G/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tubeGG/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tubeG/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tubeEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2011-03-29T04:00:00ZJulia Kelly, RN5.9000000000000076.7000000000000595.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn why some children need feeding tubes. Find an overview of the two types of feeding tubes, G and GJ tubes, how they are put in and how they are used.<br></p><p>Your child needs to be fed through a feeding tube. These feedings are called enteral feedings. An enteral feeding is a way of giving food and liquids through a tube directly into your child’s stomach or small bowel.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Feeding through gastrostomy tube (G tube)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_overview_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Some children have a medical condition which prevents them from eating or drinking enough by mouth. The G tube provides special food directly into the stomach (or small intestine) so they can receive proper nutrition.</figcaption> </figure> <div class="asset-2-up"> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Cook Mac-Loc G tube</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_type_cook_mac_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><figure><span class="asset-image-title">Gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_type_GJ_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> </div><p>If the tube enters into your child’s stomach, it is a gastrostomy tube (G tube). If the end of your child’s feeding tube is in your child’s small bowel, this tube is a gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube). </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If the tube enters into your child’s stomach, it is a gastrostomy tube (G tube). </li><li>If the end of your child’s feeding tube is in your child’s small bowel, this tube is a gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube).</li><li>Usually, a doctor who is specially trained to read X-rays and images (radiologist) will put in your child’s G tube.</li><li>While your child is having a feeding, they should sit quietly doing homework, watching TV or doing any other quiet activity.</li><li>Hold your baby for at least part of the time while your baby has their feeding.</li></ul><h2>How does your child get food through a feeding tube? </h2><p>Your child will get formula through the feeding tube:</p><ul><li>a volume of fluid given a few times a day, or</li><li>a small amount of fluid given each hour continuously</li></ul><h2>Cleaning your child’s feeding tube</h2><ul><li>Flush the G tube after all feedings and medicines with 5 to 10 mL of water. Use a 5-mL or 10-mL syringe to flush the tube. </li><li>Wash all equipment, including the feeding bag, with soap and water. </li><li>If your child’s feeding bag or infusion tubing is still not clean, wash with a mixture that is one part white vinegar and one part water. Make sure to rinse again with water.</li></ul><h2>How is your child’s feeding tube inserted? </h2><ul><li>Usually, a doctor who is specially trained to read <a href="/Article?contentid=1647&language=English">X-rays</a> and images (a radiologist) will put in your child’s G tube. This is done under <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a>. </li><li>Sometimes a surgeon puts the feeding tube in. If a surgeon puts your child’s feeding tube in, your child may have a different kind of tube.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>Before your child gets their feeding tube, you must come to a class to learn all about your child’s feeding tube. We will tell you about coming to this class when we book the date for your child to get their feeding tube. This class also gives you a chance to ask questions. By the time your child is ready to go home, you should feel comfortable with all of your child’s care.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tube2905.00000000000G/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tubeG/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tubeGEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2011-03-29T04:00:00ZJulia Kelly, RN5.9000000000000076.7000000000000595.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn why some children need feeding tubes. Find an overview of the two types of feeding tubes, G and GJ tubes, how they are put in and how they are used.<br></p><p>Your child needs to be fed through a feeding tube. These feedings are called enteral feedings. An enteral feeding is a way of giving food and liquids through a tube directly into your child’s stomach or small bowel.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Feeding through gastrostomy tube (G tube)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_overview_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Some children have a medical condition which prevents them from eating or drinking enough by mouth. The G tube provides special food directly into the stomach (or small intestine) so they can receive proper nutrition.</figcaption> </figure> <div class="asset-2-up"> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Cook Mac-Loc G tube</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_type_cook_mac_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><figure><span class="asset-image-title">Gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/G_tube_type_GJ_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> </div><p>If the tube enters into your child’s stomach, it is a gastrostomy tube (G tube). If the end of your child’s feeding tube is in your child’s small bowel, this tube is a gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube). </p><h2>Why do children need feeding tubes?</h2><p>If the end of the feeding tube is in your child’s stomach, this tube is a gastrostomy tube (G tube). Your child may need a G tube because they:</p><ul><li>cannot take in enough food and liquid. So they may not be gaining enough weight.</li><li>has problems chewing and swallowing. This may cause the foods or liquids to go into your child’s lungs instead of the stomach. This is called aspiration.</li><li>cannot use all the foods they eat because of their disease. This is called malabsorption.</li><li>has a problem with food coming back up from the stomach (reflux).</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If the tube enters into your child’s stomach, it is a gastrostomy tube (G tube). </li><li>If the end of your child’s feeding tube is in your child’s small bowel, this tube is a gastrojejunal tube (GJ tube).</li><li>Usually, a doctor who is specially trained to read X-rays and images (radiologist) will put in your child’s G tube.</li><li>While your child is having a feeding, they should sit quietly doing homework, watching TV or doing any other quiet activity.</li><li>Hold your baby for at least part of the time while your baby has their feeding.</li></ul><h2>Tips during feedings</h2><ul><li>While your child is having a feeding, they should sit quietly doing homework, watching TV or doing any other quiet activity. Have your child sit with you at the table during meals.</li><li>Hold your baby for at least part of the time while your baby has their feeding. </li><li>Your child can go back to their normal activities when they finish feeding.</li><li>Call your family doctor if you need help at any time.</li></ul><h2>How does your child get food through a feeding tube? </h2><p>Your child will get formula through the feeding tube:</p><ul><li>a volume of fluid given a few times a day, or</li><li>a small amount of fluid given each hour continuously</li></ul><h2>Cleaning your child’s feeding tube</h2><ul><li>Flush the G tube after all feedings and medicines with 5 to 10 mL of water. Use a 5-mL or 10-mL syringe to flush the tube. </li><li>Wash all equipment, including the feeding bag, with soap and water. </li><li>If your child’s feeding bag or infusion tubing is still not clean, wash with a mixture that is one part white vinegar and one part water. Make sure to rinse again with water.</li></ul><h2>How is your child’s feeding tube inserted? </h2><ul><li>Usually, a doctor who is specially trained to read <a href="/Article?contentid=1647&language=English">X-rays</a> and images (a radiologist) will put in your child’s G tube. This is done under <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a>. </li><li>Sometimes a surgeon puts the feeding tube in. If a surgeon puts your child’s feeding tube in, your child may have a different kind of tube.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>Before your child gets their feeding tube, you must come to a class to learn all about your child’s feeding tube. We will tell you about coming to this class when we book the date for your child to get their feeding tube. This class also gives you a chance to ask questions. By the time your child is ready to go home, you should feel comfortable with all of your child’s care.</p>G/GJ tubes: Caring for your child and their G tube

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