li> <li>Make sure you are taking in enough folic acid from folate-rich foods and a prenatal multivitamin with folic acid from before (or as soon as you suspect) you are pregnant until four to six weeks after giving birth or as long as breastfeeding continues.</li> <li>If eating fish, choose varieties with low levels of methyl mercury, such as sole, haddock, salmon and trout.</li> </ul><h2>General healthy eating recommendations for women of childbearing age</h2> <p>Consuming a healthy diet involves choosing a variety of items from the four food groups listed in <a href="/Article?contentid=1436&language=English">Canada’s Food Guide</a>.</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1437&language=English">Vegetables and fruit</a>: Choose seven to eight servings a day, making sure to include dark green and orange vegetables and orange fruit.</li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1438&language=English">Grain products</a>: Choose six to seven servings a day, including whole grain and enriched products.</li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1439&language=English">Milk products and alternatives</a>: Choose four servings a day and include lower-fat products.</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1440&language=English">Meat and alternatives</a>: Choose two to three servings a day of lean meat, poultry or fish or alternatives such as peas, tofu, beans and lentils.</li> </ul> <p>To make sure that both you and your baby get enough nutrition, Health Canada recommends adding an <strong>extra two to three servings of food a day</strong> during your second and third trimester, and while breastfeeding.</p> <p>If you are pregnant with twins or other multiples, you will need even more calories and nutrients to help them develop their bones, brain and organs. Health Canada recommends adding an extra two to three servings for <strong>each</strong> baby during the second and third trimester.</p> <h3>Fluids</h3> <p>You may find that you are very thirsty during pregnancy. This is partly because of the increase in blood volume. Drinking plenty of fluids will help you quench your thirst and help with constipation and swelling.</p><h2>Key nutrients for pregnancy</h2> <h3>Calcium</h3> <p>Your developing baby will need <a href="/Article?contentid=1448&language=English">calcium</a> to grow strong bones and teeth, a healthy heart, nerves and muscles.</p> <p>To help you get enough calcium from your diet, choose at least four servings a day from the milk and alternatives food group. Use milk in puddings, soups, pancakes and casseroles. If you are lactose intolerant, try lactose-reduced milk. You can also get calcium from edamame, tofu, almonds, dark leafy vegetables and tahini. Some women may benefit from calcium supplements in addition to a prenatal multivitamin.</p> <h3>Iron</h3> <p>Both you and your baby will need <a href="/Article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a> during pregnancy. Iron requirements increase throughout pregnancy and peak in the third trimester. If you do not take in enough iron, you could become <a href="/Article?contentid=1450&language=English">anaemic</a>, which could cause complications during pregnancy and childbirth.</p> <p>To increase iron in your diet, choose the recommended servings of meat and meat alternatives as well as whole and enriched grains.</p> <p><strong>Note:</strong> The body can better absorb iron from animal sources, such as beef, than from non-animal sources, such as vegetables or beans. To help your body absorb iron from non-animal sources, eat foods rich in vitamin C at the same time. For example, eat an orange with a lentil dish.</p> <p><strong>Health Canada recommends that pregnant women should take a prenatal multivitamin that has 16-20 mg of iron</strong>. Some women may need an additional low-dose iron supplement.</p> <h3>Folic acid</h3> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1449&language=English">Folic acid</a>, also known as folate, is a B vitamin that protects against neural tube defects (defects that affect the brain and spinal cord), such as spina bifida.</p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=371&language=English">Neural tube defects</a> develop in the first month of pregnancy. For this reason, it is very important to take enough folic acid both <strong>before conceiving and throughout pregnancy</strong>.</p> <ul> <li>Start taking folic acid two to three months before becoming pregnant.</li> <li>Continue it until at least four to six weeks after giving birth, or as long as you are breastfeeding.</li> </ul> <p>If you did not take folic acid before becoming pregnant, start taking it as soon as you suspect you are pregnant.</p> <p>For the <strong>general population</strong>, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) recommends:</p> <ul> <li>a diet high in folate-rich foods</li> <li>a daily multivitamin supplement that contains 0.4 mg to 1 mg folic acid and 2.6ug vitamin B12</li> </ul> <p>You can find folate naturally in broccoli, spinach, peas, Brussels sprouts, corn, lentils and other legumes, oranges and as an ingredient in fortified white wheat flour and enriched grain products such as pasta.</p> <p>Some people have a <strong>higher-than-average risk</strong> of having a baby with a neural tube defect. If your doctor tells you that are at higher risk, the SOGC recommends:</p> <ul> <li>a diet high in folate-rich foods</li> <li>a daily multivitamin supplement that contains 1 mg or 4 mg folic acid, depending on whether you are at moderate or high risk, and 2.6 ug vitamin B12. Take this multivitamin supplement from three months before becoming pregnant until the end of your first trimester. After that, take a multivitamin supplement containing 0.4 mg to 1 mg folic acid.</li> </ul> <p>Health Canada and the SOGC advise women to avoid taking more than one multivitamin supplement a day in an attempt to consume a higher dose of supplemental folic acid. In large doses, some substances in multivitamins could be harmful. This is especially true of vitamin A in retinol form (including retinyl palmitate and retinyl acetate).</p> <p>Speak to your health-care provider about finding the right prenatal multivitamin supplement for you.</p>
Nutrition avant et pendant la grossesseNNutrition avant et pendant la grossesseNutrition before and during pregnancyFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-12-22T05:00:00ZStacey Segal, BScA, MSc, RD;Daina Kalnins, MSc, RD​​10.000000000000052.00000000000002022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez la manière d’absorber les éléments nutritifs nécessaires pour aider au développement de votre bébé et vous accompagner avant et pendant la grossess.</p><p>Avec une alimentation équilibrée, avant de tomber enceinte et pendant la grossesse, vous aurez la certitude de recevoir les éléments nutritifs adéquats pour accompagner une grossesse en pleine santé. Une alimentation saine peut également permettre de réduire le risque de contracter des pathologies qui peuvent affecter la grossesse, par exemple, une tension artérielle élevée, le diabète ou l’obésité.</p><p>Le moment où vous commencez à planifier une grossesse est l’occasion rêvée de réfléchir à la manière d’optimiser votre santé grâce à des choix alimentaires judicieux et à une activité physique régulière. C’est également le bon moment pour commencer à prendre un supplément multivitaminique. Discutez avec votre prestataire de soins du choix du bon supplément multivitaminique prénatal pour vous.</p><p>Il est important de consommer des aliments nutritifs <strong>avant</strong> de tomber enceinte, car une bonne nutrition contribue au développement de votre bébé au cours du premier trimestre (trois mois), lorsque ses poumons, son cœur, son cerveau et d’autres organes importants se développent.</p><p>Votre bébé et vous tirerez de nombreux bienfaits d’une bonne nutrition tout au long de votre grossesse; en outre, une bonne nutrition procurera des avantages à long terme à votre enfant lorsqu’il grandira.</p> <br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une bonne nutrition est importante pour prendre le poids de grossesse recommandé, pour accompagner le développement du fœtus et pour réduire le risque de complications au cours de la grossesse et à la naissance.</li> <li>Consommez des aliments variés issus des quatre groupes d’aliments, en ajoutant plus de portions de chacun de ces groupes en cas de grossesse multiple.</li> <li>Les éléments nutritifs importants au cours de la grossesse comprennent l’acide folique, le calcium, le fer, les protéines, l’iode, la vitamine C, la vitamine B12 et la vitamine D.</li> <li>Assurez-vous de consommer suffisamment d’acide folique provenant d’aliments riches en folate et de prendre une multivitamine prénatale contenant de l’acide folique avant de tomber enceinte (ou dès que vous soupçonnez que vous l’êtes) jusqu’à quatre à six semaines après la naissance ou tant que l’allaitement se poursuit.</li> <li>Si vous mangez du poisson, choisissez des variétés contenant de faibles niveaux de méthylmercure, par exemple de la sole, de l’aiglefin, du saumon ou de la truite.</li> </ul><h2>Recommandations générales pour une alimentation saine à l’intention des femmes en âge de procréer</h2> <p>L’adoption d’un régime alimentaire sain implique de choisir toute une série d’aliments parmi les quatre groupes énumérés dans le <a href="/Article?contentid=1436&language=French"> Guide alimentaire canadien</a>.</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1437&language=French">Légumes et fruits</a>: Choisissez sept ou huit portions par jour, en veillant à inclure des légumes vert foncé et orange et un fruit orange. </li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1438&language=French">Produits céréaliers</a>: Choisissez six ou sept portions par jour, y compris des produits à grains entiers et enrichis.</li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1439&language=French">Lait et substituts</a>: Choisissez quatre portions par jour et incluez des produits à teneur réduite en matières grasses</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1440&language=French">Viande et substituts</a>: Choisissez deux ou trois portions par jour de viande maigre, de volaille, de poisson, ou de substituts comme les pois, le tofu, les haricots et les lentilles.</li> </ul> <p>Pour vous assurer que votre bébé et vous recevez suffisamment d’éléments nutritifs, Santé Canada recommande d’ajouter <strong>deux ou trois portions d’aliments supplémentaires par jour</strong>au cours des deuxième et troisième trimestres et pendant l’allaitement.</p> <p>En cas de grossesse gémellaire ou multiple, vous allez avoir besoin d’un apport plus élevé en calories et en éléments nutritifs pour soutenir la croissance de leurs os, de leur cerveau et de leurs organes. Santé Canada recommande d’ajouter deux ou trois portions supplémentaires pour chaque bébé au cours des deuxième et troisième trimestres.</p> <h3>Liquides</h3> <p>Vous allez peut-être avoir très soif pendant votre grossesse. Cela est dû en partie à l’augmentation du volume sanguin.En buvant beaucoup de liquides, vous pourrez ainsi étancher votre soif et soulager la constipation et les enflures.</p><h2>Principaux éléments nutritifs pour la grossesse</h2> <h3>Calcium</h3> <p>Votre bébé en croissance aura besoin de <a href="/Article?contentid=1448&language=French">calcium</a> pour développer des os et des dents solides et un cœur, des nerfs et des muscles en pleine santé.</p> <p>Pour vous aider à obtenir suffisamment de calcium dans votre alimentation, choisissez au moins quatre portions par jour parmi le groupe du lait et substituts. Utilisez du lait dans les puddings, les soupes, les crêpes et les plats mijotés en cocotte. Si vous êtes intolérante au lactose, essayez le lait à teneur réduite en lactose. Vous pouvez également vous procurer du calcium avec des edamames, du tofu, des amandes, des légumes verts foncé et du tahini. Certaines femmes peuvent bénéficier de suppléments de calcium en plus d’une multivitamine prénatale.</p> <h3>Iron</h3> <p>Aussi bien vous que votre bébé aurez besoin de <a href="/Article?contentid=1450&language=French">fer</a> pendant la grossesse. Les exigences en fer augmentent tout au long de la grossesse et atteignent un sommet au troisième trimestre. Si vous ne prenez pas suffisamment de fer, vous pourriez devenir anémique, ce qui pourrait causer des complications pendant la grossesse et l’accouchement.</p> <p>Pour augmenter le fer dans votre alimentation, choisissez les portions recommandées de viande et de substituts de viande ainsi que des grains entiers et enrichis.</p> <p><strong>Remarque</strong> Le corps peut mieux absorber le fer provenant de sources animales, comme le bœuf, que celui provenant de sources non animales, comme les légumes ou les haricots. Pour aider votre corps à absorber le fer provenant de sources non animales, mangez des aliments riches en vitamine C en même temps. Par exemple, mangez une orange avec un plat de lentilles.</p> <p><strong>Santé Canada recommande que les femmes enceintes prennent une multivitamine prénatale contenant 16 à 20 mg de fer</strong>. Certaines femmes pourraient avoir besoin d’un supplément de fer à faible dose supplémentaire.</p> <h3>Acide folique</h3> <p>L’<a href="/Article?contentid=1449&language=French">acide folique</a>, également connu sous le nom de folate, est une vitamine B qui assure une protection contre les anomalies du tube neural (anomalies qui touchent le cerveau et la moelle épinière), par exemple le spina-bifida.</p> <p>Les <a href="/Article?contentid=371&language=French">anomalies du tube neural</a> apparaissent au cours du premier mois de grossesse. Pour cette raison, il est très important de prendre suffisamment d’acide folique aussi bien <strong>avant la conception que tout au long de la grossesse.</strong>.</p> <ul> <li>Commencez à prendre de l’acide folique deux à trois mois avant de tomber enceinte.</li> <li>Continuez d’en prendre au moins quatre à six semaines après la naissance, ou tant que vous allaitez.</li> </ul> <p>Si vous ne prenez pas d’acide folique avant de tomber enceinte, commencez à en prendre dès que vous soupçonnez que vous êtes enceinte.</p> <p>Pour la <strong>population en général</strong>, la Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada (SOGC) recommande ce qui suit :</p> <ul> <li>alimentation contenant beaucoup d’aliments riches en folates;</li> <li>un supplément multivitaminique quotidien contenant entre 0,4 et 1 mg d’acide folique et 2,6 ug de vitamine B12.</li> </ul> <p>Vous pouvez trouver du folate naturellement dans le brocoli, les épinards, les pois, les choux de Bruxelles, le maïs, les lentilles et autres légumineuses, les oranges; on le retrouve également comme ingrédient dans la farine de blé blanche enrichie et les produits céréaliers enrichis comme les pâtes.</p> <p>Certaines femmes présentent un <strong>risque plus élevé que la moyenne</strong> d’avoir un bébé atteint d’anomalies du tube neural. Si votre médecin vous dit que vous courez un risque plus élevé, la SOGC recommande ce qui suit :</p> <ul> <li>une alimentation contenant beaucoup d’aliments riches en folates;</li> <li>un supplément multivitaminique quotidien contenant entre 1 et 4 mg d’acide folique, selon que vous soyez exposée à un risque modéré ou élevé, et 2,6 ug de vitamine B12. Commencez à prendre ce supplément multivitaminique trois mois avant de tomber enceinte jusqu’à la fin de votre premier trimestre. Après cela, prenez un supplément multivitaminique contenant 0,4 à 1 mg d’acide folique.</li> </ul> <p>Santé Canada et la SOGC conseillent aux femmes d’éviter de prendre plus d’un supplément multivitaminique par jour afin de consommer une dose plus élevée de supplément d’acide folique. À fortes doses, certaines substances dans les multivitamines pourraient être nocives. Cela est particulièrement vrai pour la vitamine A sous sa forme de rétinol (y compris le palmitate et l’acétate de rétinyle).</p> <p>Discutez avec votre prestataire de soins afin de trouver le bon supplément multivitaminique prénatal pour vous.</p>

 

 

Nutrition avant et pendant la grossesse1989.00000000000Nutrition avant et pendant la grossesseNutrition before and during pregnancyNFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-12-22T05:00:00ZStacey Segal, BScA, MSc, RD;Daina Kalnins, MSc, RD​​10.000000000000052.00000000000002022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez la manière d’absorber les éléments nutritifs nécessaires pour aider au développement de votre bébé et vous accompagner avant et pendant la grossess.</p><p>Avec une alimentation équilibrée, avant de tomber enceinte et pendant la grossesse, vous aurez la certitude de recevoir les éléments nutritifs adéquats pour accompagner une grossesse en pleine santé. Une alimentation saine peut également permettre de réduire le risque de contracter des pathologies qui peuvent affecter la grossesse, par exemple, une tension artérielle élevée, le diabète ou l’obésité.</p><p>Le moment où vous commencez à planifier une grossesse est l’occasion rêvée de réfléchir à la manière d’optimiser votre santé grâce à des choix alimentaires judicieux et à une activité physique régulière. C’est également le bon moment pour commencer à prendre un supplément multivitaminique. Discutez avec votre prestataire de soins du choix du bon supplément multivitaminique prénatal pour vous.</p><p>Il est important de consommer des aliments nutritifs <strong>avant</strong> de tomber enceinte, car une bonne nutrition contribue au développement de votre bébé au cours du premier trimestre (trois mois), lorsque ses poumons, son cœur, son cerveau et d’autres organes importants se développent.</p><p>Votre bébé et vous tirerez de nombreux bienfaits d’une bonne nutrition tout au long de votre grossesse; en outre, une bonne nutrition procurera des avantages à long terme à votre enfant lorsqu’il grandira.</p> <br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une bonne nutrition est importante pour prendre le poids de grossesse recommandé, pour accompagner le développement du fœtus et pour réduire le risque de complications au cours de la grossesse et à la naissance.</li> <li>Consommez des aliments variés issus des quatre groupes d’aliments, en ajoutant plus de portions de chacun de ces groupes en cas de grossesse multiple.</li> <li>Les éléments nutritifs importants au cours de la grossesse comprennent l’acide folique, le calcium, le fer, les protéines, l’iode, la vitamine C, la vitamine B12 et la vitamine D.</li> <li>Assurez-vous de consommer suffisamment d’acide folique provenant d’aliments riches en folate et de prendre une multivitamine prénatale contenant de l’acide folique avant de tomber enceinte (ou dès que vous soupçonnez que vous l’êtes) jusqu’à quatre à six semaines après la naissance ou tant que l’allaitement se poursuit.</li> <li>Si vous mangez du poisson, choisissez des variétés contenant de faibles niveaux de méthylmercure, par exemple de la sole, de l’aiglefin, du saumon ou de la truite.</li> </ul><h2>Recommandations générales pour une alimentation saine à l’intention des femmes en âge de procréer</h2> <p>L’adoption d’un régime alimentaire sain implique de choisir toute une série d’aliments parmi les quatre groupes énumérés dans le <a href="/Article?contentid=1436&language=French"> Guide alimentaire canadien</a>.</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1437&language=French">Légumes et fruits</a>: Choisissez sept ou huit portions par jour, en veillant à inclure des légumes vert foncé et orange et un fruit orange. </li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1438&language=French">Produits céréaliers</a>: Choisissez six ou sept portions par jour, y compris des produits à grains entiers et enrichis.</li> <li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1439&language=French">Lait et substituts</a>: Choisissez quatre portions par jour et incluez des produits à teneur réduite en matières grasses</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1440&language=French">Viande et substituts</a>: Choisissez deux ou trois portions par jour de viande maigre, de volaille, de poisson, ou de substituts comme les pois, le tofu, les haricots et les lentilles.</li> </ul> <p>Pour vous assurer que votre bébé et vous recevez suffisamment d’éléments nutritifs, Santé Canada recommande d’ajouter <strong>deux ou trois portions d’aliments supplémentaires par jour</strong>au cours des deuxième et troisième trimestres et pendant l’allaitement.</p> <p>En cas de grossesse gémellaire ou multiple, vous allez avoir besoin d’un apport plus élevé en calories et en éléments nutritifs pour soutenir la croissance de leurs os, de leur cerveau et de leurs organes. Santé Canada recommande d’ajouter deux ou trois portions supplémentaires pour chaque bébé au cours des deuxième et troisième trimestres.</p> <h3>Liquides</h3> <p>Vous allez peut-être avoir très soif pendant votre grossesse. Cela est dû en partie à l’augmentation du volume sanguin.En buvant beaucoup de liquides, vous pourrez ainsi étancher votre soif et soulager la constipation et les enflures.</p><h2>Principaux éléments nutritifs pour la grossesse</h2> <h3>Calcium</h3> <p>Votre bébé en croissance aura besoin de <a href="/Article?contentid=1448&language=French">calcium</a> pour développer des os et des dents solides et un cœur, des nerfs et des muscles en pleine santé.</p> <p>Pour vous aider à obtenir suffisamment de calcium dans votre alimentation, choisissez au moins quatre portions par jour parmi le groupe du lait et substituts. Utilisez du lait dans les puddings, les soupes, les crêpes et les plats mijotés en cocotte. Si vous êtes intolérante au lactose, essayez le lait à teneur réduite en lactose. Vous pouvez également vous procurer du calcium avec des edamames, du tofu, des amandes, des légumes verts foncé et du tahini. Certaines femmes peuvent bénéficier de suppléments de calcium en plus d’une multivitamine prénatale.</p> <h3>Iron</h3> <p>Aussi bien vous que votre bébé aurez besoin de <a href="/Article?contentid=1450&language=French">fer</a> pendant la grossesse. Les exigences en fer augmentent tout au long de la grossesse et atteignent un sommet au troisième trimestre. Si vous ne prenez pas suffisamment de fer, vous pourriez devenir anémique, ce qui pourrait causer des complications pendant la grossesse et l’accouchement.</p> <p>Pour augmenter le fer dans votre alimentation, choisissez les portions recommandées de viande et de substituts de viande ainsi que des grains entiers et enrichis.</p> <p><strong>Remarque</strong> Le corps peut mieux absorber le fer provenant de sources animales, comme le bœuf, que celui provenant de sources non animales, comme les légumes ou les haricots. Pour aider votre corps à absorber le fer provenant de sources non animales, mangez des aliments riches en vitamine C en même temps. Par exemple, mangez une orange avec un plat de lentilles.</p> <p><strong>Santé Canada recommande que les femmes enceintes prennent une multivitamine prénatale contenant 16 à 20 mg de fer</strong>. Certaines femmes pourraient avoir besoin d’un supplément de fer à faible dose supplémentaire.</p> <h3>Acide folique</h3> <p>L’<a href="/Article?contentid=1449&language=French">acide folique</a>, également connu sous le nom de folate, est une vitamine B qui assure une protection contre les anomalies du tube neural (anomalies qui touchent le cerveau et la moelle épinière), par exemple le spina-bifida.</p> <p>Les <a href="/Article?contentid=371&language=French">anomalies du tube neural</a> apparaissent au cours du premier mois de grossesse. Pour cette raison, il est très important de prendre suffisamment d’acide folique aussi bien <strong>avant la conception que tout au long de la grossesse.</strong>.</p> <ul> <li>Commencez à prendre de l’acide folique deux à trois mois avant de tomber enceinte.</li> <li>Continuez d’en prendre au moins quatre à six semaines après la naissance, ou tant que vous allaitez.</li> </ul> <p>Si vous ne prenez pas d’acide folique avant de tomber enceinte, commencez à en prendre dès que vous soupçonnez que vous êtes enceinte.</p> <p>Pour la <strong>population en général</strong>, la Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada (SOGC) recommande ce qui suit :</p> <ul> <li>alimentation contenant beaucoup d’aliments riches en folates;</li> <li>un supplément multivitaminique quotidien contenant entre 0,4 et 1 mg d’acide folique et 2,6 ug de vitamine B12.</li> </ul> <p>Vous pouvez trouver du folate naturellement dans le brocoli, les épinards, les pois, les choux de Bruxelles, le maïs, les lentilles et autres légumineuses, les oranges; on le retrouve également comme ingrédient dans la farine de blé blanche enrichie et les produits céréaliers enrichis comme les pâtes.</p> <p>Certaines femmes présentent un <strong>risque plus élevé que la moyenne</strong> d’avoir un bébé atteint d’anomalies du tube neural. Si votre médecin vous dit que vous courez un risque plus élevé, la SOGC recommande ce qui suit :</p> <ul> <li>une alimentation contenant beaucoup d’aliments riches en folates;</li> <li>un supplément multivitaminique quotidien contenant entre 1 et 4 mg d’acide folique, selon que vous soyez exposée à un risque modéré ou élevé, et 2,6 ug de vitamine B12. Commencez à prendre ce supplément multivitaminique trois mois avant de tomber enceinte jusqu’à la fin de votre premier trimestre. Après cela, prenez un supplément multivitaminique contenant 0,4 à 1 mg d’acide folique.</li> </ul> <p>Santé Canada et la SOGC conseillent aux femmes d’éviter de prendre plus d’un supplément multivitaminique par jour afin de consommer une dose plus élevée de supplément d’acide folique. À fortes doses, certaines substances dans les multivitamines pourraient être nocives. Cela est particulièrement vrai pour la vitamine A sous sa forme de rétinol (y compris le palmitate et l’acétate de rétinyle).</p> <p>Discutez avec votre prestataire de soins afin de trouver le bon supplément multivitaminique prénatal pour vous.</p><h2>Autres éléments nutritifs importants dans la grossesse</h2><ul><li> Protéines: Les <a href="/Article?contentid=1444&language=French">protéines </a> alimentaires sont requises pour aider à la croissance du futur bébé et au développement des tissus placentaires, utérins et mammaires. On trouve des protéines dans la viande, le poisson, les œufs, les produits laitiers et les sources végétales comme le tofu, les haricots et les noix.</li><li>Iode: L’iode est nécessaire pour aider au développement du cerveau et du système nerveux du futur bébé. Le sel iodé est la source d’iode la plus courante.</li><li>Vitamine C: La vitamine C soutient le système immunitaire, joue un rôle dans la croissance et la réparation des tissus, et aide également le corps à absorber le fer provenant de sources végétales. Essayez de manger des aliments riches en vitamine C, par exemple des agrumes, des poivrons rouges ou des tomates, en même temps que des aliments provenant de sources animales riches en fer, comme la viande.</li><li>Vitamine B12: La <a href="/Article?contentid=1446&language=French">vitamine B12 </a> contribue à la santé des globules rouges et au bon fonctionnement des nerfs. Les groupes alimentaires qui sont des sources de vitamine B12 sont le lait et ses substituts et la viande et ses substituts. Si vous ne mangez pas de viande, vous devriez peut-être inclure des aliments fortifiés en vitamine B12 dans votre alimentation.</li><li> Vitamine D: La <a href="/Article?contentid=1447&language=English">vitamine D</a> agit en synergie avec le calcium pour aider à garder des os en bonne santé. Les femmes enceintes devraient prendre 600 UI par jour. Vous pouvez généralement trouver cette quantité dans un supplément multivitaminique prénatal.</li></ul><h2>Poisson et acides gras oméga-3</h2><p>Le poisson est une excellente source de protéine, de vitamine D, de fer, de sélénium, de zinc et d’acides gras oméga-3. Les acides gras oméga-3 sont des matières grasses essentielles (les matières grasses que nous ne pouvons obtenir que grâce à notre alimentation) qui jouent un rôle important dans la croissance et le développement du futur bébé.</p><p>Santé Canada suggère que toutes les femmes en âge de procréer, surtout celles qui sont enceintes ou qui allaitent, fassent tout particulièrement attention aux types de poisson qu’elles mangent. Cela s’explique par le fait que certains poissons contiennent du méthylmercure, un métal qui s’accumule dans la circulation sanguine au fil du temps et qui peut endommager le système nerveux du futur bébé. Bien que le corps élimine le méthylmercure naturellement, cela peut prendre un an avant que les taux chutent à un niveau sans danger.</p><p>Santé Canada recommande de consommer au moins 150 grammes (5 onces) de poisson cuit (faible en mercure) chaque semaine pendant la grossesse. Le tableau ci-dessous énumère les poissons à choisir et les poissons à éviter avant et pendant la grossesse.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Poisson contenant des taux faibles de méthylmercure (consommer 5 onces par semaine)</th><th>Poisson contenant des taux élevés de méthylmercure (consommer moins de 5 onces par semaine)*</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Saumon</td><td>Thon (frais ou congelé)</td></tr><tr><td>Truite</td><td>Requin</td></tr><tr><td>Hareng</td><td>Espadon</td></tr><tr><td>Aiglefin</td><td>Makaire</td></tr><tr><td>Thon léger en conserve</td><td>Hoplostèthe orange</td></tr><tr><td>Goberge</td><td>Escolier</td></tr><tr><td>Sole</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Limande</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Anchois</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Omble</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Merlu</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Rouget</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Éperlan</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Maquereau de l'Atlantique</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Grand corégone<br></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><p>*Ces poissons étant tous des prédateurs (c’est-à-dire qu’ils chassent d’autres poissons), ils ont tendance à accumuler du méthylmercure provenant de leur alimentation ainsi que des eaux environnantes.</p><h2>Caféine</h2><p>Santé Canada recommande de limiter la caféine à 200 à 300 mg par jour. La consommation de cette quantité de caféine n’affectera pas négativement la fertilité ou la grossesse d’une femme, ni le développement d’un bébé. Toutefois, il est important de rester dans cette limite, car il existe très peu de conclusions – et elles sont souvent contradictoires – concernant les effets d’une consommation supérieure à 300 mg de caféine par jour.</p><p>Ce tableau énumère la teneur en caféine habituelle de boissons courantes.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Teneur en caféine</th><th>​Caffeine level</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Tasse de café brassé de 8 onces</td><td>150 mg</td></tr><tr><td>Tasse de thé ordinaire de 8 onces</td><td>35 mg</td></tr><tr><td>Cannette de 12 onces de cola</td><td>30 à 100 mg</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Édulcorants artificiels</h2><p>L’utilisation modérée de certains édulcorants artificiels est sûre pendant la grossesse. Certains autres édulcorants ne sont pas jugés sans danger.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Édulcorants approuvés pendant la grossesse</th><th>Édulcorants dangereux pendant la grossesse</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> Aspartame (NutraSweet®, Equal®) </td><td> Cyclamates (Sweet ‘n’ Low®, Sugar Twin®)</td></tr><tr><td> Acésulfame-potassium (Ace K) </td><td></td></tr><tr><td> Sucralose (Splenda®)</td><td></td></tr><tr><td> Saccharine</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Stévia</td><td></td></tr><tr><td> Alcools de sucre </td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Alcool pendant la grossesse</h2><p>La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada (SOGC) recommande d’éviter complètement l’alcool pendant la grossesse. On ne dispose pas de données probantes suffisantes pour confirmer le degré de nocivité potentielle de l’alcool pour votre bébé, aussi infimes qu’en soient les quantités.</p><h2>Gestion de votre poids pendant la grossesse</h2><p>Au cours de la grossesse, il est important de prendre régulièrement du poids en adoptant un régime alimentaire équilibré. La grossesse n’est pas une période propice à la privation d’aliments, sauf sur avis contraire de votre médecin ou de votre diététicien.</p><p>Le poids que vous devriez prendre est basé sur votre indice de masse corporelle (IMC)* avant de tomber enceinte.</p><p>Santé Canada et l’Institute of Medicine américain recommandent les taux de prise de poids suivants au cours de la grossesse.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Pre-pregnancy BMI</th><th>Second and third trimester weight gain</th><th>Recommended total weight gain</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Poids insuffisant (IMC inférieur à 18,5) </td><td>1 livre (environ un demi-kilo) par semaine</td><td>28 à 40 livres (environ 12 à 18 kilos)</td></tr><tr><td>Poids normal (IMC entre 18,5 et 24,9)</td><td>1 livre (environ un demi-kilo) par semaine</td><td>25 à 35 livres (environ 11 à 16 kilos)</td></tr><tr><td>Surpoids (IMC entre 25 et 29,9)</td><td>0,6 livre (environ 300 g) par semaine</td><td>15 à 25 livres (environ 7 à 11 kilos)</td></tr><tr><td>Obésité (IMC supérieur à 30)</td><td>0,5 livre (environ 250 g) par semaine </td><td>11 à 20 livres (environ 5 à 9 kilos)</td></tr></tbody></table><p>*Votre IMC est le ratio entre votre poids et votre taille. Pour calculer votre IMC, divisez votre poids en kilogrammes (kg) par votre taille en mètres au carré. Par exemple, une femme qui mesure 5 pieds et 6 pouces (1,676 mètres) et pèse 135 livres (61,4 kg) a un IMC de 21,8 --> 61,4 / (1,676 x 1,676) = 21,8.</p><p>Les femmes enceintes qui ont une alimentation équilibrée et nutritive et qui prennent au moins le poids recommandé peuvent réduire le risque de naissance prématurée et de faible poids de naissance pour le bébé. Par contre, une prise de poids excessive peut entraîner un poids élevé du nouveau-né à la naissance, un accouchement plus long, un traumatisme à la naissance ou une <a href="/Article?contentid=406&language=French">césarienne</a>.</p><p>L’<a href="/Article?contentid=313&language=French">exercice</a> peut également soutenir une grossesse sans problème. Selon la SOGC, toutes les femmes devraient faire régulièrement des exercices aérobiques et musculaires dans le cadre d’un style de vie sain pendant leur grossesse, sauf si un motif d’ordre médical les en empêche.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/nutrition_before_and_during_pregnancy.jpgNutrition avant et pendant la grossesse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.