Types of home oxygen therapy systemsTTypes of home oxygen therapy systemsTypes of home oxygen therapy systemsEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Types of home oxygen therapy systems2959.00000000000Types of home oxygen therapy systemsTypes of home oxygen therapy systemsTEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>There are three types of home oxygen therapy systems:</p><ul><li>concentrator (stationary or portable)</li><li>oxygen cylinder</li><li>liquid system.<br></li></ul><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_concentrator_EN.jpg" alt="A stationary oxygen concentrator" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A stationary oxygen concentrator</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Concentrator (stationary or portable)</h2><ul><li>A concentrator is a machine that makes oxygen by taking in air from the room and separating the oxygen. </li><li>It can be powered by electricity or a battery. </li><li>It does not need to be replaced or refilled regularly because it makes oxygen from the air in the room.</li><li>A stationary concentrator is often placed in the home, along with back-up oxygen cylinders in case of a power failure.</li><li>A portable oxygen concentrator can be used as a short-term solution when travelling.</li></ul><p> <br> </p><p> <br> </p><p> <br> </p><p> <br> </p><p> <br> </p><p> <br> </p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_tank_EN.jpg" alt="A portable oxygen cylinder or tank" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A portable oxygen cylinder or tank</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Oxygen cylinder</h2><ul><li>Oxygen cylinders are aluminum or steel tanks that contain compressed oxygen.</li><li>There are different cylinder sizes. Larger cylinders (sizes E and H) are used in hospitals or as a back-up to a concentrator in the home. Smaller cylinders can be used in the home, for short outings or when travelling.</li><li>Regardless of the size of the cylinders, each comes with a pressure gauge. The gauge tells you how much oxygen is left in the tank, using the measurement of pounds per square inch (psi). When the cylinder is full, the gauge will read 2200 psi. When empty, it will read 0 psi.</li><li>How long the oxygen cylinder will last depends on your child's oxygen flow rate, as prescribed by your child’s healthcare team. For instance, a cylinder will run out quickly if used continuously at a high flow rate. Ask your medical vendor how long one cylinder will last based on the flow rate prescribed for your child.</li></ul><p> <br> </p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_liquid_oxy_system_EN.jpg" alt="A liquid oxygen system and portable stroller" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A liquid oxygen liberator and portable stroller</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Liquid system</h2><ul><li>A liquid system uses oxygen that has been cooled and compressed until it becomes a liquid.</li><li>The liquid oxygen is kept in large stationary containers called reservoirs.</li><li>The liquid turns into gas before it leaves the reservoir and remains a gas when it is breathed in.</li><li>The liquid reservoirs must be refilled regularly by your medical vendor.</li><li>A liquid oxygen system has two main advantages:</li><ul><li>it generally lasts longer than an oxygen cylinder</li><li>you can use the oxygen in the large liquid reservoir to fill up a portable liquid oxygen unit for use outside the home.</li></ul></ul><ul><li>The biggest disadvantage of a liquid system is that the oxygen will eventually warm up and evaporate even if it is not used. For example, if you are away from home for a long time, your medical vendor may need to refill the reservoir when you return home.</li><li>As with oxygen cylinders, how long the portable units will last depends on your child's oxygen flow rate, as prescribed by their healthcare team. Ask your medical vendor how long one tank will last based on the flow rate prescribed for your child.​<br></li></ul><p> <br> </p></div></div></div><p></p><div class="caution"><h3>​​​​Precautions</h3><ul><li>Keep oxygen and the oxygen system at least 1.8 metres (6 feet) away from sources of heat or fire. High temperatures increase the pressure inside oxygen cylinders and liquid reservoirs, which could cause them to break. </li><li>Smoking is a fire hazard. Do not smoke or let anyone else, including visitors, smoke in the area where your child is using the oxygen system. </li><li>Let your local fire department know that you have a child using home oxygen therapy.</li><li>Store the oxygen in a well-ventilated area. Do not store cylinders/tanks or liquid units in a closet.</li><li>Do not use Vaseline or any other petroleum-based products on your child’s face. </li><li>Always check portable tanks before you leave home to make sure you will have enough oxygen while you are out. Also plan to bring extra in case of unexpected delays.<br></li></ul></div><p></p><div class="asset-4-up"> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_pressure_gauge_EN.jpg" alt="A pressure gauge or regulator for an oxygen tank" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An oxygen tank pressure gauge (or regulator) includes a nozzle to connect the tubing and a numbered gauge showing the amount of oxygen in the tank</figcaption> </figure> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_tank_gauge_EN.jpg" alt="An oxygen tank with a gauge connected to the top" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An oxygen tank with a gauge connected to the top</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_gauge_full_EN.jpg" alt="An oxygen tank gauge showing what a full tank level would look like" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> An oxygen tank gauge showing the oxygen level when a tank is full</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_oxygen_gauge_empty_EN.jpg" alt="An oxygen tank gauge showing an empty tank" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> An oxygen tank gauge showing the oxygen level when a tank is empty</figcaption> </figure></div><p></p> <a class="btn btn-primary" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/trachvent">Return to trach-vent learning hub</a><br>Types of home oxygen therapy systemsTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2960&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2958&language=English

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