How to use a manual resuscitation bagHHow to use a manual resuscitation bagHow to use a manual resuscitation bagEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

How to use a manual resuscitation bag2945.00000000000How to use a manual resuscitation bagHow to use a manual resuscitation bagHEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>How do I use a manual resuscitation bag to help my child breathe?</h2><ol><li>Gather your equipment and supplies:</li><ul><li>manual resuscitation bag</li><li>oxygen tubing, if needed.</li></ul><li>Take your child off the ventilator.</li><li>Connect the resuscitation bag to your child’s tracheostomy tube.</li><li>Squeeze the bag gently. Try to deliver about ⅓ to ½ of the volume of the bag.</li><li>Squeeze the bag so that each breath lasts about half a second to one second.</li><li>Release the bag completely and allow it to re-inflate.</li><li>Observe your child and check if they are comfortable. Watch to make sure:</li><ul><li>their chest is rising</li><li>they are awake and aware of what is happening</li><li>they are not turning blue.</li></ul><li>Make sure you give your child enough time to breathe out before squeezing the bag again.</li><li>Squeeze the resuscitation bag in a regular pattern, about once every four or five seconds. You can ask your child to guide you on how much air to give and how fast to give the breaths, if they are able to communicate verbally or non-verbally. Ask your child:</li><ul><li>“Is this enough air?”</li><li>“Do you want more?”</li></ul></ol><div class="caution"><h3>​Precautions</h3><ul><li>Do not squeeze the bag too hard, as that could damage your child’s lungs.</li><li>Do not squeeze the bag too fast.</li><li>If your child is not responding during manual resuscitation, call 911 immediately.</li></ul></div><h2>My child’s lungs tend to collapse. What can I do?</h2><p>If your child is prone to lung collapse, your doctor may prescribe a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) valve. This valve attaches to your child’s manual resuscitation bag.</p><p>A small amount of pressure applied to your child’s lung will help prevent further lung collapse during suctioning. This may help improve your child’s oxygen level in the blood. See the sections on <a href="/Article?contentid=2958&language=English">oxygen​</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=2962&language=English">the oximeter</a> for more details.<br></p><p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a>How to use a manual resuscitation bagTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2946&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2944&language=English

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