Joint and tendon steroid injections using image guidanceJJoint and tendon steroid injections using image guidanceJoint and tendon steroid injections using image guidanceEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Wrist;Shoulder;Elbow;Knee;Ankle;HipSkeletal systemTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-03-31T04:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD9.0000000000000060.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Joint and tendon steroid injections are a form of treatment for children with arthritis and inflammation. Learn more about the procedure here.</p><h2>What are joint and tendon steroid injections?</h2><p>Joint and tendon injections are a form of treatment for children with <a href="/Article?contentid=2493&language=English">arthritis</a> or inflammation. Medications, usually a steroid called triamcinolone, are injected into the affected joints or tendons to relieve pain and swelling.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Joint injection of the </span> <span class="asset-image-title"> </span><span class="asset-image-title">knee</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_steroid_injection_knee_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> a joint injection, medication is injected into an area of the joint call the synovial space. The synovial space is filled with a liquid called synovial fluid.</figcaption> </figure> <p>This treatment is sometimes done using image guidance (using ultrasound or X-ray) to guide a needle into the joint space or tendon sheath, so that the medication can be injected into the right place. The tendon sheath is the layer of membrane around the tendon.</p><p>Image guidance is used when the affected joints and tendons are deep inside the body or in difficult to see places. When these injections are done using image guidance they are done by an interventional radiologist.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Joint and tendon injections help treat arthritis or inflammation of the joints.</li> <li>Children are given a general anesthetic for the procedure.</li> <li>Joint and tendon injections are usually considered a low-risk procedure.</li> <li>Your child needs to rest the injected area for 48 hours (two days) after the procedure.</li> </ul><h2>On the day of the joint and tendon injections</h2> <p>Arrive at the hospital two hours before the planned time of your child’s procedure. Once you get there, your child will be dressed in a hospital gown, weighed and assessed by a nurse. You will also be able to speak to the interventional radiologist who will be doing the steroid injections and the anaesthetist or nurse who will be giving your child medication to make them comfortable during the procedure.</p> <p>Your child will also be reassessed by a doctor from rheumatology to see if any more joints or tendons need to be treated.</p> <p>During the joint and tendon injections you will be asked to wait in the waiting room.</p> <h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2> <p>Children are given medicine for treatments that may be frightening, uncomfortable or painful. Most children will have <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> for joint and tendon injections. The type of medicine that your child will have for the procedure will depend on your child’s condition. </p> <h2>How are these injections done?</h2> <p>The interventional radiologist uses an ultrasound or X-ray to locate the joint space or tendon sheath. Once the site is located, the interventional radiologist uses the image as a guide to put a thin needle into the joint space or tendon sheath.</p> <p>Through this needle the interventional radiologist will inject the steroid and some <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/Pain/Treatment/PainMedicines/Pages/Local-Anaesthetics.aspx">local anaesthetic.</a></p> <p>The procedure may take anywhere from 45 minutes to two hours, depending on how many sites need to be injected.</p><h2>After the joint and tendon injections</h2> <p>Once the joint and tendon injections are complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p> <p>Your child may experience some mild discomfort at the treatment sites. If this happens, your child will be given pain medicine. </p> <h2>Going home</h2> <p>Most children who have joint and tendon injections go home the same day. This is usually two hours after the procedure.</p> <p>For more details on how to care for your child after joint and tendon injections, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1237&language=English">Joint and tendon injections: Caring for your child at home after the procedure</a>.</p><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, the potential benefits as well as the potential risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks. They will help you weigh the potential benefit of the procedure against any risk it may pose for your child. It is important that you understand all of the risks and potential benefits of the joint and tendon injections and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure. </p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive. </p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of their procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the steroid joint injections, let your doctor know. Your child’s procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink and medicines before the procedure</h2><ul><li>Your child’s stomach must be empty during and after sedation or general anaesthetic. </li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure. </li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure. If your child is taking any of these medicines, please discuss this with your doctor and the interventional radiologist. </li></ul><br><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>At SickKids, the interventional radiologists work in the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html" target="_blank">Department of Image Guided Therapy (IGT)</a>. You can call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-6054 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours (8:00 to 15:00) or leave a message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p> <p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html" target="_blank">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p> <p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html" target="_blank">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>
Injection dans l’articulation du genouIInjection dans l’articulation du genouJoint and tendon steroid injections using image guidanceFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Wrist;Shoulder;Elbow;Knee;Ankle;HipSkeletal systemTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-03-31T04:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD9.0000000000000060.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Apprenez comment les injections de stéroïdes dans les articulations et les tendons peut aider votre enfant.</p><h2>En quoi consistent les injections de stéroïdes dans les articulations et les tendons?</h2><p>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons sont l’une des façons qui permettent de traiter les enfants qui souffrent d’<a href="/aij">arthrite</a> et d’inflammation. Des médicaments, habituellement un stéroïde appelé triamcinolone, sont injectés dans les articulations ou les tendons touchés pour soulager la douleur et l’enflure.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Injection dans l’articulation du </span><span class="asset-image-title">genou</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_steroid_injection_knee_FR.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Lors</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> d’une injection dans une articulation, un médicament est injecté dans une zone de l’articulation appelée espace synovial. L’espace synovial est rempli d’un liquide appelé liquide synovial.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Ce traitement est parfois réalisé à l’aide de guidage par imagerie médicale (au moyen d’ultrasons ou de rayons X), ce qui permet d’insérer une aiguille dans l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon et ainsi d’injecter le médicament au bon endroit. La gaine du tendon est la couche de membrane qui entoure le tendon.</p><p>Le guidage par imagerie est utilisé lorsque les articulations et les tendons touchés sont trop profondément à l’intérieur du corps ou lorsqu’ils sont difficilement observables. Un radiologue d’intervention est chargé des injections lorsqu’elles nécessitent le guidage par imagerie.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons permettent de traiter l’arthrite ou l’inflammation des articulations.</li> <li>Dans le cadre de cette procédure, les enfants reçoivent une anesthésie générale.</li> <li>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons sont généralement considérées comme une procédure à faible risque.</li> <li>Votre enfant doit reposer la zone où les injections ont été effectuées pendant les 48 heures (deux jours) qui suivent la procédure.</li></ul><h2>Le matin des injections dans les articulations et les tendons</h2><p>Arrivez à l’hôpital deux heures avant l’heure prévue de la procédure. Après son enregistrement, votre enfant devra revêtir une blouse d’hôpital; il sera pesé et son état sera évalué par le personnel infirmier. Vous aurez également l’occasion de parler au radiologue d’intervention qui réalisera les injections de stéroïdes et à l’anesthésiste ou au personnel infirmier qui donnera des médicaments à votre enfant pour éviter qu’il soit inconfortable pendant la procédure.</p><p>L’état de votre enfant sera également réévalué par un rhumatologue qui déterminera si d’autres articulations ou tendons doivent être traités.</p><p>Au cours de la procédure, vous devrez patienter dans la salle d’attente.</p><h2>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments antidouleur</h2><p>Les enfants reçoivent des médicaments lorsqu’ils subissent une procédure qui peut leur faire peur ou leur causer de l’inconfort ou de la douleur. La plupart des enfants qui subissent des injections dans les articulations et les tendons recevront une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a>. Le type de médicament que votre enfant se fera administrer en préparation de la procédure dépendra de son état.</p><h2>Comment procède-t-on aux injections?</h2><p>Le radiologue d’intervention utilise des ultrasons ou des rayons X pour localiser l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon. Une fois le site d’injection localisé, il utilise le guidage par imagerie pour insérer une fine aiguille dans l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon.</p><p>Au moyen de cette aiguille, le radiologue d’intervention injecte le stéroïde et un <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=French">anesthésiant local</a>. </p><p>La procédure peut durer de 45 minutes à deux heures, selon le nombre de sites qui feront l’objet d’une injection.</p><h2>Après la procédure</h2><p>Une fois les injections dans les articulations et les tendons réalisées, votre enfant sera déplacé vers la zone de récupération. Le radiologue d’intervention viendra vous parler des détails de la procédure. Dès que votre enfant commencera à se réveiller, le personnel infirmier viendra vous chercher.</p><p>Votre enfant pourrait ressentir une gêne légère aux sites d’injection. Dans ce cas, on lui administrera des médicaments antidouleur.</p><h2>Retour à la maison</h2><p>La plupart des enfants rentrent à la maison le jour même des injections dans les articulations et les tendons, généralement deux heures après la procédure. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur la façon de prendre soin de votre enfant après les injections, veuillez consulter <a href="/Article?contentid=1237&language=French">Injections dans les articulations et les tendons : Prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison après la procédure</a>.</p><h2>Donner son consentement avant la procédure</h2><p>Avant la procédure, le radiologue d’intervention vous expliquera comment et pourquoi la procédure est effectuée ainsi que les avantages et les risques potentiels qui y sont associés. Il détaillera également les efforts qui seront mis en place pour réduire ces risques, et vous aidera à regarder au-delà des risques afin de réaliser les avantages de la procédure. Il est important que vous compreniez bien tous les risques potentiels et les avantages des injections dans les articulations et les tendons et qu’on donne réponse à toutes vos questions. Si vous acceptez que la procédure soit effectuée, vous devrez l’indiquer formellement en signant le formulaire de consentement. Dans le cas de jeunes enfants, le formulaire doit être signé par un parent ou un tuteur légal. La procédure n’aura lieu que si vous donnez votre consentement.</p><h2>Comment préparer votre enfant à la procédure?</h2><p>Avant tout traitement, il est important d’expliquer à l’enfant ce qui va se passer. Ce faisant, utilisez des mots qu’il pourra comprendre clairement. Expliquez-lui qu’il recevra des médicaments afin d’éviter l’inconfort pendant la procédure.</p><p>Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s’attendre. Ils sont également moins inquiets si leurs parents restent calmes et leur offrent leur soutien.</p><h2>Si votre enfant tombe malade dans les deux jours qui précèdent la procédure</h2><p>Il est important que votre enfant soit en bonne santé le jour de la procédure. S’il commence à se sentir malade ou s’il a de la fièvre dans les deux jours qui précèdent la dilatation œsophagienne, informez-en le médecin. Il pourrait être nécessaire de reporter la procédure.</p><h2>Nourriture, boissons et médicaments avant la procédure</h2><p>L’estomac de votre enfant doit être vide pendant la sédation ou l’anesthésie générale, et après.</p><ul><li>Si votre enfant a des besoins particuliers pendant le jeûne, parlez-en à votre médecin afin de planifier son alimentation.</li><li>Votre enfant peut prendre ses médicaments du matin avec une gorgée d’eau, comme d’habitude, deux heures avant la procédure.</li><li>Les médicaments comme l’<a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=French">acide acétylsalicylique (AAS)</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=French">naproxène</a> ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a>, la <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=French">warfarine</a> ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=French">énoxaparine</a> peuvent augmenter le risque de saignement. Ne les administrez pas à votre enfant avant la procédure. Si votre enfant prend l’un de ces médicaments, veuillez en discuter avec le médecin et avec le radiologue d’intervention.</li></ul><h2>À SickKids</h2><p>À l’hôpital SickKids, les radiologues d’intervention travaillent au <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html" target="_blank">service de thérapie guidée par imagerie (TGI)</a>. Vous pouvez appeler la clinique de TGI au 416 813-6054 et parler au personnel infirmier de la clinique pendant les heures de travail (de 8 à 15 h) ou lui laisser un message.</p><p>Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le jeûne, veuillez consulter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html" target="_blank"> Manger et boire avant la chirurgie</a>.</p><p>Pour de plus amples renseignements sur la préparation de votre enfant à la procédure, veuillez consulter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html" target="_blank">Venir à l’hôpital pour une chirurgie​</a>.</p>

 

 

Injection dans l’articulation du genou2452.00000000000Injection dans l’articulation du genouJoint and tendon steroid injections using image guidanceIFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Wrist;Shoulder;Elbow;Knee;Ankle;HipSkeletal systemTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-03-31T04:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD9.0000000000000060.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Apprenez comment les injections de stéroïdes dans les articulations et les tendons peut aider votre enfant.</p><h2>En quoi consistent les injections de stéroïdes dans les articulations et les tendons?</h2><p>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons sont l’une des façons qui permettent de traiter les enfants qui souffrent d’<a href="/aij">arthrite</a> et d’inflammation. Des médicaments, habituellement un stéroïde appelé triamcinolone, sont injectés dans les articulations ou les tendons touchés pour soulager la douleur et l’enflure.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Injection dans l’articulation du </span><span class="asset-image-title">genou</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_steroid_injection_knee_FR.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Lors</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> d’une injection dans une articulation, un médicament est injecté dans une zone de l’articulation appelée espace synovial. L’espace synovial est rempli d’un liquide appelé liquide synovial.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Ce traitement est parfois réalisé à l’aide de guidage par imagerie médicale (au moyen d’ultrasons ou de rayons X), ce qui permet d’insérer une aiguille dans l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon et ainsi d’injecter le médicament au bon endroit. La gaine du tendon est la couche de membrane qui entoure le tendon.</p><p>Le guidage par imagerie est utilisé lorsque les articulations et les tendons touchés sont trop profondément à l’intérieur du corps ou lorsqu’ils sont difficilement observables. Un radiologue d’intervention est chargé des injections lorsqu’elles nécessitent le guidage par imagerie.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons permettent de traiter l’arthrite ou l’inflammation des articulations.</li> <li>Dans le cadre de cette procédure, les enfants reçoivent une anesthésie générale.</li> <li>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons sont généralement considérées comme une procédure à faible risque.</li> <li>Votre enfant doit reposer la zone où les injections ont été effectuées pendant les 48 heures (deux jours) qui suivent la procédure.</li></ul><h2>Le matin des injections dans les articulations et les tendons</h2><p>Arrivez à l’hôpital deux heures avant l’heure prévue de la procédure. Après son enregistrement, votre enfant devra revêtir une blouse d’hôpital; il sera pesé et son état sera évalué par le personnel infirmier. Vous aurez également l’occasion de parler au radiologue d’intervention qui réalisera les injections de stéroïdes et à l’anesthésiste ou au personnel infirmier qui donnera des médicaments à votre enfant pour éviter qu’il soit inconfortable pendant la procédure.</p><p>L’état de votre enfant sera également réévalué par un rhumatologue qui déterminera si d’autres articulations ou tendons doivent être traités.</p><p>Au cours de la procédure, vous devrez patienter dans la salle d’attente.</p><h2>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments antidouleur</h2><p>Les enfants reçoivent des médicaments lorsqu’ils subissent une procédure qui peut leur faire peur ou leur causer de l’inconfort ou de la douleur. La plupart des enfants qui subissent des injections dans les articulations et les tendons recevront une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a>. Le type de médicament que votre enfant se fera administrer en préparation de la procédure dépendra de son état.</p><h2>Comment procède-t-on aux injections?</h2><p>Le radiologue d’intervention utilise des ultrasons ou des rayons X pour localiser l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon. Une fois le site d’injection localisé, il utilise le guidage par imagerie pour insérer une fine aiguille dans l’espace articulaire ou la gaine du tendon.</p><p>Au moyen de cette aiguille, le radiologue d’intervention injecte le stéroïde et un <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=French">anesthésiant local</a>. </p><p>La procédure peut durer de 45 minutes à deux heures, selon le nombre de sites qui feront l’objet d’une injection.</p><h2>Après la procédure</h2><p>Une fois les injections dans les articulations et les tendons réalisées, votre enfant sera déplacé vers la zone de récupération. Le radiologue d’intervention viendra vous parler des détails de la procédure. Dès que votre enfant commencera à se réveiller, le personnel infirmier viendra vous chercher.</p><p>Votre enfant pourrait ressentir une gêne légère aux sites d’injection. Dans ce cas, on lui administrera des médicaments antidouleur.</p><h2>Retour à la maison</h2><p>La plupart des enfants rentrent à la maison le jour même des injections dans les articulations et les tendons, généralement deux heures après la procédure. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur la façon de prendre soin de votre enfant après les injections, veuillez consulter <a href="/Article?contentid=1237&language=French">Injections dans les articulations et les tendons : Prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison après la procédure</a>.</p><h2>Donner son consentement avant la procédure</h2><p>Avant la procédure, le radiologue d’intervention vous expliquera comment et pourquoi la procédure est effectuée ainsi que les avantages et les risques potentiels qui y sont associés. Il détaillera également les efforts qui seront mis en place pour réduire ces risques, et vous aidera à regarder au-delà des risques afin de réaliser les avantages de la procédure. Il est important que vous compreniez bien tous les risques potentiels et les avantages des injections dans les articulations et les tendons et qu’on donne réponse à toutes vos questions. Si vous acceptez que la procédure soit effectuée, vous devrez l’indiquer formellement en signant le formulaire de consentement. Dans le cas de jeunes enfants, le formulaire doit être signé par un parent ou un tuteur légal. La procédure n’aura lieu que si vous donnez votre consentement.</p><h2>Comment préparer votre enfant à la procédure?</h2><p>Avant tout traitement, il est important d’expliquer à l’enfant ce qui va se passer. Ce faisant, utilisez des mots qu’il pourra comprendre clairement. Expliquez-lui qu’il recevra des médicaments afin d’éviter l’inconfort pendant la procédure.</p><p>Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s’attendre. Ils sont également moins inquiets si leurs parents restent calmes et leur offrent leur soutien.</p><h2>Si votre enfant tombe malade dans les deux jours qui précèdent la procédure</h2><p>Il est important que votre enfant soit en bonne santé le jour de la procédure. S’il commence à se sentir malade ou s’il a de la fièvre dans les deux jours qui précèdent la dilatation œsophagienne, informez-en le médecin. Il pourrait être nécessaire de reporter la procédure.</p><h2>Nourriture, boissons et médicaments avant la procédure</h2><p>L’estomac de votre enfant doit être vide pendant la sédation ou l’anesthésie générale, et après.</p><ul><li>Si votre enfant a des besoins particuliers pendant le jeûne, parlez-en à votre médecin afin de planifier son alimentation.</li><li>Votre enfant peut prendre ses médicaments du matin avec une gorgée d’eau, comme d’habitude, deux heures avant la procédure.</li><li>Les médicaments comme l’<a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=French">acide acétylsalicylique (AAS)</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=French">naproxène</a> ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a>, la <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=French">warfarine</a> ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=French">énoxaparine</a> peuvent augmenter le risque de saignement. Ne les administrez pas à votre enfant avant la procédure. Si votre enfant prend l’un de ces médicaments, veuillez en discuter avec le médecin et avec le radiologue d’intervention.</li></ul><h2>Risques associés aux injections dans les articulations et les tendons</h2> <p>Les injections dans les articulations et les tendons sont généralement des procédures à faible risque. Cependant, le risque peut augmenter en fonction de la pathologie, de l’âge et de la santé de votre enfant.</p> <p>Les risques associés aux injections dans les articulations et les tendons comprennent :</p> <ul><li>des ecchymoses ou des saignements de la peau ou des articulations;</li> <li>l’infection (grave, mais très rare);</li> <li>des cicatrices, ou l’amincissement de la peau, au site d’injection;</li> <li>l’accumulation de calcium au site d’injection;</li> <li>la rupture du tendon (grave, mais très rare);</li> <li>des réactions diverses ou changeantes : la réaction aux injections peut être excellente, bonne ou mauvaise, et peut durer une courte période ou une longue période.</li></ul><h2>À SickKids</h2><p>À l’hôpital SickKids, les radiologues d’intervention travaillent au <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html" target="_blank">service de thérapie guidée par imagerie (TGI)</a>. Vous pouvez appeler la clinique de TGI au 416 813-6054 et parler au personnel infirmier de la clinique pendant les heures de travail (de 8 à 15 h) ou lui laisser un message.</p><p>Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le jeûne, veuillez consulter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html" target="_blank"> Manger et boire avant la chirurgie</a>.</p><p>Pour de plus amples renseignements sur la préparation de votre enfant à la procédure, veuillez consulter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html" target="_blank">Venir à l’hôpital pour une chirurgie​</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_steroid_injection_knee_EN.jpgInjection dans l’articulation du genou

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.