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Personal care after scoliosis surgeryPPersonal care after scoliosis surgeryPersonal care after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Andrew Howard, MD, MSc, FRCSC;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC76.00000000000006.000000000000001073.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Following scoliosis surgery, teenagers must face some personal care issues. Read about what these are, and suggestions for dealing with them.</p><p> This page explains how your teen's body will adjust immediately following surgery in the hospital.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Most girls get their menstrual period around the time of surgery. This is a normal response to stress. </li> <li> Stitches will close the incision on your teen's back. After about two days, your teen will get a smaller bandage on their back, which will be removed before they go home and replaced with Steri-Strips.</li> <li> Your teen will work up to a full diet before going home.</li> <li> A Foley catheter stays in your teen's bladder for about three to four days after surgery. </li> <li> Your teen will not have a bowel movement for four to five days due to the anaesthesia and pain medication, but will need to have a bowel movement before they can go home. </li> <li> It is important your teen drinks fluids to prevent bladder infections and constipation. </li> <li>Painkillers should be taken in response to back pain rather than abdominal discomfort.</li> <li> Your teen needs to be able to manage pain through oral medication rather than an IV before they can go home.</li> <li>Your teen should try to take deep breaths occaionally and cough to open up and clear airways.</li></ul>
Soins personnels après l’intervention chirurgicale de la scolioseSSoins personnels après l’intervention chirurgicale de la scoliosePersonal care after scoliosis surgeryFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Andrew Howard, MD, MSc, FRCSC;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC76.00000000000006.000000000000001073.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>À la suite d’une intervention chirurgicale de la scoliose, les adolescents doivent faire face à certains problèmes de soins personnels. Apprenez-en plus sur ces problèmes et sur des méthodes pour les gérer.</p><p> La présente page explique comment le corps de votre adolescent s’ajustera immédiatement après l’intervention chirurgicale à l’hôpital.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> La plupart des adolescentes auront leurs menstruations à peu près au moment où les opérations sont prévues. C’est une réaction normale au stress.</li> <li>Des points de suture fermeront l’incision dans le dos de votre adolescent. Après environ deux jours, on apposera un plus petit bandage sur son dos, lequel sera enlevé avant qu’il ne rentre à la maison et soit remplacé par des Steri-Strips.</li> <li>Votre adolescent retrouvera un régime alimentaire normal avant de retourner à la maison.</li> <li> Un tube appelé cathéter Foley demeure installé dans la vessie de votre adolescent pendant les trois à quatre jours qui suivront l’opération.</li> <li>L’anesthésie et les médicaments contre la douleur feront en sorte que votre adolescent pourrait ne pas aller à la selle pendant quatre à cinq jours, mais il faudra qu’il aille à la selle avant de quitter l’hôpital.</li> <li>Il est très important que votre adolescent boive autant de liquides que possible, car cela prévient les infections urinaires et la constipation.</li> <li>Assurez-vous que votre adolescent prenne des médicaments contre la douleur pour la douleur au dos et non pour l’inconfort abdominal.</li> <li>Votre adolescent doit pouvoir gérer sa douleur en prenant les médicaments par la bouche au lieu d’un IV.</li> <li>Votre adolescent devrait, à l’occasion, essayer de prendre des respirations profondes et de tousser pour ouvrir et dégager les voies respiratoires.</li></ul>

 

 

Personal care after scoliosis surgery2033.00000000000Personal care after scoliosis surgeryPersonal care after scoliosis surgeryPEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Andrew Howard, MD, MSc, FRCSC;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC76.00000000000006.000000000000001073.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Following scoliosis surgery, teenagers must face some personal care issues. Read about what these are, and suggestions for dealing with them.</p><p> This page explains how your teen's body will adjust immediately following surgery in the hospital.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Most girls get their menstrual period around the time of surgery. This is a normal response to stress. </li> <li> Stitches will close the incision on your teen's back. After about two days, your teen will get a smaller bandage on their back, which will be removed before they go home and replaced with Steri-Strips.</li> <li> Your teen will work up to a full diet before going home.</li> <li> A Foley catheter stays in your teen's bladder for about three to four days after surgery. </li> <li> Your teen will not have a bowel movement for four to five days due to the anaesthesia and pain medication, but will need to have a bowel movement before they can go home. </li> <li> It is important your teen drinks fluids to prevent bladder infections and constipation. </li> <li>Painkillers should be taken in response to back pain rather than abdominal discomfort.</li> <li> Your teen needs to be able to manage pain through oral medication rather than an IV before they can go home.</li> <li>Your teen should try to take deep breaths occaionally and cough to open up and clear airways.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="Teen girl and mother walking in the hospital hallway" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ScoliosisSurgicalRecovery_EN.jpg" style="margin-left:0px;margin-right:0px;width:231px;" /> </figure> <h3> <a href="#period">Menstrual period </a></h3><h3> <a href="#backdressing">The back dressing</a> </h3><h3> <a href="#diet">Diet</a> </h3><h3> <a href="#bowelandbladder">Bowel and bladder function</a></h3><h3> <a href="#standsitwalk">Standing, sitting, and walking</a></h3><h3> <a href="#paincontrol">Pain control</a></h3><h3> <a href="#breathingexercises">Coughing and deep breathing exercises</a></h3><h2> <a id="period">Menstrual period</a></h2><p>Most girls will get their menstrual period around the time of the surgery. This is a normal response to stress. Many girls worry about having their period while they are in the hospital when they will unable to care for themselves like they usually do. Try to reassure your teen. Their nurses are very familiar with this situation and will do everything they can to make them feel comfortable. The hospital has a supply of pads or they can bring their own if they want to. Your teen won’t be able to use tampons while in the hospital.</p><h2> <a id="backdressing">Back dressing</a></h2><p>The surgeon will use stitches to close up your teen’s incision. If the stitches are internal, meaning under the skin, they don’t need to be removed as they will dissolve on their own. If the stitches are external, they will need to be removed in seven to 10 days.</p><p>Steri-Strips, which look like small pieces of tape, will be placed across the incision to keep it well-aligned for healing. Your teen’s back will be covered by a large bulky dressing that remains in place for approximately two days. The nurse will remove the large dressing and replace it with a much smaller one. This smaller dressing will be removed just before you and your teen leave the hospital to go home.</p><p>The Steri-Strips tend to dry up and peel off by themselves. Sometimes, Steri-Strips will stay stuck to your teen’s back. It helps to take them off after a shower, usually about a week after surgery. Make sure the Steri-Strips get wet, and you can remove them. This is much like removing a wet band-aid.</p><h2> <a id="diet">Diet</a></h2><p>Immediately following surgery, your teen will not be able to drink or eat anything. It will take a while for their stomach and intestines to wake up from the anaesthetic. The first day after surgery, your teen may be allowed to have ice chips or freezies and sips of water.</p><p>Soon your teen’s intestines will start to "wake up.” Your teen will start passing gas and the nurse will hear bowel sounds when listening to their abdomen with a stethoscope. At this point, your teen can have broth, clear juices, or Jell-O.</p><p>It is important to drink plenty of fluids. This will help prevent <a href="/article?contentid=6&language=English">constipation</a> and bladder infections. Your teen will gradually work up to a full diet before going home.</p><h2> <a id="bowelandbladder">Bowel and bladder function</a></h2><p>A tube called a Foley catheter stays in place in your teen’s bladder for about three to four days following surgery. The catheter will drain the urine from your teen’s body so they won’t need to go to the bathroom to urinate. Once the catheter is removed, your teen will be urinating on their own.</p><p>The anaesthesia and pain medication makes the stomach and intestines move very slowly. As a result, your teen may not have a bowel movement for four to five days. Your teen will likely have stomach bloating and pass a lot of gas. This is a normal response. The doctor will want to make sure that your teen’s stomach and intestines are working normally again before going home. This means they will need to have a bowel movement before leaving the hospital. The nurse can give your teen a laxative if needed.</p><p>It is very important that your teen drinks as many fluids as possible. This prevents bladder infections and also helps prevent constipation. Getting out of bed and walking around will also help your teen to pass gas, reduce bloating, and prevent constipation. Make sure your teen takes the pain killers for the back pain and not for the abdominal discomfort. This is because pain killers can make the abdominal bloating worse.</p><h2> <a id="standsitwalk">Standing, sitting, and walking</a></h2><p>Most teens will be sitting up in bed and standing on the first or second day after surgery. This is done gradually as your teen may feel very dizzy and lightheaded the first time sitting up. This is a normal response. It takes a while for the body to adjust from lying down for several days to being upright again.</p><p>Your teen will work up to short walks to the bathroom. Eventually longer distances, such as down the hall, will be tolerated. Most teens who have had scoliosis surgery find they feel better when they get up and move around.</p><h2> <a id="paincontrol">Pain control</a></h2><p>Your teen will be on the pain pump for the first three days following surgery. Usually by day three or four, your teen will switch from the pump to oral medication for pain control. This way, the doctors and nurses can make sure that the pain can be well-controlled before going home. Before going home, your teen needs to be able to manage their pain by taking the medication by mouth instead of through an IV.</p><h2> <a id="breathingexercises">Coughing and deep breathing exercises</a></h2><p>Most people tend not to breathe deeply when they are in pain. However, your teen should occasionally try to take deep breaths and cough to open up and clear the airways. This also helps to keep the lower lobes of their lungs clear of fluid and fully inflated.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ScoliosisSurgicalRecovery_EN.jpgPersonal care after scoliosis surgery

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