Palliative care for children with leukemiaPPalliative care for children with leukemiaPalliative Care for Children with LeukemiaEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseases;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn when palliative care would be introduced for children with leukemia.</p><p>To "palliate" means to relieve. The goal of palliative care is to maximize quality of life and comfort for your child.</p> <p>Palliative care uses intensive, active care to relieve physical and emotional symptoms. It embraces the child as a whole, and considers the child's physical, emotional, spiritual, and social needs. Palliative care also considers the needs of the family.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Palliative care is usually introduced when the goal of treatment is no longer curing your child’s leukemia, but making your child feel as comfortable as possible.</li> <li> Your child's health care team and the hospital's palliative care service generally coordinate palliative care.</li></ul>
Soins palliatifs d’enfants atteints de leucémieSSoins palliatifs d’enfants atteints de leucémiePalliative Care for Children with LeukemiaFrenchOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseases;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MDFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à quel moment les soins palliatifs seront introduits pour les enfants atteints de leucémie.</p><p>Le terme « pallier » veut dire remédier. Le but des soins palliatifs est de maximiser la qualité de vie et le confort de votre enfant.<br></p><p>Les soins palliatifs incluent des soins intensifs et actifs pour soulager les symptômes physiques et émotionnels. Ce sont des soins holistiques qui tiennent compte des besoins physiques, émotionnels, spirituels et sociaux de l’enfant. Les soins palliatifs tiennent aussi compte des besoins de la famille.</p><h2>À retenir<br></h2><ul><li>Les soins palliatifs sont habituellement introduits lorsque le but du traitement n’est plus de guérir la leucémie de votre enfant, mais plutôt de rendre votre enfant aussi confortable que possible.</li><li>L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant et le service des soins palliatifs de l’hôpital coordonnent généralement les soins palliatifs.</li></ul>

 

 

Palliative care for children with leukemia2877.00000000000Palliative care for children with leukemiaPalliative Care for Children with LeukemiaPEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseases;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn when palliative care would be introduced for children with leukemia.</p><p>To "palliate" means to relieve. The goal of palliative care is to maximize quality of life and comfort for your child.</p> <p>Palliative care uses intensive, active care to relieve physical and emotional symptoms. It embraces the child as a whole, and considers the child's physical, emotional, spiritual, and social needs. Palliative care also considers the needs of the family.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Palliative care is usually introduced when the goal of treatment is no longer curing your child’s leukemia, but making your child feel as comfortable as possible.</li> <li> Your child's health care team and the hospital's palliative care service generally coordinate palliative care.</li></ul><h2>When to consider palliative care</h2> <p>For children with leukemia, palliative care is usually introduced when the leukemia is very difficult to treat. The goal of treatment is no longer focused on curing your child’s leukemia. Instead, care is focused on making your child feel as comfortable as possible. Often families pursue palliative care while discussing other chemotherapy options with their health care team, including potential experimental therapies. </p> <p>Palliative care may be part of your conversation with your child’s health care team for many reasons. Your discussion may be about: </p> <ul><li>goals of care for your child</li> <li>your child's quality of life</li> <li> relieving your child’s pain and other symptoms</li> <li> information and support for siblings and other family members</li> <li>end-of-life care</li> <li>grief and bereavement support</li></ul> <h2>Who provides palliative care?</h2> <p>Generally, your child's health care team and the hospital's palliative care service coordinate palliative care. They count on the services of a full range of other health care professionals to meet the needs of the child and family. This includes:</p> <ul><li> doctors</li> <li>nurses</li> <li> psychologists</li> <li> physiotherapists</li> <li> occupational therapists</li> <li> social workers</li> <li> music therapists </li> </ul> <h2>End-of-life care</h2> <p>One component of palliative care is to help families plan for end-of-life care. This can involve receiving help with:</p> <ul><li> establishing goals of care and identifying what is most important to you and your child</li> <li> planning end-of-life care in your preferred setting</li> <li> creating legacies and memories</li> <li>ensuring your child’s comfort</li> <li>support you during your grieving</li></ul>Palliative care for children with leukemiaFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.