Varicocele embolization using image guidanceVVaricocele embolization using image guidanceVaricocele embolization using image guidanceEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)ScrotumVeinsProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZMichelle Cote BScN RN;Joao Amaral, MD10.000000000000053.0000000000000983.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what a varicocele is and how embolization is used to treat is using image guidance.</p><h2>What is a varicocele?</h2><p>A varicocele is an enlargement of the veins in the scrotum. This may cause pain or a heavy sensation in the scrotum. It may also contribute to infertility. A varicocele develops over time.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_varicocele_EN.png" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>What is a varicocele embolization?</h2><p>Embolization is a procedure in which a blood vessel is intentionally blocked to divert blood flow. This procedure is done using image guidance by an interventional radiologist.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A varicocele is an enlargement of the veins in the scrotum.</li> <li>A varicocele embolization is a procedure where the enlarged veins in the scrotum are blocked, diverting blood to other veins.</li> <li>Varicocele embolization is done using image guidance by an interventional radiologist.</li> <li>Varicocele embolizations are considered low risk procedures.</li> <li>Most children go home on the same day as their procedure.</li> </ul><h2>On the day of the varicocele embolization</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital two hours before the planned time of your child’s procedure. Once you are checked in, your child will be dressed in a hospital gown, weighed and assessed by a nurse. You will also be able to speak to the interventional radiologist who will be doing the varicocele embolization and the anaesthetist who will be giving your child medication to make them comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>During the varicocele embolization you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting area.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>Children are given medicine for treatments that may be frightening, uncomfortable or painful. For varicocele embolization, most children are given <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthesia</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">local anesthesia</a> to make sure they are comfortable. The type of medicine that your child will have for the procedure will also depend on your child’s condition.</p><h2>How is a varicocele embolization done?</h2><p>The interventional radiologist will insert a tiny plastic tube, called a catheter, into a vein in the groin or neck through a small (0.5cm) cut in the skin. The catheter is guided through the veins to the varicocele. The interventional radiologist then inserts material through the catheter that blocks the varicocele and diverts blood to other veins. After the vessel has been successfully blocked, the catheter is removed and pressure is applied to the groin or neck to stop bleeding. No stitches are needed.</p><p>The procedure usually takes two hours.</p><h2>After the Varicocele Embolization</h2> <p>Once the varicocele embolization is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p> <h2>Going home</h2> <p>In most cases, children go home the same day after the varicocele embolization. Your doctor will let you know when they are well enough to go home.</p><h2>Visiting the interventional radiologist before the procedure</h2><p>Your child will have a clinic visit with the interventional radiologist before the procedure. During the visit you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health assessment to make sure your child is healthy and that it is safe to have <a href="/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">general anaesthesia</a> and to go ahead with the procedure.</li><li>An overview of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with an interventional radiologist.</li><li>Blood work, if needed.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh any benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of these potential risks and benefits of the varicocele embolization and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of the procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the procedure, let you doctor know. Your child may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink and medicines before the procedure</h2><ul><li> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Your child’s stomach must be empty</a> before sedation or general anaesthetic.<br></li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.</li></ul> <h2>At SickKids</h2><p>At SickKids, the interventional radiologists work in the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Department of Diagnostic Imaging – Division of Image Guided Therapy (IGT)</a>. You can call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-6054 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours (8:00 to 15:00) or leave a message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p><p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p><p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>
Embolisation d’une varicocèle guidée par l’imageEEmbolisation d’une varicocèle guidée par l’imageVaricocele embolization using image guidanceFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)ScrotumVeinsProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZMichelle Cote BScN RN;Joao Amaral, MD10.000000000000053.0000000000000983.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Découvrez ce qu’est l’embolisation d’une varicocèle et comment elle se déroule grâce au guidage par l’image.</p><h2>Qu’est qu’une varicocèle?</h2><p>Une varicocèle est une dilation des veines situées dans le scrotum. La varicocèle peut entraîner des douleurs et une sensation de pression dans le scrotum. Elle peut également contribuer à l'infertilité. La varicocèle se développe avec le temps.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_varicocele_FR.png" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Qu’est-ce que l’embolisation d’une varicocèle?</h2><p>Il s’agit d’une intervention qui permet d'obstruer un vaisseau afin de détourner le flux sanguin. L’intervention est pratiquée par un radiologiste et est faite grâce au guidage par l'image.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une varicocèle est une dilation des veines situées dans le scrotum.</li> <li>L’embolisation d’une varicocèle est une intervention qui permet de bloquer les veines dilatées du scrotum afin de détourner le flux sanguin vers d’autres veines.</li> <li>L'intervention est réalisée grâce au guidage par l'image.</li> <li>L’embolisation d’une varicocèle comporte normalement peu de risques.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants retournent à la maison le jour même de l’embolisation.</li> </ul><h2>Le jour de l’embolisation</h2><p>Rendez-vous à l’hôpital deux heures avant l’heure prévue de l’intervention. Après son admission, le personnel infirmier revêt votre enfant d’une blouse d’hôpital, le pèse et évalue son état de santé. Vous pourrez parler au radiologiste d’intervention et à l’anesthésiste. Celui-ci administre les médicaments qui mettront votre enfant à l’aise.</p><p>Durant le traitement, on vous demande d’attendre dans la salle d’attente de la chirurgie.</p><h2>Votre enfant prendra des médicaments antidouleur</h2><p>On administre des médicaments aux enfants pour des soins qui peuvent être effrayants, inconfortables ou douloureux. Pour l’embolisation d’une varicocèle, on administre une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French"> anesthésie générale</a> et un <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=French"> anesthésique local</a> à la plupart des enfants pour qu'ils soient à l'aise. Le type d'anesthésique donné à votre enfant dépendra de son état de santé.</p><h2>Déroulement de l’embolisation d’une varicocèle</h2><p>Le radiologiste d’intervention fait une petite incision (0,5 cm) dans la peau et insère un petit tube de plastique, appelé un cathéter, dans une veine de l’aine ou du cou. Le radiologiste introduit dans le cathéter une substance qui bloque la variocèle et qui détourne le sang vers d’autres veines. Quand le vaisseau sanguin est bloqué, il retire le cathéter et presse sur l’incision dans l’aine ou le cou pour arrêter le saignement. Pas besoin de points de suture.</p><p>L'intervention dure normalement deux heures.</p><h2>Après l'intervention</h2> <p>Après l’embolisation, votre enfant sera conduit dans la salle de réveil. Le radiologiste viendra vous faire part du déroulement de l’intervention. Dès que votre enfant se réveillera, le personnel infirmier viendra vous chercher.</p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants rentrent à la maison le jour même. Votre médecin vous dira quand l'état de santé de votre enfant sera adéquat pour un retour à la maison.</p><h2>Consultation avec le radiologiste avant l’embolisation</h2><p>Votre enfant consultera le radiologiste d’intervention pour une pré-évaluation. Lors du rendez-vous à la clinique, il faut s’attendre :</p><ul><li>à une évaluation de l’état de santé de votre enfant. On veut établir qu’on peut lui administrer sans danger une <a href="/Article?contentid=1260&language=French">sédation</a> ou une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a> et procéder à l’intervention;</li><li>à une explication du déroulement de l’opération et à une revue du formulaire de consentement par un radiologiste d’intervention;</li><li>au besoin, à des prises de sang.</li></ul><h2>Accorder son consentement</h2><p>Avant de procéder, le radiologiste explique le déroulement et la raison-d'être de l'intervention et il expose ses bienfaits et les risques qui y sont associés. Il énonce les mesures prévues pour réduire ces risques et il vous aide à mettre en balance les bienfaits et les risques. Il importe de comprendre tous les risques et les bienfaits possibles de l’embolisation. Assurez-vous d’obtenir des réponses à toutes vos questions. En signant le formulaire de consentement, vous acceptez l’intervention. C'est le parent ou le tuteur légal qui doit signer le formulaire à la place d'un jeune enfant. Sans votre consentement, l'intervention ne peut avoir lieu.</p><h2>Pour préparer votre enfant</h2><p>Avant qu'on lui donne des soins, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui va se passer. Utilisez des mots qu'il peut comprendre. Dites-lui qu’il recevra des médicaments qui le mettront à l’aise pendant l’intervention. </p><p>Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent ce qui les attend. Les enfants sont aussi moins inquiets quand leurs parents sont calmes et démontrent leur soutien.</p><h2>Si votre enfant tombe malade dans les deux jours précédant le traitement</h2><p>Il est important que votre enfant soit en bonne santé le jour du traitement. S’il se sent mal ou a une fièvre dans les deux jours qui le précèdent, prévenez votre médecin. Il se peut que l'intervention doive être reportée.</p><h2>Manger, boire et prendre des médicaments</h2><ul><li> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html/">L'estomac de votre enfant </a> (en anglais) doit être vide avant une sédation ou une anesthésie générale.</li><li>Si votre enfant a des besoins particuliers pendant le jeûne, adressez-vous à votre médecin.</li><li>Votre enfant peut prendre ses médicaments habituels du matin avec une gorgée d’eau deux heures avant l’intervention.</li><li>Les médicaments tels que l’<a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=French">AAS (Acide acétylsalicylique)</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=178&language=French">naproxen</a>, l’<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=French">warfarine</a>, ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=French">énoxaparine</a> augmentent le risque de saignement. Ne pas administrer ces médicaments à votre enfant avant l’intervention sans l’autorisation de son médecin et du radiologiste d’intervention.</li></ul>​​<h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2> <p>À l'hôpital SickKids, les radiologistes d’intervention sont affectés au <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Service d’imagerie diagnostique à la Clinique de la thérapie guidée par image</a> (en anglais). Pour joindre la clinique, faire le 416-813-6504. Vous pouvez parler au personnel durant les heures de travail, entre 8 h et 15 h, ou encore lui demander de transmettre un message. </p> <p>Pour en savoir plus sur le jeûne, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">boire et manger avant une chirurgie</a> (en anglais). </p> <p>Pour savoir comment bien préparer votre enfant, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">se préparer à une chirurgie​</a> (en anglais).</p> ​​

 

 

Embolisation d’une varicocèle guidée par l’image2473.00000000000Embolisation d’une varicocèle guidée par l’imageVaricocele embolization using image guidanceEFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)ScrotumVeinsProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZMichelle Cote BScN RN;Joao Amaral, MD10.000000000000053.0000000000000983.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Découvrez ce qu’est l’embolisation d’une varicocèle et comment elle se déroule grâce au guidage par l’image.</p><h2>Qu’est qu’une varicocèle?</h2><p>Une varicocèle est une dilation des veines situées dans le scrotum. La varicocèle peut entraîner des douleurs et une sensation de pression dans le scrotum. Elle peut également contribuer à l'infertilité. La varicocèle se développe avec le temps.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_varicocele_FR.png" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Qu’est-ce que l’embolisation d’une varicocèle?</h2><p>Il s’agit d’une intervention qui permet d'obstruer un vaisseau afin de détourner le flux sanguin. L’intervention est pratiquée par un radiologiste et est faite grâce au guidage par l'image.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une varicocèle est une dilation des veines situées dans le scrotum.</li> <li>L’embolisation d’une varicocèle est une intervention qui permet de bloquer les veines dilatées du scrotum afin de détourner le flux sanguin vers d’autres veines.</li> <li>L'intervention est réalisée grâce au guidage par l'image.</li> <li>L’embolisation d’une varicocèle comporte normalement peu de risques.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants retournent à la maison le jour même de l’embolisation.</li> </ul><h2>Suivi</h2><p>Votre enfant aura un rendez-vous de suivi avec son urologue. Après six mois, on lui fera une échographie, et il se rendra à la clinique pour une consultation de suivi avec le radiologiste d’intervention.</p><p>Pour en savoir plus sur les soins à donner à votre enfant après une embolisation, lire <a href="/Article?contentid=1225&language=French"> Embolisation d’une varicocèle : soignez votre enfant à la maison après l’intervention</a>.</p><h2>Le jour de l’embolisation</h2><p>Rendez-vous à l’hôpital deux heures avant l’heure prévue de l’intervention. Après son admission, le personnel infirmier revêt votre enfant d’une blouse d’hôpital, le pèse et évalue son état de santé. Vous pourrez parler au radiologiste d’intervention et à l’anesthésiste. Celui-ci administre les médicaments qui mettront votre enfant à l’aise.</p><p>Durant le traitement, on vous demande d’attendre dans la salle d’attente de la chirurgie.</p><h2>Votre enfant prendra des médicaments antidouleur</h2><p>On administre des médicaments aux enfants pour des soins qui peuvent être effrayants, inconfortables ou douloureux. Pour l’embolisation d’une varicocèle, on administre une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French"> anesthésie générale</a> et un <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=French"> anesthésique local</a> à la plupart des enfants pour qu'ils soient à l'aise. Le type d'anesthésique donné à votre enfant dépendra de son état de santé.</p><h2>Déroulement de l’embolisation d’une varicocèle</h2><p>Le radiologiste d’intervention fait une petite incision (0,5 cm) dans la peau et insère un petit tube de plastique, appelé un cathéter, dans une veine de l’aine ou du cou. Le radiologiste introduit dans le cathéter une substance qui bloque la variocèle et qui détourne le sang vers d’autres veines. Quand le vaisseau sanguin est bloqué, il retire le cathéter et presse sur l’incision dans l’aine ou le cou pour arrêter le saignement. Pas besoin de points de suture.</p><p>L'intervention dure normalement deux heures.</p><h2>Après l'intervention</h2> <p>Après l’embolisation, votre enfant sera conduit dans la salle de réveil. Le radiologiste viendra vous faire part du déroulement de l’intervention. Dès que votre enfant se réveillera, le personnel infirmier viendra vous chercher.</p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants rentrent à la maison le jour même. Votre médecin vous dira quand l'état de santé de votre enfant sera adéquat pour un retour à la maison.</p><h2>Consultation avec le radiologiste avant l’embolisation</h2><p>Votre enfant consultera le radiologiste d’intervention pour une pré-évaluation. Lors du rendez-vous à la clinique, il faut s’attendre :</p><ul><li>à une évaluation de l’état de santé de votre enfant. On veut établir qu’on peut lui administrer sans danger une <a href="/Article?contentid=1260&language=French">sédation</a> ou une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a> et procéder à l’intervention;</li><li>à une explication du déroulement de l’opération et à une revue du formulaire de consentement par un radiologiste d’intervention;</li><li>au besoin, à des prises de sang.</li></ul><h2>Accorder son consentement</h2><p>Avant de procéder, le radiologiste explique le déroulement et la raison-d'être de l'intervention et il expose ses bienfaits et les risques qui y sont associés. Il énonce les mesures prévues pour réduire ces risques et il vous aide à mettre en balance les bienfaits et les risques. Il importe de comprendre tous les risques et les bienfaits possibles de l’embolisation. Assurez-vous d’obtenir des réponses à toutes vos questions. En signant le formulaire de consentement, vous acceptez l’intervention. C'est le parent ou le tuteur légal qui doit signer le formulaire à la place d'un jeune enfant. Sans votre consentement, l'intervention ne peut avoir lieu.</p><h2>Pour préparer votre enfant</h2><p>Avant qu'on lui donne des soins, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui va se passer. Utilisez des mots qu'il peut comprendre. Dites-lui qu’il recevra des médicaments qui le mettront à l’aise pendant l’intervention. </p><p>Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent ce qui les attend. Les enfants sont aussi moins inquiets quand leurs parents sont calmes et démontrent leur soutien.</p><h2>Si votre enfant tombe malade dans les deux jours précédant le traitement</h2><p>Il est important que votre enfant soit en bonne santé le jour du traitement. S’il se sent mal ou a une fièvre dans les deux jours qui le précèdent, prévenez votre médecin. Il se peut que l'intervention doive être reportée.</p><h2>Manger, boire et prendre des médicaments</h2><ul><li> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html/">L'estomac de votre enfant </a> (en anglais) doit être vide avant une sédation ou une anesthésie générale.</li><li>Si votre enfant a des besoins particuliers pendant le jeûne, adressez-vous à votre médecin.</li><li>Votre enfant peut prendre ses médicaments habituels du matin avec une gorgée d’eau deux heures avant l’intervention.</li><li>Les médicaments tels que l’<a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=French">AAS (Acide acétylsalicylique)</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=178&language=French">naproxen</a>, l’<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=French">warfarine</a>, ou l’<a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=French">énoxaparine</a> augmentent le risque de saignement. Ne pas administrer ces médicaments à votre enfant avant l’intervention sans l’autorisation de son médecin et du radiologiste d’intervention.</li></ul><h2>Risques associés à l’embolisation d’une varicocèle</h2><p>L’embolisation présente normalement peu de risques. Les risques peuvent augmenter selon le trouble dont souffre l’enfant, son âge et son état de santé.</p><p>Voici certaines complications possibles :</p><ul><li>douleur</li><li>infection;</li><li>saignement, ecchymoses dans l’aine et sur le cou</li><li>enflure des testicules</li><li>atrophie testiculaire (réduction de la taille des testicules)</li><li>lésion à un vaisseau ou à un nerf</li><li>sang dans l’urine<br></li></ul>​​<h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2> <p>À l'hôpital SickKids, les radiologistes d’intervention sont affectés au <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Service d’imagerie diagnostique à la Clinique de la thérapie guidée par image</a> (en anglais). Pour joindre la clinique, faire le 416-813-6504. Vous pouvez parler au personnel durant les heures de travail, entre 8 h et 15 h, ou encore lui demander de transmettre un message. </p> <p>Pour en savoir plus sur le jeûne, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">boire et manger avant une chirurgie</a> (en anglais). </p> <p>Pour savoir comment bien préparer votre enfant, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">se préparer à une chirurgie​</a> (en anglais).</p> ​​Embolisation d’une varicocèle guidée par l’image

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.