Oxygen therapy: General knowledgeOOxygen therapy: General knowledgeOxygen therapy: General knowledgeEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Oxygen therapy: General knowledge2958.00000000000Oxygen therapy: General knowledgeOxygen therapy: General knowledgeOEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_tank_gauge_EN.jpg" alt="An oxygen tank with a gauge connected to the top" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An oxygen tank with a gauge connected to the top</figcaption> </figure> <p>You may feel anxious about taking your child home if they need oxygen therapy. Please be assured that although oxygen therapy sounds complicated, your healthcare team will walk you through each step of the process and answer all your questions.</p><h2>What is oxygen?</h2><p>Oxygen is a gas that makes up about 21 per cent of the air we breathe. It is the fuel that all parts of the body need to work properly.</p><h2>What is oxygen therapy?</h2><p>Home oxygen therapy is oxygen that is provided through a machine at home when your child leaves hospital. It is used for many different heart and lung conditions and can help decrease the amount of work needed to breathe. Oxygen is a medication when it is delivered as a therapy, so you will need a prescription from your child’s healthcare team.</p><p>Some children need oxygen therapy for the rest of their lives, but others may need it only temporarily. Some children need oxygen throughout the day, but others may need it only when they sleep. </p><h2>How will I know if my child needs home oxygen therapy?</h2><p>To identify if your child needs home oxygen therapy, your child’s healthcare team will use an overnight oximetry test to monitor their usual oxygen levels while they sleep. From there, they can identify how much oxygen your child needs. </p><p>If your healthcare team deems your child to be too fragile for the standard off-oxygen oximetry test, they will do an oximetry while your child is using oxygen and write a letter to accompany your child's application for home oxygen therapy.</p><h2>What happens during the overnight oximetry test?</h2><p>The overnight oximetry test uses a machine called an <a href="/Article?contentid=2962&language=English">oximeter (an oxygen saturation monitor</a>). This uses a probe attached to your child’s finger or toe to measure the amount of oxygen in your child's blood. Your child will not need any pokes for this test.</p><p>When the test is finished, your child’s healthcare team will remove the probe and will print and review an oximetry, the record of your child’s oxygen levels while the probe was in place. </p><p>Based on the oximetry, the healthcare team can identify if your child needs home oxygen therapy and, if so, how much oxygen they need. They can then monitor your child’s oxygen levels over time to decide if the prescription needs to be changed or if your child still needs home oxygen therapy.</p><h2>What happens if home oxygen therapy is recommended for my child?</h2><p>Once your child’s healthcare team confirms that your child needs oxygen therapy at home, the next steps are to:</p><ul><li>look into funding from the Assistive Devices Program (ADP)</li><li>contact a local medical vendor to get the home oxygen therapy system.</li></ul><h3>Assistive Devices Program (ADP) funding</h3><p>Your child’s doctor will confirm if you qualify for funding from the <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/assistive-devices-program" target="_blank">Assistive Devices Program (ADP)</a> run by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care (MOHLTC).</p><p>To apply for <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/home-oxygen-therapy" target="_blank">ADP funding for home oxygen therapy​</a>, you, your child’s doctor and the medical vendor will work together to complete an application form.</p><p>ADP covers 75 per cent of the cost of home oxygen therapy. Private insurance may pay for the remaining 25 per cent. If you are receiving government benefits (such as Ontario Works, Ontario Disability Support Program, Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities or Interim Federal Health Program), the ADP will cover 100 per cent of the oxygen costs.</p><h2>Medical vendors that supply oxygen at home</h2><p>The medical vendor is the company that will supply the home oxygen therapy system for your home. Your healthcare team will connect you with the medical vendor nearest to you.</p><p>The company will come into your home to set up the home oxygen therapy system and work with you to figure out the best way to provide your home with a fixed source of oxygen. The medical vendor will also provide portable tanks that you will use with your child outside your home and if there is a power failure.</p><p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a><br>Oxygen therapy: General knowledgeTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2959&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2957&language=English

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