Medications and vaccines: General knowledgeMMedications and vaccines: General knowledgeMedications and vaccines: General knowledgeEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatment;Drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Medications and vaccines: General knowledge2951.00000000000Medications and vaccines: General knowledgeMedications and vaccines: General knowledgeMEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatment;Drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What do I need to know about the medications my child will be taking at home?</h2><p>Your child may need to take medications regularly when they go home from the hospital.</p><p>Before your child goes home, it is important that you know:<br></p><ul><li>why your child is taking the medication</li><li>the dose of your child's medication in mL and mg</li><li>how many times a day the medication needs to be given </li><li>how it needs to be given (for example, by mouth, through a feeding tube or into the tracheostomy)</li><li>if the medication needs to be given on an empty stomach or with food</li><li>how and where the medication should be stored (some medications need to be stored in the fridge)</li><li>possible medication side effects </li><li>when to skip or repeat a medication dose<br></li><li>if the medication is available at your local pharmacy and, if not, which pharmacies sell it</li><li>which medications your child is allergic to.</li></ul><p>Your healthcare team will review this information with you before you and your child leave the hospital.</p><p>Always carry an up-to-date list of all the medications your child is using as well as the doses they are taking. You could ask your child’s pharmacy to give you a list of your child’s medications and doses or you could take photos of your child’s medications and save them for reference.</p><h2>How are medications delivered directly to the lungs? </h2><p>Medications can be delivered directly to the lungs in two ways:</p><ul><li>through a <a href="/Article?contentid=2952&language=English">meter dose inhaler/puffer</a></li><li>through a <a href="/Article?contentid=2953&language=English">nebulizer​</a>, which produces a mist that is inhaled into the lungs.</li></ul><h2>What are the signs that my child is having an allergic reaction to a medication? What should I do? </h2><p>If your child is having an allergic reaction to a medication, they may experience:</p><ul><li>tingling or itching in the mouth</li><li>hives</li><li>swelling of the lips, face, tongue and throat </li><li>wheezing</li><li>difficulty breathing</li><li>stomach pain, nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea</li><li>dizziness or fainting</li><li>rash.</li></ul><p>If you suspect that your child is having an allergic reaction, stop giving your child the medication and seek medical attention immediately.</p><h2>Is it safe for my child to receive routine childhood vaccinations? </h2><p>Yes. Vaccinations are an important way to prevent your child from getting certain infections. Ask your child’s doctor which vaccinations are recommended based on your child's age.</p><p>Some children with certain medical conditions may not be able to receive vaccinations. Check your child's healthcare team if vaccinations are safe for your child.</p><h2>Should my child and the members of our family receive the influenza (flu) vaccine? </h2><p>Yes. The influenza (flu) vaccine is the best prevention against getting the flu. The vaccination can be given to most children who are more than six months old.</p><p>The flu spreads very easily from one infected person to another through coughing and sneezing. To minimize the risk of flu: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2914&language=English">wash your hands</a> carefully and often</li><li>keep the surfaces in your home clean</li><li>cough and sneeze into your arm or sleeve</li><li>avoid contact with anyone who is currently sick.</li></ul><p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a><br>Medications and vaccines: General knowledgeTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2952&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2950&language=English

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