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Hepatitis C: Information for teenagersHHepatitis C: Information for teenagersHepatitis C: Information for teenagersEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LiverImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-10-05T04:00:00ZConstance O'Connor, RN(EC), NP;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)9.0000000000000057.00000000000001585.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hepatitis C is a virus that affects the liver. Find out how you can live with the disease as a teenager.</p><h2>What is hepatitis C?</h2><p>Hepatitis C is liver disease caused by a virus.</p><p>The <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1468&language=English">liver</a> is an organ in our abdomen (belly). It helps our bodies remove toxins and waste. It also helps us digest food and stores the energy we get from food. The word "hepatitis" means that there is inflammation of the liver. Inflammation of the liver can affect the liver’s ability to work properly. Hepatitis can be caused by infections (virus, bacteria or parasites), drugs or toxins (including alcohol). There are several types of viruses that can cause hepatitis. One of these viruses is the hepatitis C virus. Over time, hepatitis C may cause irritation and scarring in the liver, making it difficult for your liver to work properly.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Liver</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_liver_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The liver is an organ that is part of our digestive system. It helps us get rid of toxins, digest food, and store energy from food.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C is an infection due to a virus called hepatitis C virus. People can get hepatitis C by contact with blood, including on contaminated needles, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</li> <li>Alcohol and drugs can further damage your liver; you should avoid them.</li> <li>There are medications available that may cure your hepatitis C. Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options.</li> <li>When you are ready to have a baby, talk to your health-care team about your hepatitis C status. </li> </ul><h2>How do people get hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The hepatitis C virus may be spread from person to person by blood contact, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</p> <ul> <li>Many children with hepatitis C were born to mothers who are also infected with the virus. The hepatitis C virus can be passed to the baby either during pregnancy or delivery, although this happens rarely, in only about 5% of pregnancies.</li> <li>Rarely, people can get hepatitis C if they share personal items that may have the blood of someone with hepatitis C on them (such as toothbrushes, nail clippers or razors).</li> <li>It is possible to get the virus from a blood transfusion, from other blood products or from improperly cleaned medical equipment. This almost never happens in Canada.</li> <li>Anyone can get hepatitis C from sharing needles, such as the needles used for body piercing, tattooing, acupuncture or intravenous drug use.</li> <li>Hepatitis C is only rarely transmitted by having sex, except in people who also have the <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=910&language=English">HIV virus or AIDS</a>. Using condoms reduces the risk of sexual transmission of hepatitis C and other infections.</li> </ul> <p>Hepatitis C cannot be spread to other people by hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing or breastfeeding.</p><h2>What tests can tell me how I am doing with hepatitis C?</h2> <p>Several tests can be done to tell us about the hepatitis C virus and how it is affecting your liver. Common helpful tests include:</p> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C viral load: This test tells how much hepatitis C virus is in your blood.</li> <li>Hepatitis C genotype: This blood test shows what subtype (or genotype) of hepatitis C is present. The genotype helps to show how likely it is that the virus will respond to treatment.</li> <li>Blood tests for liver enzymes (ALT and AST): The levels of these enzymes in the blood indicate how much inflammation is occurring in your liver. High levels mean there is more liver inflammation. A lot of inflammation over time can lead to scarring of the liver.</li> <li>Other blood tests can help show if bad scarring has developed in the liver.</li> <li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1290&language=English">Ultrasound scan</a>: An ultrasound scan of the liver can help tell how healthy it is, and may show signs of bad scarring if this is present. Another ultrasound test, such as "Fibroscan", can also check the stiffness of the liver which helps show mild or moderate amounts of scarring.</li> </ul> <h2>What happens if I get scarring in my liver?</h2> <p>Many people live their whole lives with hepatitis C without significant damage to their liver. However, as people age the risk of scarring in the liver increases. Mild scarring in the liver does not usually affect the way the liver works. Severe scarring (cirrhosis) may make it difficult for the liver to work properly. Cirrhosis only rarely happens in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Chronic hepatitis C infection also increases the risk for liver cancer, especially if it has caused bad liver scarring. However, liver cancer is very rare in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Regular medical follow up throughout your life is important. This should allow problems in your liver to be identified and treated early, which may prevent you from becoming sick.</p> <h2>Treatment for hepatitis C</h2> <p>Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options. Everyone is unique and so is their condition. As a result, recommended treatments are different too.</p> <p>Most teens wait until adulthood to receive treatment for hepatitis C, as long as there is no sign that their liver is developing significant damage.</p> <p>Many new medications for hepatitis C treatment have become available for adults in the last couple of years. These medications are taken by mouth for several weeks and cure more than 90% of people infected with the hepatitis C virus. Unfortunately, these new medications are only approved for use in adult.</p> <p>However, other medications are available for teens. Combination therapy with interferon injections and oral anti-viral medications can be used in childhood. It cures between 50% (half) and 80% (about three quarters) of patients, depending on the genotype of the virus.</p>
Hépatite C : renseignements pour les adolescentsHHépatite C : renseignements pour les adolescentsHepatitis C: Information for teenagersFrenchGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LiverImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-10-05T04:00:00ZConstance O'Connor, RN(EC), NP;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)9.00000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​L’hépatite C est un virus qui affecte le foie. Découvrez comment vivre avec cette maladie à l’adolescence.<br></p><h2>Qu’est-ce que l’hépatite C?</h2><p>L’hépatite C est une maladie du foie causée par un virus.</p><p>Le <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1468&language=French">foie</a> est un organe situé dans l’abdomen (le ventre). Il aide l’organisme à se débarrasser des toxines et des déchets. Il nous aide aussi à digérer les aliments et à stocker l’énergie que nous en tirons. Le terme « hépatite » signifie inflammation du foie. Cette inflammation peut avoir un effet sur la capacité du foie à remplir correctement sa fonction. L’hépatite peut être provoquée par une infection (virale, bactérienne ou parasitaire), des médicaments ou des toxines (dont l’alcool). Plusieurs types de virus peuvent causer l’hépatite. Le virus de l’hépatite C est l’un d’eux. Au fil du temps, l’hépatite C peut entraîner une irritation et une fibrose du foie, ce qui nuit au bon fonctionnement de celui-ci.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Le foie</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_liver_fr.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Le foie est un organe qui fait partie du système digestif. Il aide à se débarrasser des toxines et des déchets, à digérer les aliments et à stocker l’énergie que nous en tirons.</figcaption> </figure><ul><li>L’hépatite C est une infection causée par un virus, le virus de l’hépatite C. On peut contracter l’hépatite C par contact avec du sang, y compris le sang présent sur des aiguilles contaminées, et de la mère à l’enfant, pendant la grossesse ou l’accouchement.</li><li>L’alcool et les drogues peuvent aggraver les atteintes au foie. Vous devriez en éviter la consommation.</li><li>Des médicaments pouvant guérir l’hépatite C existent. Parlez à votre fournisseur de soins de santé pour connaître vos options de traitement.</li><li>Si vous vous apprêtez à avoir un bébé, parlez de votre hépatite C à l’équipe qui vous fournit des soins de santé.</li></ul><br><h2>Comment attrape-t-on l’hépatite C?</h2><p>Le virus de l’hépatite C peut se transmettre d’une personne à l’autre par contact avec du sang, et de la mère à l’enfant, pendant la grossesse ou l’accouchement.</p><ul><li>La plupart des enfants qui ont l’hépatite C sont nés d’une mère elle aussi infectée. Le virus se transmet au bébé pendant la grossesse ou à l’accouchement, bien que cela n’arrive que rarement (environ 5 % des cas de femmes enceintes atteintes du virus).</li><li>Dans de rares cas, l’hépatite C peut se contracter après avoir utilisé des objets personnels portant des traces du sang d’une personne atteinte (par exemple une brosse à dents, un coupe-ongle ou un rasoir).</li><li>Il est possible d’attraper le virus à la suite d’une transfusion de sang, par l’intermédiaire d’autres produits sanguins ou par du matériel médical mal nettoyé. Cela n’arrive presque jamais au Canada.</li><li>N’importe qui peut attraper l’hépatite C à la suite de la réutilisation d’une aiguille contaminée, par exemple dans le cadre d’une séance de perçage corporel, de tatouage ou d’acupuncture, ou en cas d’injection de drogue par voie intraveineuse.</li><li>Il est rare de contracter l’hépatite C en ayant des contacts sexuels, sauf dans le cas de personnes atteintes du <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=910&language=French">VIH ou du SIDA</a>. L’utilisation de préservatifs réduit le risque de transmission sexuelle de l’hépatite C et d’autres infections.</li></ul><p>L’hépatite C ne se transmet pas par les accolades, les baisers, les éternuements, la toux, ni l’allaitement.<br></p><h2>Quelles analyses peuvent déterminer comment mon corps gère l’infection au virus de l’hépatite C?</h2><p>Plusieurs analyses peuvent être effectuées pour contrôler l’évolution du virus de l’hépatite C et la façon dont il affecte votre foie. Ces analyses comprennent :</p><ul><li>La charge virale de l’hépatite C : Cette analyse indique la proportion de virus de l’hépatite C présent dans votre sang.</li><li>Le génotype de l’hépatite C : Cette analyse permet de déterminer quel sous-type (ou génotype) de l’hépatite C est présent dans le sang. Identifier le génotype permet de prévoir la probable évolution du virus et sa réponse au traitement.</li><li>Les analyses de sang ALAT et ASAT (enzymes hépatiques): les niveaux de ces enzymes dans le sang indiquent le degré d’inflammation de votre foie. Des niveaux élevés signifient que l’inflammation du foie est plus importante. Une inflammation importante peut, au fil du temps, conduire à des lésions au foie.</li><li>D’autres analyses de sang peuvent aider à révéler si une mauvaise cicatrisation (fibrose) s’est développée dans le foie.</li><li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1290&language=French">L’échographie</a> : Une échographie du foie peut aider à en déterminer l’état de santé et permettre de repérer les signes d’une mauvaise fibrose, le cas échéant. Une échographie, comme le FibroScan®, peut également contrôler la rigidité du foie, ce qui permet de révéler si le degré de fibrose est modéré ou léger.</li></ul><h2>Que se passe-t-il en cas de fibrose hépatique?</h2><p>Beaucoup de gens gardent l’hépatite C toute leur vie sans jamais subir de dommage important au foie.</p><p>Cependant, le risque de fibrose hépatique augmente avec l’âge. En général, une fibrose légère du foie est sans effet sur la fonction hépatique. Une fibrose aiguë (cirrhose) peut nuire au bon fonctionnement du foie. La cirrhose est rare chez les enfants et les adolescents qui ont l’hépatite C.</p><p>L’infection chronique par le virus de l’hépatite C augmente également le risque de cancer du foie, surtout si elle a entraîné une fibrose hépatique avancée. Cependant, le cancer du foie est très rare chez les enfants et les adolescents qui ont l’hépatite C. Un suivi médical régulier est important tout au long de la vie. Ainsi, les problèmes hépatiques seront détectés et traités à un stade précoce, ce qui pourrait prévenir la maladie.</p><h2>Traitement de l’hépatite C</h2><p>Consultez votre fournisseur de soins de santé pour savoir quelles options de traitement vous sont disponibles. Chaque patient est unique et il en est de même de l’état médical de chacun. En conséquence, les traitements préconisés diffèrent également.</p><p>La plupart des adolescents attendent jusqu’à l’âge adulte avant de recevoir un traitement pour l’hépatite C, à moins que des signes de dommages importants du foie n’apparaissent.</p><p>De nombreux nouveaux médicaments pour le traitement de l’hépatite C sont devenus disponibles aux adultes au cours des dernières années. Ces médicaments sont pris par voie orale pendant plusieurs semaines et guérissent plus de 90 % des personnes infectées par le virus de l’hépatite C. Malheureusement, ils ne sont approuvés que pour une utilisation chez les adultes.</p><p>Cependant, d’autres médicaments sont disponibles pour les adolescents. La thérapie qui combine des injections d’interféron et des médicaments antiviraux administrés par voie orale peut être offerte durant l’enfance. Elle permet de guérir entre 50 % (la moitié) et 80 % (environ les trois quarts) des patients, en fonction du génotype du virus.</p>

 

 

Hepatitis C: Information for teenagers2308.00000000000Hepatitis C: Information for teenagersHepatitis C: Information for teenagersHEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LiverImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-10-05T04:00:00ZConstance O'Connor, RN(EC), NP;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)9.0000000000000057.00000000000001585.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hepatitis C is a virus that affects the liver. Find out how you can live with the disease as a teenager.</p><h2>What is hepatitis C?</h2><p>Hepatitis C is liver disease caused by a virus.</p><p>The <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1468&language=English">liver</a> is an organ in our abdomen (belly). It helps our bodies remove toxins and waste. It also helps us digest food and stores the energy we get from food. The word "hepatitis" means that there is inflammation of the liver. Inflammation of the liver can affect the liver’s ability to work properly. Hepatitis can be caused by infections (virus, bacteria or parasites), drugs or toxins (including alcohol). There are several types of viruses that can cause hepatitis. One of these viruses is the hepatitis C virus. Over time, hepatitis C may cause irritation and scarring in the liver, making it difficult for your liver to work properly.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Liver</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_liver_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The liver is an organ that is part of our digestive system. It helps us get rid of toxins, digest food, and store energy from food.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C is an infection due to a virus called hepatitis C virus. People can get hepatitis C by contact with blood, including on contaminated needles, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</li> <li>Alcohol and drugs can further damage your liver; you should avoid them.</li> <li>There are medications available that may cure your hepatitis C. Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options.</li> <li>When you are ready to have a baby, talk to your health-care team about your hepatitis C status. </li> </ul><h2>How do people get hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The hepatitis C virus may be spread from person to person by blood contact, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</p> <ul> <li>Many children with hepatitis C were born to mothers who are also infected with the virus. The hepatitis C virus can be passed to the baby either during pregnancy or delivery, although this happens rarely, in only about 5% of pregnancies.</li> <li>Rarely, people can get hepatitis C if they share personal items that may have the blood of someone with hepatitis C on them (such as toothbrushes, nail clippers or razors).</li> <li>It is possible to get the virus from a blood transfusion, from other blood products or from improperly cleaned medical equipment. This almost never happens in Canada.</li> <li>Anyone can get hepatitis C from sharing needles, such as the needles used for body piercing, tattooing, acupuncture or intravenous drug use.</li> <li>Hepatitis C is only rarely transmitted by having sex, except in people who also have the <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=910&language=English">HIV virus or AIDS</a>. Using condoms reduces the risk of sexual transmission of hepatitis C and other infections.</li> </ul> <p>Hepatitis C cannot be spread to other people by hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing or breastfeeding.</p><h2>How can I protect others from hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The risk of spreading hepatitis C infection is very low in regular day-to-day activity. If you have hepatitis C, you should not share your toothbrush or other personal items that may have traces of blood on them (razors and nail clippers). You should not let other people touch your blood, and you should not touch the blood of others.</p><h2>What tests can tell me how I am doing with hepatitis C?</h2> <p>Several tests can be done to tell us about the hepatitis C virus and how it is affecting your liver. Common helpful tests include:</p> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C viral load: This test tells how much hepatitis C virus is in your blood.</li> <li>Hepatitis C genotype: This blood test shows what subtype (or genotype) of hepatitis C is present. The genotype helps to show how likely it is that the virus will respond to treatment.</li> <li>Blood tests for liver enzymes (ALT and AST): The levels of these enzymes in the blood indicate how much inflammation is occurring in your liver. High levels mean there is more liver inflammation. A lot of inflammation over time can lead to scarring of the liver.</li> <li>Other blood tests can help show if bad scarring has developed in the liver.</li> <li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1290&language=English">Ultrasound scan</a>: An ultrasound scan of the liver can help tell how healthy it is, and may show signs of bad scarring if this is present. Another ultrasound test, such as "Fibroscan", can also check the stiffness of the liver which helps show mild or moderate amounts of scarring.</li> </ul> <h2>What happens if I get scarring in my liver?</h2> <p>Many people live their whole lives with hepatitis C without significant damage to their liver. However, as people age the risk of scarring in the liver increases. Mild scarring in the liver does not usually affect the way the liver works. Severe scarring (cirrhosis) may make it difficult for the liver to work properly. Cirrhosis only rarely happens in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Chronic hepatitis C infection also increases the risk for liver cancer, especially if it has caused bad liver scarring. However, liver cancer is very rare in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Regular medical follow up throughout your life is important. This should allow problems in your liver to be identified and treated early, which may prevent you from becoming sick.</p> <h2>Treatment for hepatitis C</h2> <p>Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options. Everyone is unique and so is their condition. As a result, recommended treatments are different too.</p> <p>Most teens wait until adulthood to receive treatment for hepatitis C, as long as there is no sign that their liver is developing significant damage.</p> <p>Many new medications for hepatitis C treatment have become available for adults in the last couple of years. These medications are taken by mouth for several weeks and cure more than 90% of people infected with the hepatitis C virus. Unfortunately, these new medications are only approved for use in adult.</p> <p>However, other medications are available for teens. Combination therapy with interferon injections and oral anti-viral medications can be used in childhood. It cures between 50% (half) and 80% (about three quarters) of patients, depending on the genotype of the virus.</p><h2>Will my hepatitis C infection disappear?</h2> <p>Many people that get hepatitis C infection manage to get rid of the virus within a few months and become well again. For most people, however, the hepatitis C infection does not go away. If it lasts for more than six months, it is called chronic hepatitis C. When you have chronic hepatitis C, it is most likely you will keep the infection throughout your life unless you receive treatment for the virus.</p> <p>There are medications that can cure hepatitis C in some people, but some of these medicines are only available for adults. You should discuss your treatment options with your health-care provider. While you may receive treatment for hepatitis C at some point in your lifetime, you may have to wait until you are an adult.</p> <h2>Can people tell I have hepatitis C?</h2> <p>Most young people with hepatitis C look completely well and have no symptoms or signs that they have the virus. Most people with hepatitis C usually feel well and participate in school, work and other activities.</p> <h2>How can I keep my liver healthy?</h2> <p>There are many things that help your liver stay healthy.</p> <ul> <li>A healthy diet with plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit helps provide antioxidants that protect the liver from the bad effects of inflammation.</li> <li>Regular physical activity when combined with a healthy diet keeps weight under control. Being overweight will often cause extra difficulty for the liver and may cause liver scarring to develop more quickly.</li> <li>Be careful with herbal, natural or other alternative or complementary treatments. Check with your doctor before taking any herbal medications, as some of these may harm the liver. </li> <li>Be careful about other medications because some medications are processed by the liver. If you need medication for other health conditions, follow the instructions carefully or ask your health-care provider or pharmacist for advice. </li> <li>Get immunized. You should have all of the recommended immunizations available and be immunized against <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=819&language=English">hepatitis A</a> and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=827&language=English">B</a>.</li> <li>Avoid alcohol and other types of drugs that may damage the liver.</li> </ul> <h2>Does drinking alcohol or taking drugs hurt my liver?</h2> <p>Drinking alcohol often or drinking alcohol in large amounts can cause irritation in your liver and may lead to scarring over time. When you have hepatitis C, this scarring may happen sooner and be worse than in a person who does not have hepatitis C. It is unknown how much alcohol you can drink safely before it starts to damage your liver. The best thing to do is to either drink no alcohol or drink as little as possible.</p> <p>Taking street drugs, even marijuana, may also damage your liver or other organs. Some drugs may cause severe liver damage the first time you try them. Avoid street drugs if you do not want to further damage your liver.</p> <h2>Who do I have to tell about my hepatitis C status?</h2> <p>People who should know about your hepatitis C are your health-care providers, such as your doctors, nurses and dentist. Not everyone needs to know about hepatitis C. It is up to you who you tell about your hepatitis C infection. Friends, family and teachers do not have to be told unless you feel comfortable doing so.</p> <p>Some university courses and jobs, like medical school and being a doctor or dentist, require you to share information about your hepatitis C status with them. If you are unsure about the need to tell someone about your hepatitis C infection, discuss this with your parents, caregiver and your healthcare provider.</p><h2>If I ever have children, will they have hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The risk of a mom passing hepatitis C on to her baby is quite low, approximately 5%. If you are a father-to-be, your baby will not be at risk for hepatitis C before they are born, unless the mother is also infected.</p>Hepatitis C: Information for teenagers

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