Screening for complicationsSScreening for complicationsScreening for complicationsEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how often your child needs to be screened for diabetes complications and what you can expect from each test and screening.</p><p>Screening for risk factors and complications starts at diagnosis of <a>diabetes</a>. Even though complications rarely occur in children and in teenagers, screening is important because detecting complications at an early stage allows for actions to help slow their progression. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will have regular screening tests for complications of diabetes.</li> <li>Your child will need different tests depending on how long they've had diabetes, and whether they have type 1 or type 2.</li></ul>
Dépistage des complications liées au diabèteDDépistage des complications liées au diabèteScreening for complicationsFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à quelle fréquence votre enfant doit subir des tests de dépistage des complications liées au diabète et ce à quoi il faut vous attendre de chaque test et du dépistage.<br></p><p>Le dépistage des facteurs de risque et des complications commence au moment du diagnostic du diabète. Même si des complications sont rares chez les enfants et chez les adolescents, leur dépistage est important, car la détection de complications à un stade précoce permet d’agir en vue de ralentir leur progression.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Votre enfant subira régulièrement des tests de dépistage pour déceler les complications liées au diabète.</li> <li>Les tests varieront selon le type de diabète dont il est atteint, soit de type 1 ou 2, et depuis quand. </li></ul>

 

 

Screening for complications2521.00000000000Screening for complicationsScreening for complicationsSEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how often your child needs to be screened for diabetes complications and what you can expect from each test and screening.</p><p>Screening for risk factors and complications starts at diagnosis of <a>diabetes</a>. Even though complications rarely occur in children and in teenagers, screening is important because detecting complications at an early stage allows for actions to help slow their progression. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will have regular screening tests for complications of diabetes.</li> <li>Your child will need different tests depending on how long they've had diabetes, and whether they have type 1 or type 2.</li></ul><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/screening_for_complications_of_diabetes.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Screening for complications of type 1 diabetes </h2><p>The <a href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">diabetes team</a> will recommend on a regular basis some of the following blood and urine tests, and examinations to:</p><ul><li>screen for complications</li><li>monitor blood glucose (sugar) control</li><li>monitor for conditions that occur more often in people with <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/what-is-diabetes/type-1-diabetes/Pages/default.aspx">type 1 diabetes</a>.</li></ul><p>Your child’s health-care team will advise more frequent testing and interventions if they discover any problems.</p><table class="AKH-table" style="width:570px;"><thead><tr><th colspan="3"> Screening for complications of type 1 diabetes </th></tr><tr><th width="23%"> Complication </th><th> How do we screen for it? </th><th> How often? </th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong>Hypertension</strong> (high blood pressure)</td><td>Blood pressure</td><td>At least twice per year </td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Dyslipidemia</strong> (blood fat levels out of range)</td><td>Blood test</td><td>Screen at 12 and 17 years of age <br> <br>Children younger than 12 years of age with risk factors</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Nephropathy</strong> (kidney damage)</td><td>Urine sample</td><td>Yearly screening starting at 12 years of age in those who have had type 1 diabetes longer than 5 years</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Retinopathy</strong> (eye damage)</td><td>Eye check-up with an optometrist in your community to detect early diabetic retinopathy <br> <br>Diabetes eye exams should include a check of the retina. Eye drops are used to widen the pupils so that back of the eye can be seen</td><td>Yearly screening starting at 15 years of age for teens who have had type 1 diabetes for longer than 5 years <br> <br>Screening can increase to once every 2 years for teens who have good glycemic control, have had type 1 diabetes for less than 10 years and did not have retinopathy at the inititial eye assessment</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Neuropathy</strong> (nerve damage)</td><td>Questions and physical examination</td><td>Yearly screening in adolescents post-puberty with poor control, who have had diabetes for longer than 5 years</td></tr></tbody></table> ​​​​​​​ <h2>Screening for complications of type 2 diabetes</h2><p>Because type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a long time, some of these complications may have started by the time of diagnosis. For this reason, the screening for complications in children with type 2 diabetes should start at diagnosis. </p><p>Your child’s health-care team will recommend some of the following blood and urine tests. </p><p>The health-care team will recommend more frequent testing and interventions if they discover any problems.</p><table class="AKH-table"><thead><tr><th colspan="3"> Screening for complications of type 2 diabetes </th></tr><tr><th width="23%"> Complication </th><th> How do we screen for it? </th><th> How often? </th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong>Hypertension</strong> (high blood pressure)</td><td>Blood pressure</td><td>At every diabetes visit after diagnosis (at least twice a year)</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Dyslipidemia</strong> (blood fat levels out of range)</td><td>Fasting blood test</td><td>At diagnosis and every 1-3 years after</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Nephropathy</strong> (kidney damage)</td><td>Urine test</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Retinopathy</strong> (eye damage)</td><td>Eye check-up with an optometrist in your community to detect early diabetic retinopathy <br> <br>Diabetes eye exams should include a check of the retina. Eye drops are used to widen the pupils so that back of the eye can be seen</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Neuropathy</strong> (nerve damage)</td><td>Questions and physical examination</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr></tbody></table> ​​ <br>Screening for complications

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