Who gets scoliosis?WWho gets scoliosis?Who gets scoliosis?EnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000068.0000000000000370.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about some risk factors that can increase a child's chance of developing a more severe scoliosis curve, including age at the time of diagnosis.</p><p>Most scoliosis occurs at the onset of puberty, around ages 10 to 16 years. This is called adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The word "idiopathic” means <em>of unknown cause</em>. Of children and teens in this age group, 2% to 3% will develop scoliosis. There are equal numbers of males and females with small curves of less than 10 degrees. However, females tend to outnumber males (10 to 1) in curves greater than 30 degrees. Less than 10% of patients diagnosed with scoliosis will require surgery.</p> <p>This website focuses on idiopathic scoliosis that may require surgery.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Most scoliosis is called adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and occurs at the beginning of puberty.</li> <li> The younger a person is when scoliosis is diagnosed, the greater the risk the curve will increase. </li> <li>Double (S-shaped) curves are more likely to increase than single (C-shaped) ones. </li> <li>If teens are diagnosed before they have begun menstrual periods, and if their bones are still growing at time of diagnosis, the greater the risk the curve will increase. </li></ul>
Qui est atteint de scoliose?QQui est atteint de scoliose?Who gets scoliosis?FrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000068.0000000000000370.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez certains facteurs de risques qui peuvent augmenter la probabilité qu’un enfant atteint de scoliose développe une courbure plus prononcée, dont l’âge au moment du diagnostic.</p><p>La plupart des cas de scoliose se présentent au début de la puberté, soit entre l’âge de 10 et 16 ans. C’est que l’on appelle la scoliose idiopathique chez les adolescents (SIA). Le terme « idiopathique » signifie de cause inconnue. Chez les enfants et adolescents de ce groupe d’âge, de 2 à 3 % développeront une scoliose. Dans le cas des petites courbures de moins de 10 degrés, la malformation touche également les garçons et les filles. Cependant, les courbures de plus de 30 degrés ont tendance à davantage affecter les filles que garçons dans une proportion de 10 filles pour un garçon. Moins de 10 % des patients ayant reçu un diagnostic de scoliose auront besoin d’une intervention chirurgicale.</p> <p>Le présent site Web met l’accent sur la scoliose idiopathique qui peut nécessiter une intervention chirurgicale.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> La plupart des cas de scoliose se réfèrent à la scoliose idiopathique chez les adolescents et se présentent au début de la puberté.</li> <li> Plus une personne est jeune au moment du diagnostic de scoliose, plus le risque est grand que la courbure augmentera.</li> <li>Les courbures doubles (en forme de S) sont plus enclines à s’accroître que les courbures simples (en forme de C).</li> <li>Si les adolescentes ont reçu leur diagnostic avant leurs premières menstruations et si leurs os sont encore en croissance, le risque que leur courbure augmente est plus grand. </li></ul>

 

 

Who gets scoliosis?2008.00000000000Who gets scoliosis?Who gets scoliosis?WEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000068.0000000000000370.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about some risk factors that can increase a child's chance of developing a more severe scoliosis curve, including age at the time of diagnosis.</p><p>Most scoliosis occurs at the onset of puberty, around ages 10 to 16 years. This is called adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The word "idiopathic” means <em>of unknown cause</em>. Of children and teens in this age group, 2% to 3% will develop scoliosis. There are equal numbers of males and females with small curves of less than 10 degrees. However, females tend to outnumber males (10 to 1) in curves greater than 30 degrees. Less than 10% of patients diagnosed with scoliosis will require surgery.</p> <p>This website focuses on idiopathic scoliosis that may require surgery.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Most scoliosis is called adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and occurs at the beginning of puberty.</li> <li> The younger a person is when scoliosis is diagnosed, the greater the risk the curve will increase. </li> <li>Double (S-shaped) curves are more likely to increase than single (C-shaped) ones. </li> <li>If teens are diagnosed before they have begun menstrual periods, and if their bones are still growing at time of diagnosis, the greater the risk the curve will increase. </li></ul><h2>Who is at risk for getting a big curve?</h2><p>There are six main factors that can help predict whether your teen’s curve will increase in size. These factors are related to their growth, whether their bones have stopped growing, and the type and size of their curve. </p><ul><li>The younger they are at the time scoliosis is diagnosed, the greater the risk that their curve(s) will increase.</li><li>If they have not started menstrual periods yet, there is a greater risk that their curve(s) will increase.</li><li>If their bones are still growing at the time scoliosis is diagnosed, there is a greater risk that their curve(s) will increase.</li><li>Double (S-shaped) curves are more likely to get bigger than single (C-shaped) curves. This is a general statement as some double curves can be well tolerated as the two curves may "balance each other out”. To see what the different curve patterns look like, go to the next section: What does scoliosis look like.</li><li>The larger your teen’s curve(s) when the scoliosis is diagnosed, the greater the risk that their curve(s) will increase.</li></ul><p>Males with similar curves have about one-tenth the chance that the curve(s) will increase when compared to females.</p><h3>Osteopenia may increase risk too</h3><p>There is new research that looks at decreased bone density, called osteopenia, in the hip bone on the opposite side of the curve. Researchers found that patients with osteopenia in the hip were more at risk for having a bigger curve. This is a new area of research so it is not known whether the curve causes the decreased bone density or whether the decreased bone density can cause the curve to get bigger. </p><p>It is also not known whether calcium intake in the diet can affect scoliosis in any way.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/who_gets_scoliosis.jpgWho gets scoliosis?

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