Ventilator breathing circuits: OverviewVVentilator breathing circuits: OverviewVentilator breathing circuits: OverviewEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Ventilator breathing circuits: Overview2942.00000000000Ventilator breathing circuits: OverviewVentilator breathing circuits: OverviewVEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What is a ventilator breathing circuit?</h2><p>A ventilator breathing circuit is the connection between the ventilator and your child’s tracheostomy tube to allow airflow into and out of your child’s lungs.</p><p>There are different types of ventilator breathing circuits. Your child's healthcare team will let you know the type of circuit that is best for your child. You will also learn how to connect and maintain the circuit before your child leaves the hospital.</p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Parts of a ventilator circuit</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_circuit_wet_passive_EN.jpg" alt="Parts of a wet passive ventilator circuit, as listed above" /> </figure> <h3>Parts of a ventilator circuit</h3><p>All ventilator circuits have the following parts:</p><ul><li>ventilator circuit tubing</li><li>flex tube</li><li>exhalation valve</li><li>a pressure line</li><li>an inlet filter</li><li>an outlet filter.</li></ul><h2>Ventilator circuit tubing</h2><p>This is usually about six feet long. One end of the tube attaches to an air outlet port and the other end attaches to an exhalation port.</p><p>When air needs to be <a href="/Article?contentid=2921&language=English">humidified</a>, a short tube is also used. This shorter tube goes from the air outlet port to the inlet of the humidifier pot. The long tube then attaches to the outlet of the humidifier pot to the exhalation valve.</p><p>Some circuit tubing has a heated wire, but others do not. The heated wire is designed to dry any condensation that builds up. If there is no heated wire, the circuit might instead include water traps to collect water build-up.</p><h3>Exhalation valve</h3><p>This is a vital part of a breathing circuit. There are active exhalation valves (active circuit) and passive exhalation valves (passive circuit).</p><p>When your child breathes in, an active exhalation valve closes so that the air from the ventilator can be directed into their lungs. When your child breathes out, the valve opens and directs the exhaled air out of the lungs.</p><p>The flex tube attaches to one end of the valve while the ventilator circuit tubing attaches to the other end.</p><h3>Pressure line</h3><p>This is a small tube that helps the ventilator measure air pressure (active circuit only-proximal pressure tubing). One end of the pressure line attaches to the ventilator and the other end attaches to the exhalation valve.</p><h3>Inlet filter</h3><p>This filters the air going into the ventilator.</p><h3>Outlet filter</h3><p>This filters the gas coming out of the ventilator and going into the circuit tubing.</p><h2>Types of ventilator circuits</h2><p>The Trilogy ventilator has four paediatric circuit types with tracheostomies:</p><ul><li>paediatric passive circuit, heated wire</li><li>paediatric passive circuit without heat</li><li>paediatric active circuit, heated wire</li><li>paediatric active circuit without heat.</li></ul><h3>Paediatric passive circuit</h3><p>This type of circuit is for children who are strong enough to trigger the ventilator. This circuit uses a passive exhalation device.</p><p> <em><strong>Parts of the passive circuit, heated wire</strong></em></p><ul><li>Patient connector, with flex tube</li><li>Passive exhalation valve</li><li>Temperature probe port</li><li>Heated wire ventilator circuit tubing</li><li>Heated wire connector</li><li>Chamber probe</li><li>Humidifier connection tube</li><li>Antibacterial filter (air outlet filter)</li><li>Water trap and tube (optional)</li></ul><div> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Passive circuit with </span><span class="asset-image-title">heat</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_vent_circuit_passive_heat_EN.jpg" alt="Parts of a passive heated pediatric ventilator circuit as listed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Parts</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> of a passive heated paediatric ventilator circuit, as listed. Your child’s ventilator circuit may look a little different.</figcaption> </figure> <p></p><p> <em><strong>Parts of the passive circuit without heat</strong></em></p><ul><li>Patient connector, with optional flex tube</li><li>Inline <a href="/Article?contentid=2922&language=English">HME</a></li><li>Passive exhalation device</li><li>Patient tube</li><li>Antibacterial filter (air outlet filter)</li></ul><p></p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Passive circuit without heat </span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_vent_circuit_passive_noheat_EN.jpg" alt="Parts of a passive pediatric ventilator circuit as listed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Parts of a passive paediatric ventilator circuit without heat, as listed. Your child’s ventilator circuit may look a little different.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Active flow circuit</h3><p>This circuit type is used when a patient cannot trigger the passive circuit. It allows the flow sensor and active exhalation device to respond to small changes in a child’s breathing.</p><p>The active flow circuit uses an active exhalation device. It also has a few more adjuncts (attachments) near to where the ventilator is connected to your child (exhalation valve line and two flow sensor lines). These adjuncts allow the air flow and pressure to be measured as close to the child as possible.</p><p> <em><strong>Parts of the active flow circuit, heated wire</strong></em></p><ul><li>Patient connector, with flex tube</li><li>Flow lines</li><li>Flow sensor</li><li>Active exhalation device</li><li>Temperature probe port</li><li>Exhalation valve line</li><li>Heated wire patient tube <br></li><li>Heated wire connector</li><li>Water pot (chamber)</li><li>Chamber probe</li><li>Humidifier connection tube<br></li><li>Antibacterial filter (air outlet filter)</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Active flow circuit with heat </span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_vent_circuit_active_heat_EN.jpg" alt="Parts of an active flow heated wire pediatric ventilator circuit as listed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Parts of an active flow heated wire paediatric ventilator circuit, as listed. Your child’s ventilator circuit may look a little different.</figcaption> </figure> <p> <em> <strong>Parts of the paediatric active flow circuit, without heat</strong></em></p><ul><li>Patient connector, with optional flex tube</li><li>Inline <a href="/Article?contentid=2922&language=English">HME​</a></li><li>Flow sensor</li><li>Active exhalation device</li><li>Exhalation valve line</li><li>Patient tube</li><li>Antibacterial filter (air outlet filter)</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Active flow circuit without heat </span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_vent_circuit_active_noheat_EN.jpg" alt="Parts of an active flow pediatric ventilator circuit as listed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Parts of an active flow paediatric ventilator circuit without heat, as listed. Your child’s ventilator circuit may look a little different.</figcaption> </figure> <p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a> </div>Ventilator breathing circuits: OverviewTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2943&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2941&language=English

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