Cleaning common tracheostomy equipmentCCleaning common tracheostomy equipmentCleaning common tracheostomy equipmentEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Cleaning common tracheostomy equipment2918.00000000000Cleaning common tracheostomy equipmentCleaning common tracheostomy equipmentCEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>How often must I clean my child's tracheostomy equipment?</h2> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_tools_01_EN.jpg" alt="Tracheostomy equipment" /></figure> <p> <b>Plastic (PVC) tracheostomy tubes and obturators:</b> Clean these every time you change your child’s tracheostomy tube.</p><p> <b>Silicone tracheostomy tubes and obturators:</b> Clean these every time you change your child’s tracheostomy tube.</p><p> <b>Reusable inner cannulas:</b> Clean two or three times a day or more often if dirty or if there is a lot of mucus.<br></p><p> <b>Disposable inner cannulas:</b> Do not clean or re-use these.</p><p> <b>Disposable corks or caps:</b> Do not clean and or re-use these.</p><p> <b>Reusable corks/caps:</b> Clean daily.</p><p>Proper cleaning of tracheostomy equipment helps prevent lung infections.</p><p>Most children use plastic or silicone tracheostomy tubes. If your child uses a<a href="/Article?contentid=2919&language=English"> metal or silver tracheostomy tube</a>, your child's healthcare team will explain how to clean them. </p><h2>How do I clean plastic tracheostomy tubes (for example, Shiley brand)?</h2><p>You can clean and re-sterilize reusable tracheostomy tubes, inner cannulas, obturators and corks up to three times before you should discard them.</p><h3>Before you start<br></h3><p>Gather your supplies:</p><ul><li>medical grade pipe cleaner or a tracheostomy cleaning brush (if you have a roll of pipe cleaner, you can prepare it in advance by cutting a length slightly longer than the tracheostomy tube)</li><li>3 per cent hydrogen peroxide</li><li>sterile, distilled water</li><li>a clean container with a lid or a clean plastic bag</li><li>two pairs of disposable gloves</li><li>clean towel</li><li>clean tweezers</li><li>new disposable inner cannula or clean reusable inner cannula</li><li>speaking valve and cork, if needed</li><li>two large containers or basins for soaking solutions. Containers must be large enough to easily accommodate the equipment without bending or forcing them to fit. You can use K-basins or inexpensive plastic containers.</li></ul><p>To avoid mixing up clean and dirty items, label the container for dirty equipment #1 and the container for clean equipment #2.</p><h3>Cleaning plastic tracheostomy tubes</h3><ol><li>Wash your hands. </li><li>Pour half hydrogen peroxide and half sterile, distilled water into container #1, for dirty equipment.</li><li>Pour sterilized, distilled water into container #2, for clean equipment.</li><li>Remove the used Velcro ties from the tracheostomy tube to be cleaned. Hand wash the Velcro ties in mild soap and water. Rinse and allow to dry.</li><li>Rinse the tracheostomy tube, reusable inner cannula (if applicable) and obturator with a strong stream of cold tap water.</li><li>Clean the inside and outside of the tube by scrubbing gently with a medical grade pipe cleaner and/or the tracheostomy cleaning brush. Make sure you remove visible dirt. If using a pipe cleaner, discard it with the other used and dirty supplies when you are finished cleaning.</li><li>Place the tracheostomy tube and any adjuncts (inner cannula, obturator and cork caps) in container #1. Label the container with the date and time. If you are in the hospital, make sure you include your child’s name and the contents as well. Soak the tubes for 10 minutes. Discard the solution after use.</li><li>Wash your hands.</li><li>Put on clean gloves. Remove the tubes from container #1 using your gloved hands or clean tweezers. Rinse with sterile, distilled water and then place the tubes into container #2. Soak the tubes for 10 minutes.</li><li>Remove the tubes and any adjuncts from container #2 using your gloved hands or clean tweezers. Handle by the flange.</li><li>Do not rinse the tubes with tap water. Instead, place them on a clean dry towel. Allow them to dry. Tap the tracheostomy tube gently against the towel to remove any droplets of water from inside the cannula. Do not whip or shake the cannula. Ensure all parts are completely dry.</li><li>Once dry, attach the clean ties to the flange.</li><li>Place the tubes in a clean container or plastic bag and seal the container or bag. Store the tubes properly to prevent bending or strain.</li><li>Throw out all used and dirty supplies, including the liquid solutions in containers #1 and #2.</li><li>Wash all plastic containers in soap and water. Rinse well. You can wash the containers on the top shelf of the dishwasher. See below for sterilizing containers and lids.</li><li>Remove gloves and wash your hands.</li></ol><h2>How do I clean silicone tracheostomy tubes (for example, Bivona brand)?</h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_silicone_tube_EN.jpg" alt="A Bivona silicone tracheostomy tube with an air-filled cuff." /> </figure> <p>You can clean and re-sterilize silicone tracheostomy tubes up to five times before you should discard them. These tubes have a special Superslick<sup>®</sup> coating that keeps mucus from sticking to them. Do not scrub tubes too hard or the coating will come off.</p><h3>Before you start</h3><p>Gather your supplies:<br></p><ul><li>​container for water</li><li>medical grade pipe cleaner (if you have a roll of pipe cleaner, you can prepare it in advance by cutting a length slightly longer than the tracheostomy tube)</li><li>cotton swabs or a tracheostomy cleaning brush</li><li>mild liquid, fragrance-free soap</li><li>clean container with a lid or a clean plastic bag</li><li>two pairs of disposable gloves</li><li>clean towel</li><li>clean tweezers</li><li>new disposable inner cannula or clean reusable inner cannula</li><li>speaking valve and cork, if needed</li><li>suction machine, suction catheter/adjuncts and suction tubing.</li></ul><h3>Cleaning silicone tracheostomy tubes</h3><ol><li>Wash your hands.</li><li>Prepare supplies.</li><li>Remove the used Velcro ties from the tracheostomy tube to be cleaned. Hand wash the ties in mild soap and water. Rinse with tap water and allow to dry.</li><li>Gently wash the inside and outside of the tube, the reusable inner cannula and obturator in a mild, fragrance-free detergent solution using a soft bristled brush or pipe cleaner. Take care to go gently with the brush or pipe cleaner! Too much scrubbing, scraping or stretching may damage the tube.</li><li>Rinse with tap water.</li><li>CDiscard the brush or pipe cleaner with the other used and dirty supplies when you are finished cleaning.</li><li>Soak the tracheostomy tube and any adjuncts (inner cannula, obturator) for 20 minutes in a pot of boiled water that has just been taken off the heat. Cover the pot and allow to cool.</li><li>Remove the tubes from the water with clean tweezers. Place the tubes on a clean dry towel and allow them to dry completely.</li><li>Once dry, attach the clean ties to the flange.</li><li>Place tubes in a clean container or plastic bag and seal the container or bag. Store the tubes properly to prevent bending or strain. </li><li>Discard the used water.</li><li>Remove gloves and wash your hands.</li></ol><p>*Another option for step 7 is to sterilize the tracheostomy tubes in a bottle sterilizer. If you choose this method, make sure the bottle sterilizer is used <strong>only </strong>for tracheostomy sterilization.<br></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a><br>Cleaning common tracheostomy equipmentTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2919&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2917&language=English

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