How to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeHHow to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeHow to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

How to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tube2970.00000000000How to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeHow to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeHEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lungs;TracheaRespiratory systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+) Hospital healthcare providersNA2017-06-29T04:00:00ZReshma Amin, MD, FRCPC, MSc;Faiza Syed, BHSc, RRT;Tuyen Tran, RRT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>​​How do I use a speaking valve?</h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/tracheostomy_speaking_valve_on_child3_EN.jpg" alt="A patient wearing a tracheostomy speaking valve" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A patient wearing a tracheostomy speaking valve</figcaption></figure><br> <ol><li>Gather the following equipment and supplies:</li><ul><li>a <a href="/Article?contentid=2969&language=English">speaking valve</a> (as prescribed by your child’s healthcare team)</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2928&language=English">suction machine and supplies</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2917&language=English">emergency tracheostomy kit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2944&language=English">manual resuscitation bag</a> </li><li>ventilator, <a href="/Article?contentid=2943&language=English">ventilator circuit</a> and connectors (if applicable)</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2962&language=English">oxygen saturation monitor</a> and probes</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2958&language=English">oxygen</a> (if applicable).</li></ul><li>If the <a href="/Article?contentid=2916&language=English">tracheostomy tube</a> has a cuff, make sure it is completely deflated.</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=2929&language=English">Suction</a> the tracheostomy tube to make sure it is clear of secretions (if using a cuffed tube, suction before and after you deflate the cuff).</li><li>While holding the flange of the tracheostomy tube with one hand, place the speaking valve on the tracheostomy tube with a gentle twist in a clockwise direction. (To remove the valve, twist it in the opposite direction.)</li><li>If your child is also using a <a href="/Article?contentid=2937&language=English">ventilator</a>, your healthcare team will instruct you on the proper placement of the valve in line with the ventilator circuit. Your healthcare team might recommend changing some of the ventilator settings while your child is using the speaking valve.</li><li>Once the speaking valve is in place, watch your child for signs of distress and lower oxygen saturation levels.</li><li>If your child uses a cuffed tracheostomy tube, remember to re-inflate the cuff after you remove the speaking valve.</li></ol><div class="caution"><h3>​​Precautions</h3><ul><li> <strong>Awake:</strong> Never use the speaking valve when your child is asleep.</li><li> <strong>Well:</strong> Never use the speaking valve when your child is sick or has increased secretions.</li><li> <strong>Deflate:</strong> If using a cuffed tracheostomy tube, make sure the cuff is deflated before placing the speaking valve.</li><li> <strong>Suction:</strong> Always suction before placing the speaking valve onto the tracheostomy tube.</li><li> <strong>Speaking valve:</strong> Place the speaking valve onto the tracheostomy tube using a ggentle clockwise motion.</li><li> <strong>Monitor</strong>: Your child should never be left alone, especially when first using the speaking valve. Monitor them and their oxygen saturation the whole time.</li></ul></div><h2>How do I check the speaking valve is working properly?</h2><p>To check the speaking valve, make sure:</p><ul><li>there is no tear in the valve</li><li>the valve is not sticking</li><li>there are no cracks on the side of the valve</li><li>you do not hear vibrations</li><li>there is no increased resistance when your child breathes in.</li></ul><h2>How often should I clean the speaking valve?</h2><p>Clean the speaking valve daily.</p><h2>How do I clean the speaking valve?</h2><ol><li>Place the speaking valve and accessories in a solution of pure, unscented liquid soap and warm water, or soak for 10 minutes in 175 mL to 250 mL (3/4 to 1 cup) of warm water with one speaking valve cleaning tablet. (To order speaking valve cleaning tablets, visit store.passy-muir.com or call 1-800-634-5397.)</li><li>Rinse the speaking valve thoroughly with warm water.</li><li>Allow the speaking valve to air dry completely before storing in a closed container.</li></ol><div class="caution"><h3>Precautions</h3><ul><li>Never clean the speaking valve with hot water, peroxide bleach, vinegar, alcohol, brushes or cotton swabs. </li><li>Do not autoclave or apply heat to the speaking valve.</li></ul></div><h2>What do I do if it is harder for my child to breathe when using the speaking valve?</h2><p>Remove the valve immediately. Then:</p><ul><li>check that the tracheostomy cuff is completely deflated (if relevant)</li><li>make sure your child is in a comfortable upright position</li><li>check the position of the tracheostomy tube</li><li>suction your child's airway and mouth to clear secretions</li><li>try distracting your child to decrease anxiety.</li></ul><p>If you have tried all of the above and your child is still having difficulty breathing, contact your healthcare team.</p><h2>What do I do if the speaking valve is making a noise?</h2><p>Clean the speaking valve. If the noise persists after cleaning, replace the speaking valve.</p><h2>What if my child is using the speaking valve but still cannot speak or produce vocalizations?</h2><p>It will take some time for your child to get used to the feeling of air passing up through the upper airway. You can try distracting your child, for example with fun games, activities, videos or music. Also, any sound is good sound, so praise your child anytime they use their voice, whether they produce a sound, a laugh or even a cry.</p><div class="asset-2-up"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_speaking_valve_on_child2_EN.jpg" alt="A child wearing a tracheostomy speaking valve" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A child wearing a tracheostomy speaking valve</figcaption> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/trach_child_with_inline_PMV_vent_EN.jpg" alt="A child with an inline speaking valve (PMV) with a ventilator set-up" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A child wearing an inline speaking valve with the ventilator circuit</figcaption> </figure></div>How to use a speaking valve with a tracheostomy tubeTruehttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2971&language=Englishhttps://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2969&language=English

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