WarfarinWWarfarinWarfarinEnglishPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-04-11T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh65.00000000000008.000000000000001653.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called warfarin. This information sheet explains what warfarin does, how to give it, and possible side effects your child may experience.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called warfarin (say: WAR-far-in). This information sheet explains what warfarin does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when he or she takes this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving warfarin to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child:</p> <ul><li>has ever reacted badly to warfarin or any other medicine, preservative or colouring agent</li> <li>has recently had or will be having procedures that can increase the risk of bleeding (e.g. surgery) </li> <li>has any other conditions that increase the risk of bleeding, or has any active bleeding</li> <li>has very high blood pressure </li> <li>may be pregnant </li></ul> <p>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has:</p> <ul><li>kidney or liver problems </li> <li>diabetes </li> <li>heart failure </li></ul> <h3>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with warfarin or in some cases the dose of warfarin or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. </h3> <p>It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter or herbal) including:?</p> <ul><li>medicines used for pain or fever: Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA</a> (Aspirin ) and <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> (Motrin, Advil) usually cannot be given while on warfarin as they may increase the risk of bleeding. Some cold and flu medicines contain <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> too. Check with your pharmacist or doctor first.</li> <li>any other medicines that can affect blood clotting, such as heparin, <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> (Lovenox), or <a href="/Article?contentid=253&language=English">tinzaparin</a> (Innohep)<br></li> <li>antibiotics such as <a href="/Article?contentid=100&language=English">ciprofloxacin</a> (Cipro), <a href="/Article?contentid=131&language=English">erythromycin</a> (Eryc), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Septra) </li> <li>herbals including: cranberry juice/products, St. John's Wort, ginseng, garlic, coenzyme Q10 <br></li></ul><h2>How should you give your child warfarin?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child warfarin:</p> <ul><li>give your child warfarin exactly as the doctor or pharmacist tells you to </li> <li>give your child this medicine at the same times each day</li> <li>warfarin can be taken with or without food </li> <li>give warfarin with food if it causes an upset stomach</li> <li>if your child has difficulty swallowing tablets, dissolve the tablets in a small amount of fluid such as water or juice, or you may crush the tablets and mix it in a spoonful of applesauce or pudding. <br></li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of warfarin?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of this medicine:</p> <ul><li>give the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li> <li>if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time.</li> <li>do not give two doses to make up for one missed dose.</li> <li>never give more than one dose a day.</li></ul><h2>How long does warfarin take to work?</h2> <p>Warfarin begins to work within 24 hours after first taking it but the full effect may take 3 to 4 days to occur. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of warfarin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while he or she takes warfarin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child:</p> <ul><li>Bleeding or bruising more easily than normal e.g. increased bleeding from cuts, bleeding from the gums when brushing teeth; bruising or purplish areas on the skin; nosebleeds; for older girls, longer or heavier menstrual periods.</li> <li>Headache</li></ul> <p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call the Thrombosis Team or your child's doctor right away, or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>Unusual or severe bleeding. For example, a very long nosebleed, blood in the urine or stools (red/dark urine, red/black tarry stools), coughing or throwing up blood or material that looks like coffee grounds, bleeding from cuts and wounds that does not stop. </li> <li>Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting</li> <li>Severe stomach pain </li> <li>Swelling in hands, ankles, or feet</li> <li>Numbness, tingling, or weakness anywhere in the body, or problems with movement, swallowing, or speech. </li> <li>Signs of a life-threatening reaction including: wheezing; shortness of breath, chest tightness or chest pain; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin colour; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.</li> <li>Purple discoloration of the toes or the soles of the feet, or new pain in a leg, foot, or toes.<br></li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using warfarin?</h2> <p>Before starting treatment with warfarin, inform the doctor if your child has problems with coordination as falling often may increase the risk of bleeding. During warfarin treatment, talk to the doctor immediately if your child has a bad fall, especially if your child hit their head. </p> <p>Contact sports are not recommended, such as hockey or football. He or she may get bruised and bleed more easily from injuries. Head protection is important for sports, such as bicycling or rollerblading. </p> <p>Before your child has any kind of surgery (including dental work), medical procedure or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking warfarin. Please call the Thrombosis Service in advance. It may be necessary to stop giving this medicine temporarily to prevent bleeding from the surgery or procedure. </p> <p>Inform your child's doctor before your child gets a vaccine by needle. Needles into the muscle may cause bleeding in patients taking this medicine. </p> <p>Vitamin K can reverse the effects of warfarin and can be found in various multivitamins, dietary supplements, and foods. Foods that have large amounts of vitamin K are dark green, leafy vegetables (alfalfa, asparagus, broccoli, brussel sprouts, collard greens, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, lettuce, spinach, and water cress), green tea, liver, and some vegetable oils. Foods rich in vitamin K do not need to be avoided, but make sure the amount of these foods your child eats is similar from day to day. </p> <p>Inform your child's doctor if your child develops an illness including symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, or fever or has a change in eating habits as the doctor may want to adjust the dose of warfarin. </p> <p>For older boys and girls, alcohol use should be avoided during warfarin treatment. Excessive alcohol use can increase the risk of bleeding with warfarin. </p> <p>There is a chance that warfarin may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active it is best that she use some kind of birth control while receiving warfarin. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant.</p> <p>It may be recommended that your child wear a Medic Alert bracelet or necklace while taking warfarin. The Thrombosis Team will tell you if this is needed depending on how long your child will be on warfarin.</p><h2>How much of warfarin does my child need?</h2><p>How much warfarin your child needs will depend on how his or her body responds to the medicine. The dose is changed according to the results of bloodwork, called INR. Follow your doctor's instructions for the right amount of warfarin to give</p><h2>What other important information should I know about warfarin?</h2><ul><li>When starting warfarin treatment, your child will need routine bloodwork (INR tests) to determine if the dose needs to be changed. The INR test is used to determine how much warfarin your child needs. Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office and for blood tests, so that your child's response to warfarin can be checked. It may be helpful for you to use a calendar to keep track of how much warfarin is taken each day, changes in doses, and blood test appointments. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is taking and show the list to the doctor and pharmacist. Also, inform them if there are ever any changes or additions to your child's medications or diet. </li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough warfarin to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills.</li><li>Keep warfarin at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>
WarfarineWWarfarineWarfarinFrenchPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZRita V. Kutti, BScPhm, RPh000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>La présente fiche de renseignements explique comment agit la warfarine et comment l'administrer à votre enfant.</p><p>Votre enfant doit prendre un médicament qui se nomme « warfarine ». La présente fiche de renseignements explique comment agit la warfarine et comment l'administrer à votre enfant. Elle explique également les effets secondaires ou les problèmes que votre enfant pourrait éprouver en prenant ce médicament. </p><h2>Comment administrer ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Suivez les directives suivantes pour donner de la warfarine à votre enfant :</p> <ul><li>Administrez ce médicament de façon régulière, exactement comme le médecin ou le pharmacien vous l'a indiqué. Évitez de manquer des doses en administrant ce médicament à la même heure tous les jours. Parlez au médecin de votre enfant avant de cesser ce médicament pour quelque raison que ce soit. </li> <li>Suivez les directives du document « Contenant de dissolution et de dosage » pour administrer ce médicament avec un tel contenant. </li></ul> <p>Pour plus de renseignements à cet égard, consultez « <a href="/Article?contentid=991&language=French" target="_blank">Utilisation de contenants à dissolution et à dosage </a>». </p><h2>Que faire si votre enfant manque une dose?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant manque une dose de ce médicament, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Communiquez avec votre médecin pour obtenir des directives. </li> <li>Donnez seulement une dose à la fois. </li></ul><h2>Quels sont les effets secondaires possibles de ce médicament?</h2> <p>Votre enfant pourrait éprouver certains des effets secondaires suivants pendant qu'il prend de la warfarine. Habituellement, il n'est pas nécessaire de consulter un médecin à ce sujet. </p> <p>Ces effets secondaires pourraient se dissiper au fur et à mesure que le corps de votre enfant s'habitue à la warfarine. Consultez le médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier continue d'afficher un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants, s'ils ne se dissipent pas ou s'ils le dérangent : </p> <ul><li>Maux d'estomac, vomissements </li> <li>Fièvre </li> <li>Selles aqueuses (diarrhée) </li> <li>Perte d'appétit </li></ul> <h3>La plupart des effets secondaires suivants ne sont pas courants et pourraient laisser présager un problème grave. Téléphonez immédiatement au médecin de votre enfant ou rendez-vous à la salle d'urgence si votre enfant a l'un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Urine rouge ou foncée </li> <li>Maux d'estomac aigus </li> <li>Saignements ou bleus inhabituels</li> <li>Selles rouges ou noires et poisseuses</li> <li>Douleurs articulaires, raideur ou enflure</li> <li>Vomir du sang ou une substance qui ressemble à des marcs de café</li></ul><h2>Autres renseignements importants</h2><ul><li>Conservez tous les rendez-vous à la clinique ou au bureau du médecin ainsi que les rendez-vous pour les analyses sanguines afin que l'on puisse vérifier comment votre enfant réagit à la warfarine. </li><li>Souvenez-vous de la couleur et de la concentration du type de warfarine que prend votre enfant. La concentration est indiquée sur le comprimé (comme 1 mg, 2 mg, 2,5 mg, 4 mg, 5 mg ou 10 mg). </li><li>Avant que votre enfant subisse une chirurgie, y compris une chirurgie dentaire, ou qu'il reçoive des soins d'urgence, informez le médecin ou le dentiste que votre enfant prend de la warfarine. Il faudra cesser ce médicament temporairement afin d'éviter des saignements en raison de la chirurgie ou de l'intervention. </li><li>Consultez votre médecin avant que l'on donne tout autre médicament à votre enfant, comme un vaccin, au moyen d'une injection. Les injections dans le muscle peuvent provoquer des saignements chez les patients qui prennent ce médicament. </li><li>Consultez votre médecin ou pharmacien avant de donner tout autre médicament à votre enfant, même les médicaments disponibles en vente libre (avec prescription). Certains médicaments, comme l'Aspirin®, les antibiotiques et les vitamines, pourraient changer les besoins en warfarine et provoquer des saignements. Certains médicaments complémentaires (les produits à base d'herbes médicinales ou les produits naturels) peuvent également avoir une incidence sur la warfarine. </li><li>Certains aliments peuvent avoir une incidence sur la façon dont votre enfant réagit à la warfarine. Cela comprend les viandes, l'huile de soya et les protéines de soya, les légumes à feuilles vertes, le brocoli, le chou-fleur et les produits laitiers comme le lait, le fromage et le yogourt. Il est important d'éviter de modifier substantiellement la consommation de ces aliments chez votre enfant. Avisez votre médecin si votre enfant affiche un changement soudain de ses habitudes alimentaires ou s'il ne peut manger régulièrement pendant quelques jours en raison d'une gastro-entérite ou d'une autre maladie. </li><li>Assurez-vous de toujours avoir des réserves suffisantes de warfarine pour les fins de semaine, les congés et les vacances. Téléphonez à la pharmacie pour renouveler votre prescription au moins 2 jours avant d'avoir épuisé tous les médicaments. </li><li>Demandez à votre médecin s'il est nécessaire que votre enfant porte un bracelet medic-alert.<span id="ms-rterangecursor-start" aria-hidden="true"></span><span id="ms-rterangecursor-end" aria-hidden="true"></span><br></li></ul>

 

 

Warfarine265.000000000000WarfarineWarfarinWFrenchPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZRita V. Kutti, BScPhm, RPh000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>La présente fiche de renseignements explique comment agit la warfarine et comment l'administrer à votre enfant.</p><p>Votre enfant doit prendre un médicament qui se nomme « warfarine ». La présente fiche de renseignements explique comment agit la warfarine et comment l'administrer à votre enfant. Elle explique également les effets secondaires ou les problèmes que votre enfant pourrait éprouver en prenant ce médicament. </p><h2>Qu'est-ce que la warfarine?</h2> <p>On utilise la warfarine pour empêcher le sang de coaguler trop rapidement et pour prévenir l'apparition de caillots dangereux dans les vaisseaux sanguins.</p> <p>On connaît également la warfarine sous son nom de marque : Coumadin®.</p><h2>Comment administrer ce médicament à votre enfant</h2> <p>Suivez les directives suivantes pour donner de la warfarine à votre enfant :</p> <ul><li>Administrez ce médicament de façon régulière, exactement comme le médecin ou le pharmacien vous l'a indiqué. Évitez de manquer des doses en administrant ce médicament à la même heure tous les jours. Parlez au médecin de votre enfant avant de cesser ce médicament pour quelque raison que ce soit. </li> <li>Suivez les directives du document « Contenant de dissolution et de dosage » pour administrer ce médicament avec un tel contenant. </li></ul> <p>Pour plus de renseignements à cet égard, consultez « <a href="/Article?contentid=991&language=French" target="_blank">Utilisation de contenants à dissolution et à dosage </a>». </p><h2>Que faire si votre enfant manque une dose?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant manque une dose de ce médicament, faites ce qui suit :</p> <ul><li>Communiquez avec votre médecin pour obtenir des directives. </li> <li>Donnez seulement une dose à la fois. </li></ul><h2>Quels sont les effets secondaires possibles de ce médicament?</h2> <p>Votre enfant pourrait éprouver certains des effets secondaires suivants pendant qu'il prend de la warfarine. Habituellement, il n'est pas nécessaire de consulter un médecin à ce sujet. </p> <p>Ces effets secondaires pourraient se dissiper au fur et à mesure que le corps de votre enfant s'habitue à la warfarine. Consultez le médecin de votre enfant si ce dernier continue d'afficher un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants, s'ils ne se dissipent pas ou s'ils le dérangent : </p> <ul><li>Maux d'estomac, vomissements </li> <li>Fièvre </li> <li>Selles aqueuses (diarrhée) </li> <li>Perte d'appétit </li></ul> <h3>La plupart des effets secondaires suivants ne sont pas courants et pourraient laisser présager un problème grave. Téléphonez immédiatement au médecin de votre enfant ou rendez-vous à la salle d'urgence si votre enfant a l'un ou plusieurs des effets secondaires suivants : </h3> <ul><li>Urine rouge ou foncée </li> <li>Maux d'estomac aigus </li> <li>Saignements ou bleus inhabituels</li> <li>Selles rouges ou noires et poisseuses</li> <li>Douleurs articulaires, raideur ou enflure</li> <li>Vomir du sang ou une substance qui ressemble à des marcs de café</li></ul><h2>Autres renseignements importants</h2><ul><li>Conservez tous les rendez-vous à la clinique ou au bureau du médecin ainsi que les rendez-vous pour les analyses sanguines afin que l'on puisse vérifier comment votre enfant réagit à la warfarine. </li><li>Souvenez-vous de la couleur et de la concentration du type de warfarine que prend votre enfant. La concentration est indiquée sur le comprimé (comme 1 mg, 2 mg, 2,5 mg, 4 mg, 5 mg ou 10 mg). </li><li>Avant que votre enfant subisse une chirurgie, y compris une chirurgie dentaire, ou qu'il reçoive des soins d'urgence, informez le médecin ou le dentiste que votre enfant prend de la warfarine. Il faudra cesser ce médicament temporairement afin d'éviter des saignements en raison de la chirurgie ou de l'intervention. </li><li>Consultez votre médecin avant que l'on donne tout autre médicament à votre enfant, comme un vaccin, au moyen d'une injection. Les injections dans le muscle peuvent provoquer des saignements chez les patients qui prennent ce médicament. </li><li>Consultez votre médecin ou pharmacien avant de donner tout autre médicament à votre enfant, même les médicaments disponibles en vente libre (avec prescription). Certains médicaments, comme l'Aspirin®, les antibiotiques et les vitamines, pourraient changer les besoins en warfarine et provoquer des saignements. Certains médicaments complémentaires (les produits à base d'herbes médicinales ou les produits naturels) peuvent également avoir une incidence sur la warfarine. </li><li>Certains aliments peuvent avoir une incidence sur la façon dont votre enfant réagit à la warfarine. Cela comprend les viandes, l'huile de soya et les protéines de soya, les légumes à feuilles vertes, le brocoli, le chou-fleur et les produits laitiers comme le lait, le fromage et le yogourt. Il est important d'éviter de modifier substantiellement la consommation de ces aliments chez votre enfant. Avisez votre médecin si votre enfant affiche un changement soudain de ses habitudes alimentaires ou s'il ne peut manger régulièrement pendant quelques jours en raison d'une gastro-entérite ou d'une autre maladie. </li><li>Assurez-vous de toujours avoir des réserves suffisantes de warfarine pour les fins de semaine, les congés et les vacances. Téléphonez à la pharmacie pour renouveler votre prescription au moins 2 jours avant d'avoir épuisé tous les médicaments. </li><li>Demandez à votre médecin s'il est nécessaire que votre enfant porte un bracelet medic-alert.<span id="ms-rterangecursor-start" aria-hidden="true"></span><span id="ms-rterangecursor-end" aria-hidden="true"></span><br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.pngWarfarineWarfarine

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.