Preparing for a long-term power failurePPreparing for a long-term power failurePreparing for a long-term power failureEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatment;Healthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Preparing for a long-term power failure2957.00000000000Preparing for a long-term power failurePreparing for a long-term power failurePEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatment;Healthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_ventilator_battery_location_EN.jpg" alt="A removable battery at the back of a ventilator machine" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A removable battery at the back of a ventilator machine</figcaption></figure> <p>​​Many of the routine procedures that need to be performed when a child has a tracheostomy rely on a steady supply of power. It is important to be prepared in case of a long-term power failure (a power failure for more than six hours) so that you can minimize any disruptions to your child's care.</p><h3>1. Make sure you have ventilator back-up batteries.</h3><p>If your child uses a <a href="/Article?contentid=2937&language=English">ventilator</a>, make sure you have back-up batteries for it. If you are having trouble paying for back-up batteries, <a href="http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/specialneeds/disabilities.aspx" target="_blank">Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities (ACSD)</a>, the <a href="http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/odsp/" target="_blank">Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)</a>, your health insurance company or various service clubs can help with funding.</p><p>If there is a power failure, and your child uses a ventilator, use the external DC battery from the <a href="http://ontvep.ca/" target="_blank">Ventilator Equipment Pool (VEP)</a>. </p><p>For the <a href="/Article?contentid=2941&language=English">Philips Respironics Trilogy ventilator</a> only: </p><ul><li>a fully-charged external battery should last five to 12 hours</li><li>an internal battery should last two to three hours</li><li>a detachable battery should last two to three hours.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/tracheostomy_ventilator_battery_EN.jpg" alt="An internal battery for a ventilator showing the glowing bars that indicate the remaining battery power" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An internal detachable battery pack for a ventilator, showing the glowing bars that indicate the remaining battery power</figcaption> </figure> <p>If you use a different ventilator, please check the manufacturer’s manual.</p><h3>2. Plan how you can leave your home quickly.</h3><p>Make a plan for how your family can get out of your home if there is a power failure (or another type of <a href="/Article?contentid=2956&language=English">emergency</a>). Getting out of your home quickly and safely can be difficult, for example if you live in a high-rise apartment building where a power failure interferes with the elevators. </p><h3>3. Have a contact list on hand.</h3><p>Have a <a href="/Article?contentid=2954&language=English">list of family and friends​</a> who live in your area. Make sure at least one person on your contact list lives nearby and understands your needs.</p><p>If there is a power failure, call your contact list to see if their power is out. If they still have power, you can go to their home.</p><h3>4. Know where you can access a steady power supply.</h3><p>Research a place that will have a steady supply of power even during a long-term power failure and plan how you will get there. It could be a hospital, a hotel, a fire station or an ambulance hall near your home. </p> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <span class="asset-image-title">Back panel of a ventilator</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_vent_back_EN.jpg" alt="The back panel of a ventilator" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Batteries, connectors and filters are usually located on the back of ventilator machines</figcaption> </figure> <p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a><br>Preparing for a long-term power failureTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2958&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2956&language=English

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