Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeBBehavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeBehavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeEnglishPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-06-20T04:00:00ZAlice Charach, MD, MSc, FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000536.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to manage your child's difficult behaviour.</p><p>A healthy parent-child relationship is the starting point for managing any behavioural difficulties. The main features of a healthy relationship include:</p><ul><li>maintaining a positive nurturing relationship with your child</li><li>providing consistent rules and expectations</li><li>knowing what your child likes to do and with whom they spend their time</li></ul><p>It is important to have these firmly in place before you introduce anything to manage any problematic behaviour.</p> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A healthy parent/child relationship is positive and nurturing, includes consistent rules and expectations and is based on knowing what a child likes to do and with whom they spend their time.</li> <li>If your child shows signs of a possible behavioural disorder, try some behaviour modification strategies. These approaches are intended to change your child’s behaviour over time.</li> <li>Behaviour modification strategies include setting clear and consistent rules, expectations and consequences, explaining your values, understanding your child’s point of view and praising positive behaviour.</li> <li>If your child’s behaviour does not improve, consider seeing your child’s doctor and, if needed, seek support for your own wellbeing.</li> </ul><h2>Further information</h2> <p>For more information on behavioural disorders, please see the following pages:</p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></p>
Les troubles du comportement: aider votre enfant à domicileLLes troubles du comportement: aider votre enfant à domicileBehavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeFrenchPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-06-20T04:00:00ZAlice Charach, MD, MSc, FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000536.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à gérer le comportement difficile de votre enfant.</p><p>La pierre d’assise de toute gestion des troubles du comportement est une relation saine entre les parents et les enfants. Pour ce faire, il faut:</p><ul><li>avoir avec votre enfant une relation positive et aimante;</li><li>adopter des règles et des normes logiques;</li><li>savoir quelles activités votre enfant aime pratiquer et connaître ses fréquentations.</li></ul><p>Il est important de mettre en œuvre ces politiques avant de prendre des mesures concrètes de gestion des troubles du comportement.<br></p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une relation saine entre les parents et les enfants est positive et aimante. Elle comporte des règles et des normes cohérentes, et les parents doivent savoir quelles activités leur enfant aime pratiquer et connaître ses fréquentations.</li> <li>Si votre enfant présente des signes potentiels de troubles du comportement, adoptez des stratégies de modification du comportement, qui sont conçues pour améliorer sa conduite au fil du temps.</li> <li>Ces stratégies comportent les aspects suivants : adopter des règles et des normes qui soient claires et bien faire comprendre les conséquences à l’enfant, lui expliquer vos valeurs, comprendre son point de vue et le louer lorsqu’il le mérite.</li> <li>Si le comportement de votre enfant ne s’améliore pas, vous devriez peut-être consulter son médecin. N’hésitez pas, au besoin, à solliciter le soutien dont vous avez besoin pour vous même.</li></ul><h2>Pour de plus amples renseignements</h2><p>Pour de plus amples renseignements sur les troubles du comportement, veuillez consulter les pages suivantes:</p><p> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1924&language=French">Les troubles du comportement: présentation générale</a></p><p> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1925&language=French">Les troubles du comportement: signes et symptômes</a></p><p><a href="/_layouts/15/Catalog.aspx?Url=https%3A%2F%2Fauthoring%2Eaboutkidshealth%2Eca%2Fakh%2FPages%2FBehavioural%2Ddisorders%2D%2DTreatment%2Dwith%2Dpsychotherapy%2Dand%2Dmedications%2DFrench%2Easpx">Les troubles du comportement: psychothérapie et médicaments</a> </p>

 

 

Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at home2001.00000000000Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeBehavioural disorders: How to help your child at homeBEnglishPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-06-20T04:00:00ZAlice Charach, MD, MSc, FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000536.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to manage your child's difficult behaviour.</p><p>A healthy parent-child relationship is the starting point for managing any behavioural difficulties. The main features of a healthy relationship include:</p><ul><li>maintaining a positive nurturing relationship with your child</li><li>providing consistent rules and expectations</li><li>knowing what your child likes to do and with whom they spend their time</li></ul><p>It is important to have these firmly in place before you introduce anything to manage any problematic behaviour.</p> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A healthy parent/child relationship is positive and nurturing, includes consistent rules and expectations and is based on knowing what a child likes to do and with whom they spend their time.</li> <li>If your child shows signs of a possible behavioural disorder, try some behaviour modification strategies. These approaches are intended to change your child’s behaviour over time.</li> <li>Behaviour modification strategies include setting clear and consistent rules, expectations and consequences, explaining your values, understanding your child’s point of view and praising positive behaviour.</li> <li>If your child’s behaviour does not improve, consider seeing your child’s doctor and, if needed, seek support for your own wellbeing.</li> </ul><h2>What can I do when my child continues to misbehave when I offer support and set clear rules?</h2> <p>If your child continues to display the <a href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">signs of a possible behavioural disorder</a>, you can try a number of behaviour modification strategies to manage the situation.</p> <h3>Be clear about rules and expectations </h3> <p>Explain rules simply and directly so that your child or teen fully understands what is expected of them. This might mean using fewer words to justify your reasoning than you are used to.</p> <h3>Apply rules and expectations consistently</h3> <p>Children and teens are experts in finding inconsistencies. Make sure that the same plan is followed by all caregivers and teachers who have regular contact with your child.</p> <h3>Be clear about the values and expectations that are important to you</h3> <p>Have clear boundaries between behaviour that you can temporarily ignore and behaviour that you will not tolerate. For instance, sometimes it is okay to temporarily overlook poor behaviour if it is not harmful, dangerous or against family values. </p> <h3>Understand your child’s point of view</h3> <p>Often you can resolve challenging issues by carefully listening to your child’s opinions and having a calm conversation with them about some rules and expectations.</p> <h3>Catch your child behaving well</h3> <p>Notice and praise behaviours that you want to encourage. Some children can particularly benefit from a reward system to emphasize success.</p> <h3>Try to avoid power struggles</h3> <p>Instead of having a battle of wills, lay out the consequences for your child's positive or negative choices. For instance, you might warn your child that they cannot see their friend after dinner if they do not finish their homework. </p> <h3>Look after yourself</h3> <p>Dealing with any child can be frustrating and tiring. Make a point of taking breaks and finding support.</p> <h3>See your child’s doctor</h3> <p>If your child’s behaviour does not improve with these strategies at home, consider seeing your child’s doctor for an assessment. The doctor may refer you for specialized treatment such as parent training, or may recommend <a href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">therapy or medications</a> for your child or teen.</p><h2>Further information</h2> <p>For more information on behavioural disorders, please see the following pages:</p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PST_MH_Behavioural_Help.jpgBehavioural disorders: How to help your child at home

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.